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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/3/2005 5:27:31 PM EDT
Does this suck? The head and elbows were from a resting position. The chest was completely from a tactical stance (standing only, three mags w/ 20 rounds each). Will I be able to tighten this up with practice? Comments of neg/pos. nature are welcome; lay it on me.




Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:29:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:31:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bigbore:
keep practicing



crappy isnt it.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:32:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AWACER:

Originally Posted By bigbore:
keep practicing



crappy isnt it.



You killed him, good enough.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:33:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 5:37:24 PM EDT by bigbore]
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:33:59 PM EDT

The chest shots aren't too bad if you were just getting the gun up, grabbing a sight picture, and getting a quick hit. A hit is a hit. It isn't like hunting. The rested shots are OK.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:44:15 PM EDT
What I say is that if you can hit within the torso, you're gonna be able to take the guy down. It'd be nice to have a tight group of course but before you do that, you should be able to stay in the torso first. I'd say that's good, but you need practice if you want a tighter group of course.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:46:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bigbore:

Originally Posted By AWACER:

Originally Posted By bigbore:
keep practicing



crappy isnt it.




Compared to what? For all I know, last week you completely missed the paper with half the shots. In that case, this is pretty good. No matter how good you are, keep practicing.




No, this is how well I've shot it since I got it in April. I'm more of a pistol shooter. I believe that my trigger control is not adapted to rifle shooting. I take to much time in between shots, the sights have too much time to float around and when it goes off I'm usually not where I wanted it to be. Dont worry, I'm going to keep practicing though.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:47:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 5:49:36 PM EDT by Bullseye_Doc_Holiday]
Yeah, really depends upon how fast you were firing, but EVERYONE can improve. Remember...nobody owns this stuff. I think USMC03 once said, "Until they're all in the same hole, there's room for improvement"

Having said all that, not really bad. Remember consistency is key. Cheekweld, sight alignment, trigger control.

ETA; in regards to trigger control, one thing that helped me was to be concious of the reset. This goes a long way to prevent "snatching" the trigger.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:51:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bullseye_Doc_Holiday:
Yeah, really depends upon how fast you were firing, but EVERYONE can improve. Remember...nobody owns this stuff. I think USMC03 once said, "Until they're all in the same hole, there's room for improvement"

Having said all that, not really bad. Remember consistency is key. Cheekweld, sight alignment, trigger control.

ETA; in regards to trigger control, one thing that helped me was to be concious of the reset. This goes a long way to prevent "snatching" the trigger.




10-4
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:52:07 PM EDT
I just started shooting my first AR lately.

With that limited experience though, what helped me tighten stuff up was to treat the trigger like I shoot my Glock...Squeeze the shot all the way back, hold it, let off till you get your trigger reset...then start squezing again and repeat...

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:03:31 PM EDT
When you get them all in one hole, then you can stop practicing.......
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:08:24 PM EDT
Practice. Practice. Practice. Especially important considering that you might be using it at work.

good luck,
mike
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:19:05 PM EDT
Are you aiming consistently at the same spot? Aim dead center--dont worry about whats under the post or dot, just center it and let it go. You'd be surprised how many people I know shoot at any old part of the target as soon as their sights get on it. Aim small, miss small

You should be able to shoot 1 shot into the center of the head (about the sixe of your group) in 1.5 seconds or less at that distance, from high ready. That was the graduation requirment for the last class I took, and its pretty easy after a while. At 50 yards we'd shoot that drill 6 or 8 times and have a tight little group.

Practice practice practice! And get training or have someone who is trained look over how you do it. If you're doing something wrong, you dont want to practice a bad habit.

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:42:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By xmikex:
Practice. Practice. Practice. Especially important considering that you might be using it at work.

good luck,
mike



It's a shame, my dept. as a whole doesnt put a lot of emphasis on firearms training. My Lt. does and he is one of the few that supports all who train on their own. I bought three out of the four weapons that I carry around and also pump my own ammo through all of them accept the 9mm. I've got pistol shooting down but dont seem to be getting the big picture with the AR. I'm behind the power curve, and need to go to school. Thanks again for the tips guys.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:53:15 PM EDT
I would say that your first two shots were much more important than the rest.

Be sure to look at the first shots.

Work on tighter groups than that at 100.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:54:27 PM EDT
How's your stance? Elbows tucked in? Shoulders "rolled" forward?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:58:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By THellURider:
How's your stance? Elbows tucked in? Shoulders "rolled" forward?



My body is almost facing the target (same as pistol shooting; body armor faces target), elbows in, but didnt do anything special with my shoulders. Thanks; I'll have to look into that.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:01:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By wildearp:
I would say that your first two shots were much more important than the rest.

Be sure to look at the first shots.

Work on tighter groups than that at 100.





You know, I havent even fired it at 100 yet. Its only seen 7, 25, and 50; with the Aimpoint sighted in at 50. A group from a standing position would be a real nice to see.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 11:07:39 PM EDT
You will find a lot of folks talking big about their abilities, but it's easy to spot the BS.
Yeah, I can shoot 1 MOA all day long, standing, with Wolf.
Anyway, it's refreshing to see someone post the real deal. I went to a public range today and had to abide by their "no rapid fire" policy. I pushed the limit to 1-2 sec per shot and put 60 rounds into a target at the 50. It ain't pretty, but it's the real deal.

Hot dirty barrel, then 3 shots also at the 50.

It all depends on how you intend on using your weapon. I need reliability over sub MOA performance. I need to be able to fire a reasonable sized group consistently. I’m not a benchrest shooter by any stretch of the imagination.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 11:18:40 PM EDT


You know, I havent even fired it at 100 yet. Its only seen 7, 25, and 50; with the Aimpoint sighted in at 50. A group from a standing position would be a real nice to see.

The 50 yard zero with the Aimpoint makes sense for a patrol carbine...actually for most users the 50 yard zero makes sense. However, you do need to get some time in at the 100, even out to the 200, just so you can see what it/you can do.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 11:24:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Eric:
You will find a lot of folks talking big about their abilities, but it's easy to spot the BS.
Yeah, I can shoot 1 MOA all day long, standing, with Wolf.
Anyway, it's refreshing to see someone post the real deal. I went to a public range today and had to abide by their "no rapid fire" policy. I pushed the limit to 1-2 sec per shot and put 60 rounds into a target at the 50. It ain't pretty, but it's the real deal.
img.photobucket.com/albums/v503/AR15forme/K3B/P1010037.jpg
Hot dirty barrel, then 3 shots also at the 50.
img.photobucket.com/albums/v503/AR15forme/K3B/P1010038.jpg
It all depends on how you intend on using your weapon. I need reliability over sub MOA performance. I need to be able to fire a reasonable sized group consistently. I’m not a benchrest shooter by any stretch of the imagination.



Specs on your rifle?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 11:45:56 PM EDT
My step-father taught me to time my shots. When sighting payattention to the pattern that you make. Some do circles, some do figure eights. Others do whatever. Try putting the squeeze on the trigger and try touching it of as you pass the intended mark. It takes some practice. The idea is that it takes your mind and muscles off trying to hold on a spot but allowing the pattern to happen and touching off as it comes across the spot you want to hit. Just don't hammer the trigger, squeeze, relax after you pass and continue as you come on target again. He was an excellent shot and the Germans didn't get him. Trust me he tagged and bagged his fair share.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 1:05:59 AM EDT
Stop using a rested position unless you're zeroing. Otherwise the bench is useless. Once you're sighted in practice from combat positions, because in combat, there won't be a bench for you. And the first two shots reelly are all that count, I can't tell which were which, but you get the idea.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 2:16:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/4/2005 2:17:18 AM EDT by AWACER]

Originally Posted By Eric:


You know, I havent even fired it at 100 yet. Its only seen 7, 25, and 50; with the Aimpoint sighted in at 50. A group from a standing position would be a real nice to see.

The 50 yard zero with the Aimpoint makes sense for a patrol carbine...actually for most users the 50 yard zero makes sense. However, you do need to get some time in at the 100, even out to the 200, just so you can see what it/you can do.




Great shooting, thanks for the tips.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 2:16:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By river_rat:
My step-father taught me to time my shots. When sighting payattention to the pattern that you make. Some do circles, some do figure eights. Others do whatever. Try putting the squeeze on the trigger and try touching it of as you pass the intended mark. It takes some practice. The idea is that it takes your mind and muscles off trying to hold on a spot but allowing the pattern to happen and touching off as it comes across the spot you want to hit. Just don't hammer the trigger, squeeze, relax after you pass and continue as you come on target again. He was an excellent shot and the Germans didn't get him. Trust me he tagged and bagged his fair share.




Thanks bud.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 2:19:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By absit:
Stop using a rested position unless you're zeroing. Otherwise the bench is useless. Once you're sighted in practice from combat positions, because in combat, there won't be a bench for you. And the first two shots reelly are all that count, I can't tell which were which, but you get the idea.




The elbows and head area were benchrested just to check zero because I had popped off the accucam since shooting last to show someone how it worked. The whole chest area is from a standing position.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 2:25:27 AM EDT
keep shooting , but this isn't bad , I have shot with people that couldn't hit your target with the first ten shots
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 2:26:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By copdills:
keep shooting , but this isn't bad , I have shot with people that couldn't hit your target with the first ten shots



Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:42:26 AM EDT

Specs on your rifle?
This one was an Olympic Arms K3B (16" SS) Aimpoint ML2, shooting '86 SA surplus.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:04:17 AM EDT
Join a High Power club. The high masters will NOT judge you. They will coach you into a great shooter. They all know that you are competeing against yourself. You are the only reason you dont shoot a "Clean" score. (All Tens) They don't shoot "Clean" either, but they get damn close.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:00:31 AM EDT
The COM shots are too low. Keep them in an 8"-10" group in the chest. You want to hit an area that is roughly defined as a triangle with the nipples and the base of the neck being the 3 points that define the triangle.
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