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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/29/2005 10:33:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:04:06 PM EDT
I have a friend in Florida who has had a very similiar expierence with his Springfield 6X. He ended up sending it back twice in 8-10 months. Last time I heard it was holding up fine now though. I have always heard good things about Sprinfield's customer service. I'm sure they will take care of you.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:10:29 PM EDT
I've heard that this is only an issue with the "Gov't" reticle, or whatever they call the one you have. My Dad's Springfield scope is with the Mil-Dot reticle, and he's never had any trouble, even when it was on the .300WINMAG. Good luck, I'm sure SA will take care of you.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:24:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:30:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 6:32:45 PM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 9:29:06 PM EDT



Edit-mine is the gov't reticle, wonder if that is part of the problem-hmmm



Pretty sure that's correct.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 6:48:43 AM EDT
The problem is that the image tube inside is rotating under actual use. This occurs because the image tube is brass, and the retaining screws at the rear of the main tube assembly that are suppposed to hold it in a verticle position are not holding tight enough to keep it from shifting. The front of the image tube is suspended inside the main tube between the verticle and horizontal adjustment towers and a spring loaded keeper at about the 8 o'clock position, and the rear is in a two piece brass gimball assembly that allows the front to shift under adustment while keeping the rear in place. What is even more frustrating is when the crosshair shifts one direction and the bubble level goes the other way. I am way too familiar with the inside of this exact scope because I own one. I sent it back twice for a shifting reticle. Both times it came back straight, but would not survive 50 rounds of .308 before moving once again. The third trip brought it back with the crosshair straight, but the level off-center.

I then decided enough was enough and took it apart myself. The work on the image tube up 'til then looked like something just short of third graders using paste and popsicle sticks, including a liberally applied amount of hot glue trying to get the bubble level assembly to stay put. I spent at least four hours on mine and it holds fine now. I would suggest avoiding this scope unless you feel in a real do-it-yourselfer mood, and don't feel intimidated taking one apart. The real problem with reticle alignment is that what looks to be good size and easy to read when everything is assembled is actually almost microscopic when taken apart. This requires that each time you attempt to align the reticle, you must assemble a significant part of the occular end of the tube just to check alignment, then take it apart to freeze everything or to try alignment again.

Springfield was very accomodating in taking it back for repair, and it was never gone for more than 4 days, but this is negated by the fact that it never was really fixed.

I'm tired just thinking about it again.

regards,
Dan
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 6:52:58 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 9:28:52 PM EDT
I could never get used to the eye relief on mine- It was impossible for me to keep a clear view. Just the slightest move of my head, and I mean slight- the reticle would start to blur bad especially around the edges. I had picks of this problem in the famous tacked "views through scopes" thread, but the photos are down now. It drove me so crazy I immediately sold it new without even bothering to try a test shoot with it.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 10:36:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/30/2005 10:37:51 PM EDT by Zardoz]
A friend of mine bought the gen III mildot reticle scope with illuminated ret....all the goodies. Damned thing went less than 50 rds, and then had a "white-out" (for want of a better description); upon inspection, we could hear one (or more) of the interior lenses rolling around in it.

He called SA, who graciously and very quickly replaced the scope, which he then sold and got a Leupold.
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