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Posted: 7/23/2010 6:23:38 AM EST
I just installed a Spikes LPK and was not overly impressed with the quality.

The major problem is the trigger, which is very gritty and uneven pull.

Since I want a single stage trigger, I have to decide on either sending the trigger to Springfield for a trigger job or getting the Spikes battle trigger group. My concern is the battle trigger ... if it is even remotely like the present trigger than I would still have to have a trigger job.

Another (minor) point with the LPK is the mag release button. The serrations on the knurling are so sharp I could shave with it!
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 6:30:02 AM EST
I have both; they are both nice.

BS job is very crisp, but there are a lot of concerns about long-term reliability around here.

Spike's is nice, but had a lot more creep than BS's. I copied my Jard and put a set screw up from the grip hole to take out some of the creep; now I like it a little better than BS.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 6:33:31 AM EST
If you're going for maximum accuracy, the Battle Trigger's pull is a little heavy for that. For a general purpose gun, the BT is a great choice. Consistent pull, no grit.

My Bill Springfield trigger failed after less than 1000 rounds, and others have had similar experiences.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 7:15:48 AM EST
Get the Spike's, I've been reading way too many reports of BS worked triggers failing recently.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 7:25:57 AM EST
Spike's is nice, especially once broken in. Springfield jobs have had reports of doubling. I think he warranties his work, so that may not be too bad an issue. But check on that first. I know Spike's warranties everything for life.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 8:08:50 AM EST
I've formulated a hypothesis regarding the Bill Springfield triggers.

Many have had good results and longevity from his trigger jobs. Many have had good results that didn't last long. From what I can gather, it's always best to get a trigger that is designed to be the way that you want it to be. That way, the angles are cut on the parts and then the parts are hardened. When you get a trigger job done, the parts are cut AFTER the hardening process, so whether the trigger will last only a short while or a long time depends on how deep the hardening went on your particular parts and whether the guy doing the trigger job had to cut beyond the hardening to get the desired results. The problem is that the depth of the hardening varies from manufacturer to manufacturer and batch to batch, so you never know. On some parts you can actually go through the hardening by just polishing the parts with a dremel tool.

You can do one of two things, roll the dice, spend the $30 something dollars on the BS trigger job and see how it works out or you can just buy a new trigger. You could look at the Spike's "deluxe" trigger or whatever they call it for around $50 and then it goes up from there. When my BS trigger went south, I pulled a stock hammer out of my parts box and ordered a JP trigger from Midway for around $130. After about an hour of fitting, I got a very nice 4.5lb trigger. For around $175 you can get a Geiselle SSA trigger two stage and be done with it. You'll likely never have to worry about your trigger again. When using the SSA for precision work, I do notice a tiny bit of creep with a pretty clean break. It isn't like glass, but pretty darned clean none the less. I don't notice any creep and a very clean break for all other types of shooting.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 8:30:36 AM EST
I've done both the "15 minute trigger job", which requires no grinding, or used Timney drop-ins. Grinding on hardened parts (IMHO only) is a BAD idea. A little lapping/smoothing...OK, but if I'm really looking for a light, smooth trigger, I'll spend the loot for a trigger/hammer/disconnector that was designed that way.

There's been WAY too many reported issues with BS stuff doubling, and that, to me is unacceptable. You're dicking around with the thing that makes the rifle go "BANG", and it damn-well only go BANG when I want it to.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 9:43:08 AM EST

Originally Posted By RetLawman:
I've done both the "15 minute trigger job", which requires no grinding, or used Timney drop-ins. Grinding on hardened parts (IMHO only) is a BAD idea. A little lapping/smoothing...OK, but if I'm really looking for a light, smooth trigger, I'll spend the loot for a trigger/hammer/disconnector that was designed that way.

There's been WAY too many reported issues with BS stuff doubling, and that, to me is unacceptable. You're dicking around with the thing that makes the rifle go "BANG", and it damn-well only go BANG when I want it to.

Exactly what I was thinking, it's never a good idea to grind heat treated parts and remove the hardened surfaces. If they didn't need to be heat treated to begin with, the manufacturers wouldn't bother.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 9:46:44 AM EST
My go to lower has the Geiselle SSA. Buy once, cry once.

Love that trigger, I've got to save up for another one for my other lower.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 10:02:11 AM EST

Originally Posted By NE223:
My go to lower has the Geiselle SSA. Buy once, cry once.

Love that trigger, I've got to save up for another one for my other lower.


I agree, but OP is asking for a single stage. I've got a Geiselle DMR trigger on my favorite AR... the trigger is the main reason it's my favorite.

I'm going to eventually get SSA triggers for the rest. I'll never go back to a stock trigger again, these things are fantastic.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 10:05:50 AM EST
shoot the Spikes for a while. triggers of that quality need some break in time before they smooth out.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 11:13:54 AM EST
I just got a Mega trigger, which uses a stock hammer, and it is a sweet trigger once dialed in. Less that a hundred bones too.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 11:27:08 AM EST
A standard Single stage trigger ( I like M&A parts ) or the greissele SSA. Everything else is a waste of money in a "Hard use" rifle.

http://www.palmettostatearmory.com/593.php
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 11:57:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2010 12:44:28 PM EST by AK_Steve]
Originally Posted By T-TAC:
A standard Single stage trigger ( I like M&A parts ) or the greissele SSA. Everything else is a waste of money in a "Hard use" rifle.

http://www.palmettostatearmory.com/593.php


The battle trigger is a standard trigger, just with a NiB coating.

ETA: I can vouch for the battle trigger, a great improvement over an uncoated FCG. Mine has about a 1/8" of creep but it's smooooth. You don't even notice it when firing the rifle. It also breaks slightly lighter than standard and is more crisp.
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 2:09:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By rychencop:
shoot the Spikes for a while. triggers of that quality need some break in time before they smooth out.


These Spikes battle triggers get polished in quickly, at least mine did. I have custom triggers on a few bolt guns that are slick, these will never compare nor do I want this in my goto rifles. I will adapt to a little creep readily, and I want longevity in my FCG. I do like to work (polish) my standard FCG a little before I call them good. YMMV, but I feel the Spikes battle trigger group is perfect for my needs- I plan to buy more sets.

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