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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/21/2004 5:35:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2004 6:01:24 PM EST by ChuckJaxFL]
This seems like an attractive light to me. The 15/100 lumen part does, at least. The only thing is... I've nothing to quantitatively compare 'lumens' to. Is that close to 14,000 farshnuklets?

I have a mini-mag and a 6D Maglite. What is the lumen rating on those two, so I'll have some relative numbers to compare?

Edited to add: And.... I'm assuming these are using the new Luxeon Star 5w LED's, right? How are they getting 100 lumens out of a LED rated for 65??

Link Posted: 10/21/2004 10:34:33 PM EST
SureFire do not use Luxeon Stars.
They use Luxeons (not mounted on Star bases).

The L2 does have a LuxeonV (or 5W Luxeon) and it is driven at a higher current on high then the L4 (at least to start with).
The L2 has been rated using the latest measuring equipment at 100 Lumens. There is some debate whether there is a difference between the L2 and L4 in visible terms (I believe there is based on lights I have). However, the L4's 65 Lumens was shown to be somewhat conservative because at the time it was hard to get accurate ratings from integrating spheres designed for incandescent light.

Bascially, it's complicated, but, the L2 is the most useful flashlight I've ever carried regardless of ratings.

Al
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 8:30:50 AM EST
Basically, if light was water, candlepower is depth of the pool; lumens is the total volume of water in the pool. Candlepower and lumens don't compare for this reason-- it's feet versus gallons.

So a narrow, tight beam would have more candlepower than a wide beam, even if both had the same lumen output.

As a rule of thumb, though, my 65 lumen E2 washes out a Mag 4D. I would expect the L2 to be demonstrably superiour to a Mag 4D-- smooth, even, white beam of incredible intensity.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 11:37:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By blikbok:
Basically, if light was water, candlepower is depth of the pool; lumens is the total volume of water in the pool. Candlepower and lumens don't compare for this reason-- it's feet versus gallons.



That's a brilliant and simple explination... thanks. So I can expect a brighter light out of the L2, but how far that light will reach is questionable. I wish I could find a "beamshot" comparison of them side by side at 70 feet or so.
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