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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 12/31/2005 8:16:17 PM EDT
All manner of graphic blow up stories from reloads, some / most?? from head space issues. I reload to control head space in other types of rifles and now for an AR, I'm supposed to buy factory ammo?
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 8:22:50 PM EDT
They are Full of it. Reloads properly done, fired in a safe and functioning rifle are fine.

Link Posted: 12/31/2005 8:25:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/31/2005 8:25:49 PM EDT by ALPHAGHOST]

Originally Posted By tabersmith:
They are Full of it. Reloads properly done, fired in a safe and functioning rifle are fine.




+1, even in an AR

h/w, watch the loads! there are some folks around here who have had problems w/ reloads, but other have also had kBs from factory ammo too...
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 8:28:48 PM EDT
Lefty,


Have seen questionable results from RCBS, Hornady,Lee, and Hollywood.

The thing about loading your own is that YOU controll dimensions.

Spend the cash to verify the dimensions with chamber gauges.

Redding Dies are the only ones I trust, and I still check them.

Dillon dies are close, but have returned several.


Be carefull.
do the math.

S-28



Link Posted: 1/1/2006 9:31:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/1/2006 9:38:19 AM EDT by CK]

Originally Posted By S-28:
Lefty,


Have seen questionable results from RCBS, Hornady,Lee, and Hollywood.

The thing about loading your own is that YOU controll dimensions.

Spend the cash to verify the dimensions with chamber gauges.

Redding Dies are the only ones I trust, and I still check them.

Dillon dies are close, but have returned several.


Be carefull.
do the math.

S-28







+1 on the Redding dies, which I use with my Dillon 550 for reloading 223. After I'm finished with the batch that I just reloaded, I grab a couple of random rounds I just reloaded and check them with my 223 (Dillon) case gauge. A little self QA helps IMHO
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 9:39:41 AM EDT
Full Length Resize - Trim case Length

You be Fine
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 9:50:12 AM EDT
The folks at Fulton want to scare off the less than committed reloaders, and for good reason. A halfassed reload is a dangerous thing, as their pictures graphically demonstrate. You can't just buy a Dillon, some powder and primers, some bullets and a pile of brass and magically produce factory-quality reloads. It takes patience, practice, attention to detail, patience, practice, and attention to detail (repeats intentional) to even begin to make safe, reliable and consistent ammunition. If you ain't in it for as close to perfection as possible, stick to reloading .38 wadcutter target loads. If instead your'e willing to give 100% of your attention to each step in the process, starting with developing the load, then don't do it. Period.

The fact that using reloads voids the Fulton warranty means that Clint has paid off on too many warranties caused by bad reloads. Reloads aren't evil or necessarily dangerous, but you MUST apply yourself 100% to making them.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 10:54:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/1/2006 10:56:42 AM EDT by Another-Bill]
We just blew through 1400 rounds of reloads in a bunch of F/A M16's with narry a hitch. My friend Wayne has shot .223 reloads for many years. I shoot .308 reloads in my M1A and Remy M700 with no problems. You have to dedicate your self to it to be safe.

Bill
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 11:08:27 AM EDT
If you are concerned about reloading yourself for your AR take a look at Blackhills ammo. They also sell good reloads.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 11:13:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AKsRule:
Full Length Resize - Trim case Length

You be Fine



+1

I use Scharch Military 5.56 "Processed" (cleaned, sized, reemed pockets and trimmed). I use Redding dies with a full length sizer and I also only "Taper Crimp" (which is SOP for anything that is Semi or Full Auto). I can do 4 loadings before the cases start to get a little long, but I usually "Store" that brass and use new processed instead of trimming (which is brutal IMHO). The one thing I have found (before the round ever gets into a weapon) is to watch for loose primer pockets on reloaded brass.

I've loaded well over 15,000 rounds of 5.56mm on my Dillon 550 with Zero failures of any kind. ZERO!

I've also loaded over 100,000 rounds of 45 ACP, 10,000 rounds of Match .308 and several thousand rounds of .38, .357, 9mm, 44 Mag with zero failures of any kind. ZERO!

My point...Reloading is every bit as reliable as factory ammo if you use quality components, and proven, quality processes. It's not for everyone, but I have enjoyed it for over 28 years without fail.

YMMV

Tack
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 11:23:49 AM EDT
In the article on Fulton Armory's website you see a destroyed rifle, with no scientific evidence as to what might have caused it, reloads or not, it may have been shooter error that destroyed the rifle, but there isn't any evidence as to what really caused the KB. One possible explanation is a misfire on the previous round that stuck a bullet in the barrel, that can happen with factory ammo also, but if the shooter ejects the case and doesn't inspect the barrel, the next shot will blow it up.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:30:14 PM EDT
Sunday, January 01, 2006

With the cost of military and civilian .223 / 5.56 mm ammunition so reasonable, I really do not understand why anyone would want to go through the muss and fuss of reloading ammunition. Reloading is not cost effective after the cost and components and labor time is factored in.

Why take the risk of something going wrong with the reloading process with factory ammunition readily available?

Take Care!

MP5 Machinenpistole
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:39:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MP5MachinenPistole:
Sunday, January 01, 2006

With the cost of military and civilian .223 / 5.56 mm ammunition so reasonable, I really do not understand why anyone would want to go through the muss and fuss of reloading ammunition. Reloading is not cost effective after the cost and components and labor time is factored in.

Why take the risk of something going wrong with the reloading process with factory ammunition readily available?

Take Care!

MP5 Machinenpistole



I go to the time/expense because #1 reloading is another hobby of mine, and B, I like the performance of my reloads for varmint hunting. As long as you are careful and pay attention to detail you'll be fine. Oh and NO it's NOT for everyone! In the ARFCOM spirit, GET BOTH!
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:42:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MP5MachinenPistole:
Sunday, January 01, 2006

With the cost of military and civilian .223 / 5.56 mm ammunition so reasonable, I really do not understand why anyone would want to go through the muss and fuss of reloading ammunition. Reloading is not cost effective after the cost and components and labor time is factored in.

Why take the risk of something going wrong with the reloading process with factory ammunition readily available?

Take Care!

MP5 Machinenpistole


There is very little to nothing that is commercially available that will do what NRA Highpwer and other target shooters need to do.

What risks are you talking about regarding reloading? The only risks exist when the person doing the reloading does it with his head buried deep in his ass.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:44:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/1/2006 5:44:55 PM EDT by SWO_daddy]

Originally Posted By S-28:
Lefty,


Have seen questionable results from RCBS, Hornady,Lee, and Hollywood.

The thing about loading your own is that YOU controll dimensions.

Spend the cash to verify the dimensions with chamber gauges.

Redding Dies are the only ones I trust, and I still check them.

Dillon dies are close, but have returned several.


Be carefull.
do the math.

S-28





Tools that measure the distance from bolt face to lands and to measure case shoulder setback are essential.

Anyone reloading rifle cartridges without them or without a complete understanding of how to use the measurements obtained is a fool of the highest order.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:47:12 PM EDT
There are many companys that don't want reloads in their rifles.

Its to easy for some dumb ass to over charge the case and damage the weapon. Then the rumors start, was it the gun....was it the ammo.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:51:05 PM EDT
As I put my 20 years of reloading experience reloading to the test when I shoot. I use my ammunition in Service Rifle and High Power Competition as do every one of the folks I shoot with. Holy Cow you have to be careful but reloading is not Rocket Science. Attention to detail and pride in your ability to produce a very superior product is the key. What bullshit to scare people away from reloading. I do understand where they are coming from but do not agree with it.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 6:21:47 PM EDT
Fulton warns that reloads will kaboom any rifle, M1, AR whatever.

Not so sure I believe that... as my M1 and AR and 1911 have yet to go boom with my reloads.

And I am far from a 20+ reloader.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 6:28:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MP5MachinenPistole:
Sunday, January 01, 2006

With the cost of military and civilian .223 / 5.56 mm ammunition so reasonable, I really do not understand why anyone would want to go through the muss and fuss of reloading ammunition. Reloading is not cost effective after the cost and components and labor time is factored in.

Why take the risk of something going wrong with the reloading process with factory ammunition readily available?

Take Care!

MP5 Machinenpistole



Reloading day-to-day blasting ammo is IMHO not cost effective compared to shooting Wolf or mil-surp...

Reloading for NM competition, otoh, IS cost effective as even Black Hills blue-box (factory reloads) costs $20/50rds... Plus the accuracy benefits of finding exactly what your rifle likes to shoot...
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 7:34:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Tack:

Originally Posted By AKsRule:
Full Length Resize - Trim case Length

You be Fine



+1

I use Scharch Military 5.56 "Processed" (cleaned, sized, reemed pockets and trimmed). I use Redding dies with a full length sizer and I also only "Taper Crimp" (which is SOP for anything that is Semi or Full Auto). I can do 4 loadings before the cases start to get a little long, but I usually "Store" that brass and use new processed instead of trimming (which is brutal IMHO). The one thing I have found (before the round ever gets into a weapon) is to watch for loose primer pockets on reloaded brass.

I've loaded well over 15,000 rounds of 5.56mm on my Dillon 550 with Zero failures of any kind. ZERO!

I've also loaded over 100,000 rounds of 45 ACP, 10,000 rounds of Match .308 and several thousand rounds of .38, .357, 9mm, 44 Mag with zero failures of any kind. ZERO!

My point...Reloading is every bit as reliable as factory ammo if you use quality components, and proven, quality processes. It's not for everyone, but I have enjoyed it for over 28 years without fail.

YMMV

Tack



I totally agree with the above, but I want to stress the part about the brass. Tack pointed out the type of brass he used. IMHO, this is the most important part of safe reloading. You HAVE to know where the brass comes from and how many times it has been fired. If you are using brass from a "known" source and have to resize it, it is (usually) recommended that one use a small base resizing die for ammo to be shot in semi/full weapons.

Case inspections (and knowing what to look for) are required.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 7:44:25 PM EDT
That is why I use a Turret Press on my rifle loads. But I disagree on cost. I buy lots of Win white box, collect the cases, use pull down powder ot TAC bought by the 8 lb from a buddy, use pull out military bullets or 62 grain from Thunder Mountain and I can make 100 rounds for about 3 bucks. Now my match brass is Lake City, weighed, trimmed, and chamfered. My match load is Hornady 75 grain Moly, and it is really good stuff. I couldn't pay for it from a boooolet company.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 3:53:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2006 3:56:02 AM EDT by USNTopGun378]
Originally Posted By MP5MachinenPistole:
Sunday, January 01, 2006

With the cost of military and civilian .223 / 5.56 mm ammunition so reasonable, I really do not understand why anyone would want to go through the muss and fuss of reloading ammunition. Reloading is not cost effective after the cost and components and labor time is factored in.

Why take the risk of something going wrong with the reloading process with factory ammunition readily available?

Take Care!

MP5 Machinenpistole

Its not about cost. Its about pulling the trigger on a 40gr VMAX with a max powder charge and hearing a bit more thump than you hear with factory ammo. Sometimes its about ripping one ragged hole at 100yds. Handloading is like having hundreds of your own children.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 8:31:09 AM EDT
Besides when you can go out and shoot and you've read all of the post here what else is there to do?
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 10:35:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GHPorter:
The folks at Fulton want to scare off the less than committed reloaders, and for good reason. A halfassed reload is a dangerous thing, as their pictures graphically demonstrate. You can't just buy a Dillon, some powder and primers, some bullets and a pile of brass and magically produce factory-quality reloads. It takes patience, practice, attention to detail, patience, practice, and attention to detail (repeats intentional) to even begin to make safe, reliable and consistent ammunition. If you ain't in it for as close to perfection as possible, stick to reloading .38 wadcutter target loads. If instead your'e willing to give 100% of your attention to each step in the process, starting with developing the load, then don't do it. Period.

The fact that using reloads voids the Fulton warranty means that Clint has paid off on too many warranties caused by bad reloads. Reloads aren't evil or necessarily dangerous, but you MUST apply yourself 100% to making them.



You hit the nail on the head, GHPorter. No matter how many good, safe, reliable reloaders there are out there, there will always be enough idiots to make this sort of thing a problem. The companies cannot say "Good reloaders can do this, but idiots shouldn't." They've just got to say, "don't do it." Sad fact of a litigious society. I have a couple of handguns that I load somewhat over SAAMI spec -- .45 Colt and .44 Spl -- I know it can be done with no danger to the gun or to people, but I would not recommend it to anyone, because I don't know if they will be as careful as I was when I worked up these loads. Some of the stuff I've seen done, I wonder why there aren't more kabooms.

So anyone who knows they are reloading to spec has nothing to worry about and can ignore the lawyer-talk. I've got to say, though, that anyone (except a beginning reloader) who needs to be told this may not be as competent a reloader as they think they are, and might want to address the issue with a little self-honesty.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 10:39:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tabersmith:
They are Full of it. Reloads properly done, fired in a safe and functioning rifle are fine.


+1
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