Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 6/15/2007 6:23:56 AM EDT
I have read some of the threads on staking the castle nut vs using loctite. Staking obviously seems the best way to go however I haven't seen what angle the punch should be at to stake it correctly. Also how much hammering force should be used. I tried to stake it and just couldn't get enough metal displaced to keep it tight. I am just a little leary of pounding on my lower too hard. Thanks
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 6:27:48 AM EDT
Sorry can't help giving the applicable AR15 response here:

Get a BIGGER hammer......

mike
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 9:45:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AZA2:
I have read some of the threads on staking the castle nut vs using loctite. Staking obviously seems the best way to go however I haven't seen what angle the punch should be at to stake it correctly. Also how much hammering force should be used. I tried to stake it and just couldn't get enough metal displaced to keep it tight. I am just a little leary of pounding on my lower too hard. Thanks


I would NEVER stake the castle nut!!

That sucker is hard enough getting off after most companies (RRA for sure!) red loctite it.

It took me a torch and 1/2 hour to get mine off!

Staking it is unecessary, IMO...

It shouldnt loosen at all - and you may want to swap the stock out in the future.

Just my .02....
docgary
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:02:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2007 10:05:08 AM EDT by LoneWolfUSMC]
Staking the Castle nut is the way it SHOULD be done.

I wouldn't advise Red locktite. I reserve red for when I want something to be permenant. I really do not want to have to take a torch to an aluminum lower to get the nut off.


Originally Posted By docgary:
It shouldnt loosen at all - and you may want to swap the stock out in the future.


There are a lot of things that "shouldn't" happen, but do. When I am betting my life on a weapon working, I prefer to make sure things that "shouldn't" happen "can't" happen.

Do you think companies like Colt would go to the trouble of staking if it wasn't needed? It's what makes the difference between doing something "sorta OK" and doing it "right".
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:03:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By docgary:

Originally Posted By AZA2:
I have read some of the threads on staking the castle nut vs using loctite. Staking obviously seems the best way to go however I haven't seen what angle the punch should be at to stake it correctly. Also how much hammering force should be used. I tried to stake it and just couldn't get enough metal displaced to keep it tight. I am just a little leary of pounding on my lower too hard. Thanks


I would NEVER stake the castle nut!!

That sucker is hard enough getting off after most companies (RRA for sure!) red loctite it.

It took me a torch and 1/2 hour to get mine off!

Staking it is unecessary, IMO...

It shouldnt loosen at all - and you may want to swap the stock out in the future.

Just my .02....
docgary


if you are installing a stock for the first time on a rifle that will spend its life in a safe, next to your bed, or shooting at an air conditioned indoor range... then sure don't stake it...

if you plan on shooting your rifle with any real applications in mind (ie: taking a carbine class, using it as a duty weapon, etc) it should be staked. even after torquing down my castle nut when i put about 600 rounds through the rifle, doing reflexive fire shooting, and going from prone to kneeling to standing the castle nut loosened up and the stock started to rattle around...

the only loctite i use is blue on scope rings and rail systems, and at most a drop of red on gas block set screws...

drive the punch straight down, it will displace the metal. the first time i staked a castle nut i did at an angle and just dicked up the staking plate and the castle nut came right off... straight down, 2-3 strong hits with a decent hammer will do it...
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:04:13 AM EDT
I'm a big believer in staked castle nuts. I can't think of any reason I'd ever want to take it off once I have a good milspec receiver extension installed on my lower. Once it's staked properly, I know I'll never have to worry about it coming loose at a bad time. I staked mine with a good carbide punch. You don't have to hit it very hard since you're only dealing with aluminum. Just give the endplate a good, firm whack and you should displace enough metal to do the job.

Stickman has some great pictures of the process somewhere.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:28:39 AM EDT
ok...MEA CULPA MEA CULPA....

Everything is relative given its purpose.

1...My point of reference is using the rifle for plinking, target
or competition.

2...I'm usually look at putting on a different stock as a
modification that has a great chance to be changed in the future.
Hence, I DO NOT WANT A SEMI PERMANENT JOIN.

3...however, for real life, serious use as a weapon, absolutely
attach the stock the best way.

docgary

This struck a nerve because of a 1 hour exersize heating the castle nut with torch
afraid of doing damage to the lower's surface and metal


Link Posted: 6/15/2007 10:42:05 AM EDT
Thanks for the info guys. I'll get a carbide or similar punch and try it again.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 11:27:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By docgary:

This struck a nerve because of a 1 hour exersize heating the castle nut with torch
afraid of doing damage to the lower's surface and metal



you are contradicting yourself... a mechanical stake is like you said a "semi-permanent" method... you apply torque to the castle nut and tap the metal from the staking away from the castle nut and it will easily remove... replace the end plate and you are good to go...

red loctite (WHICH IS NOT THE SAME AS STAKING) is why you are spending all this time with a torch trying not to mess up your lower...
Top Top