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Posted: 6/15/2009 5:20:15 AM EST
I cleaned the guns probably 2 weeks back and they were pretty wet when put away, went to the range yesterday and fired about 150rds through each and started to get FTE cleaned a small amount with a little more CLP and fired about 50rds/each and then went home.

What is the consensus on how wet the AR should be prior to hitting the range? Dripping wet? a slight film of CLP? If you leave them in the safe for an extended period of time how often should you relube them so they stay wet enough should the need arise?

Thanks

J
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:27:15 AM EST
I generally like to talk dirty to my bolt carrier groups to ensure they are dripping.

CLP sucks, by the way. I have just started testing Slip 200 EWL and found the BCG is still soaking wet after 120 rounds. I also have a sample of Weaponshield CLP I'm going to be testing.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:33:40 AM EST
I make sure my bcg and upper receiver are wet when i go to the range and ive yet to have an ejection problem. My rifles seem to stay cleaner when they have a good liberal coat of oil. I do however clean the oil out of the barrel prior to shooting.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:34:39 AM EST
interesting, I'd be ecstatic to find something better than CLP. it works MUCH better than rem oil on the handgun but not so great on the AR. What about Mobil-1 motor oil? I've heard a few things about that here and there
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:35:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By revolver145:
I make sure my bcg and upper receiver are wet when i go to the range and ive yet to have an ejection problem. My rifles seem to stay cleaner when they have a good liberal coat of oil. I do however clean the oil out of the barrel prior to shooting.


that's the thing, if I NEED the AR at home for whatever reason I do not want to be fussing around at 2:00am making sure it is wet....
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:37:36 AM EST
Try out some Slip 2000 EWL. Good stuff.

Been using it for a few months now and like it way better then CLP.

And i run my BCG dripping wet also.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:38:44 AM EST
I've seen lube in the chamber cause FTEs So you want to keep that not so wet in there.

On the bolt and carrier I just give it a "sheen"
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:42:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 5:47:30 AM EST by USMC-Helo]
I'm sure there are lots of different opinions. Personally, I can see advantage to having the weapon very wet during storage, wipe it down before going to the range. To much oil rarely, if ever causes any problems, so don't worry if you're of the "keep your weapons always at the ready" mentality.

What oil and how much depends on the environment, the Army just did a test for the EXTREME DUST environment of the Mid-East and found excessive CLP in the rifle produced much less stoppages than the standard oiling. Many people believe some of the alternate lubes that keep the weapon drier work better in the dust. (Oil catches and holds dust, and gunks up, lots of oil can wash some of the dirt away, so it makes sense in the extreme dust environment, going one or the other extreme could work better than the standard light lube).

Most people will tell you the moderate areas of the U.S. excess CLP doesn't hurt, but does just trap more carbon during firing and gets the weapon much dirtier than the good light oiling, the standard light oiling the weapons functions perfectly and stays cleaner longer.

The Maintenance & Cleaning Board has a Sticky on it with the recommended proper lubing of the rifle, it would be good to check. For the most part its a single drop on the axis of moving parts and a light film on some of the BCG parts, with a medium film on the carrier.

Active Duty, after a lot of firing and the weapon started to get dry, we used to put a single drop of CLP in one of the vent holes of the BCG (where the bolt rings slide over), and were advised more than a drop would probably hurt more than help.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 5:52:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By JeepMP:
interesting, I'd be ecstatic to find something better than CLP. it works MUCH better than rem oil on the handgun but not so great on the AR. What about Mobil-1 motor oil? I've heard a few things about that here and there


Get some SLIP 2000 EWL for your BCG and thank me later.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:01:30 AM EST
Try synthetic motor oil 1QT should last forever . I Don't run mine dripping wet there is a chart somewhere on this site that shows where to lube your AR15 BCG .

I have never had a FTF other than with a Mag malfunction .But I have to admit that I usually do not shoot more than 100 rounds when I do go to the range .
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:03:07 AM EST
I've always used Hoppes lube and have had no problem at all.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:08:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 6:40:05 AM EST by JeepMP]
FYI for those who have not seen it, here is the link to the lube points on the AR as posted by QUIB.Link

edit to fix link
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:22:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By JeepMP:
FYI for those who have not seen it, here is the link to the lube points on the AR as posted by QUIB.Link


working link

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:24:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 6:28:38 AM EST by ma96782]
Personally.........I wouldn't leave it "wet." Wet attracks dirt and grime, not to mention that some gun oils will congeal when dried.

I learned that lesson the hard way.

Your rifle should be able to function with "just enough" (see the link above).

I wonder........has your rifle been "broken in?"

Aloha, Mark
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:26:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By 45FMJoe:
I generally like to talk dirty to my bolt carrier groups to ensure they are dripping.

CLP sucks, by the way. I have just started testing Slip 200 EWL and found the BCG is still soaking wet after 120 rounds. I also have a sample of Weaponshield CLP I'm going to be testing.




Agree. there are BETTER lubes out their then Brake-free(that are also NON-TOXIC).I used SLIP2000 EWL for about a year or two.. Weapon Shield is a better lube then Slip.Once you TRY it you will NOT go back to Slip.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:29:46 AM EST
Now back to the "wet" question,I run mine VERY wet(dripping) and it runs fine.IMHO its hard to OVERLUBE an AR-15.I clean every 2000 to 3000 rounds if not LONGER and have done so for YEARS.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:30:28 AM EST
I have been a subscriber of the "oil the part then wipe it down, leaving a thin film " method for a long time. I was having a Helluva time with my AR's and had just about given up on them.

I started a thread here about getting rid of my AR's and going to AKs cause my AR's, all of them, ran crappy.


well after the e-lectures I got from everyone telling me that was retarded, it was determined that I was running my bolts too dry. They were lubed but lubed like you'd lube a bolt on a bolt action rifle, just thin film.


I have started spraying CLP directly into my bolt when I am shooting, literally letting it run out the bottom of the magwell. I have not had a failure to fire since that day. Not one. I have ruined several shirts, and with the suppressor on it I look like a racoon after a lot of shooting (I'm lefty so get hosed in the face with blowback) but no failures to fire.

so I run my bolt extremely wet. I would like to find something better than CLP but not sure where to get Slip2000. nobody carries it locally and to much of a PITA to order over the net....
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:32:36 AM EST
I won't say CLP is not a good product to use, I've been using the Slip2000 and have liked the results better. Lite oil on the points of contact and a drop in the hole.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:34:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 6:34:16 AM EST by Captains1911]
Originally Posted By 45FMJoe:
Originally Posted By JeepMP:
interesting, I'd be ecstatic to find something better than CLP. it works MUCH better than rem oil on the handgun but not so great on the AR. What about Mobil-1 motor oil? I've heard a few things about that here and there


Get some SLIP 2000 EWL for your BCG and thank me later.


+1. I soak my BCG in Slip 200 EWL, CLP seems to dry up even after storage, whereas EWL does not.

QUIB swears by Breakfree LP for lubing the BCG, it's the same as Breakfree CLP without the cleaning agent, so it's thicker, but I have never tried it.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:37:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By ma96782:
Personally.........I wouldn't leave it "wet." Wet attracks dirt and grime, not to mention that some gun oils will congeal when dried.

I learned that lesson the hard way.

Your rifle should be able to function with "just enough" (see the link above).

I wonder........has your rifle been "broken in?"

Aloha, Mark


This is just wrong. Wet guns will run better than dry guns, period.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:38:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 6:44:03 AM EST by N2CH_556]
Originally Posted By crashburnrepeat:
I have been a subscriber of the "oil the part then wipe it down, leaving a thin film " method for a long time. I was having a Helluva time with my AR's and had just about given up on them.

I started a thread here about getting rid of my AR's and going to AKs cause my AR's, all of them, ran crappy.

well after the e-lectures I got from everyone telling me that was retarded, it was determined that I was running my bolts too dry. They were lubed but lubed like you'd lube a bolt on a bolt action rifle, just thin film.

I have started spraying CLP directly into my bolt when I am shooting, literally letting it run out the bottom of the magwell. I have not had a failure to fire since that day. Not one. I have ruined several shirts, and with the suppressor on it I look like a racoon after a lot of shooting (I'm lefty so get hosed in the face with blowback) but no failures to fire.

so I run my bolt extremely wet. I would like to find something better than CLP but not sure where to get Slip2000. nobody carries it locally and to much of a PITA to order over the net....


This sounds too familiar.

Yeah, I run mine sloppy wet and will give another vote for the method posted by QUIB.

Longtime Breakfree CLP (& LP) user, but recently started trying SLip 2000 EWL, Definitely seems more slick and longer lasting, in my limited experience.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:39:12 AM EST
Originally Posted By crashburnrepeat:
I have been a subscriber of the "oil the part then wipe it down, leaving a thin film " method for a long time. I was having a Helluva time with my AR's and had just about given up on them.

I started a thread here about getting rid of my AR's and going to AKs cause my AR's, all of them, ran crappy.


well after the e-lectures I got from everyone telling me that was retarded, it was determined that I was running my bolts too dry. They were lubed but lubed like you'd lube a bolt on a bolt action rifle, just thin film.


I have started spraying CLP directly into my bolt when I am shooting, literally letting it run out the bottom of the magwell. I have not had a failure to fire since that day. Not one. I have ruined several shirts, and with the suppressor on it I look like a racoon after a lot of shooting (I'm lefty so get hosed in the face with blowback) but no failures to fire.

so I run my bolt extremely wet. I would like to find something better than CLP but not sure where to get Slip2000. nobody carries it locally and to much of a PITA to order over the net....


It's worth the hassle to order it over the net.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:39:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By 45FMJoe:
Originally Posted By ma96782:
Personally.........I wouldn't leave it "wet." Wet attracks dirt and grime, not to mention that some gun oils will congeal when dried.

I learned that lesson the hard way.

Your rifle should be able to function with "just enough" (see the link above).

I wonder........has your rifle been "broken in?"

Aloha, Mark


This is just wrong. Wet guns will run better than dry guns, period.


Once again, I have to agree with Joe. With lots of guns, like pistols, too much lube is worse, but with ARs you really can't overlube the BCG, wet is better.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:50:13 AM EST
I just use a qtip coated with clp and mop the area with metal to metal contact(area without parkerization).

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:54:44 AM EST
I run my BCG's pretty damn wet too. Its not quite dripping sloppy wet, but its definitely got a nice coat on it. I've been using CLP, but I'm going to order some weapon shield and try that exclusively for a while to see how it works out.

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:58:02 AM EST
cool, lots of good info. I'll see where I can find some other lubes and try them out. Thing is the best/closest range is 1.5 hours away and I don't get a out as often as I'd like. not to mention ammo prices....

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:01:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 7:08:45 AM EST by USMC-Helo]
Originally Posted By ma96782:
Personally.........I wouldn't leave it "wet." Wet attracks dirt and grime, not to mention that some gun oils will congeal when dried.

I learned that lesson the hard way.

Never seen that in the East Coast of the U.S. with CLP, saw it in Iraq with the extreme dust, there was NO where to store the weapon (well we carried it with us everywhere) that it wouldn't get exposed to dust to get in the oil, even just sitting in the armory, the Dust gets everywhere. For me it was the M9, but same concept, my Marines carrying M16 saw the same thing. I kept the M9 much drier than I normally did and it did collect a lot less dirt.

Wet gets better coverage and flows into spots you may have missed, it gets in the nooks and crannies to protect and the oil continues to clean as the rifle sits, lifting and suspending the dirt/carbon in the oil.

Different oil and environments will produce different results, you have to adjust accordingly. Probably just as much argument for/against, the oil/environment may make a difference where one is better than the other, but the opposite for someone else.

I've been using Mil-Comm TW25b on my pistols, may start on the AR, its a very light grease that wipes away or works into the metal to leave a waxy coat that collects less dirt and dust than oil, seems to lube just fine, but the demands for pistols can be a lot less than an AR. Since its expensive, I don't wipe down the whole weapon with it, like CLP, so I worry about corrosion since its stored pretty dry, I haven't seen any yet, probably been about 6 months since I switched to the TW25b on the pistols. With the .22lr pistol, where you shoot 400 rounds in an afternoon and the rimfire cartridges start to misfeed from dirt, I've found the dirt and mis-feeds start a lot later using the TW25b than standard CLP. Again, Pistols are different than AR's, so you may NOT get the same results if you try it in an AR.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:05:28 AM EST
the good thing about CLP is that it does not cause dust to stick, the dust may absorb some CLP but it still falls away... Rem oil retains the dust where it contacted the oil. I like CLP much better. The CLP that comes in a drip bottle is thicker then the spray can and lasts longer in place. I found no disadvantage to lots of CLP.

I tried Mobile One because of the guys on this forum and discovered it holds dirt like rem oil. Therefore the Mobile One caused buildup of sludge. I did not like it at all.

I recently got some Slip 2000. I have not used it enough to say for sure, but so far I am liking it better then CLP.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:14:02 AM EST
Hmmm, CLP collects dust and dirt, I don't have a lot of experience with other gun oils, but now that I think about it, lubes on my lawnmower, bikes, other equipment, often motor oil, does seem to collect a lot more dirt than I noticed with CLP. It may be a matter of CLP collecting a lot less, but the dust dirt will get in the CLP.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:14:22 AM EST
how bout new ar,s dont you think first 300 rounds dripping wet upper mobil one bcg and buffer assembly
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:24:24 AM EST
i put a layer of high-temp wheel bearing grease on the easy to reach parts: charging handle, bolt, carrier. I drop of Slip 2000 in each of the holes on the side of the BCG and on the other smaller moving parts. The grease works well for me because my rifle sits in its bag most of the time. It comes out to get shot and the grease doesn't slowly drip off the parts. The rifle isn't out of the bag for more than a couple days continuously.

I think what this comes down to is how you use your weapon and in what conditions. There isn't a 'perfect' way to do things. Try different methods and see what works for you.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:42:33 AM EST
I don't have much experience with ARs, as I am building my first one now. With my pistols, I put lubricants on in layers and plan to do the same with my AR. Here's what I mean;

After cleaning I put on a coat of heavy duty industrial silicone spray and let sit for about an hour. You can find it at any automotive store cheap, I paid $3.39 for 10oz (be careful, getting some on flooring like wood or tile will cause wife to slide around for at least a week, ask me how I know).

Then I put on a light coating of RemOil w/teflon or CLP, what ever I have in my hand at the time and let sit for 30 minutes to an hour.

Then its a liberal coating (not dripping, but very wet) of Mobil 1 5w 20 full synthetic motor oil.

Re-assemble and shoot like crazy. Sometimes I clean after each range session, for several sessions in a row. Sometimes, when I'm lazy, it might go 3 or 4 sessions before cleaning again and I shoot 300 to 500 rounds per session.

I have also been very impressed with the NP3 coating, from ROBAR, I got on my HKP2000. It is a nickel finish with teflon "fused" in on a molecular level. It is self-lubricating and they claim you can run it dry, but I don't. The finish is very slick. I have thought about getting the BCG finished with it when I am done building my AR, but am worried about them tearing the BCG apart after it has already been properly staked.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:44:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By the-fly:
I run my BCG's pretty damn wet too. Its not quite dripping sloppy wet, but its definitely got a nice coat on it. I've been using CLP, but I'm going to order some weapon shield and try that exclusively for a while to see how it works out.



You will like Weapon Shield.. its one heck of a lube.. and it smells good too(sweet smell)
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:46:08 AM EST
+1 for the Mobil 1.

If you don't feel some oil spray on your face when shootin, it ain't wet enough.



Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:51:08 AM EST
Originally Posted By USMC-Helo:
Originally Posted By ma96782:
Personally.........I wouldn't leave it "wet." Wet attracks dirt and grime, not to mention that some gun oils will congeal when dried.

I learned that lesson the hard way.

Never seen that in the East Coast of the U.S. with CLP, saw it in Iraq with the extreme dust, there was NO where to store the weapon (well we carried it with us everywhere) that it wouldn't get exposed to dust to get in the oil, even just sitting in the armory, the Dust gets everywhere. For me it was the M9, but same concept, my Marines carrying M16 saw the same thing. I kept the M9 much drier than I normally did and it did collect a lot less dirt.

Wet gets better coverage and flows into spots you may have missed, it gets in the nooks and crannies to protect and the oil continues to clean as the rifle sits, lifting and suspending the dirt/carbon in the oil.

Different oil and environments will produce different results, you have to adjust accordingly. Probably just as much argument for/against, the oil/environment may make a difference where one is better than the other, but the opposite for someone else.

I've been using Mil-Comm TW25b on my pistols, may start on the AR, its a very light grease that wipes away or works into the metal to leave a waxy coat that collects less dirt and dust than oil, seems to lube just fine, but the demands for pistols can be a lot less than an AR. Since its expensive, I don't wipe down the whole weapon with it, like CLP, so I worry about corrosion since its stored pretty dry, I haven't seen any yet, probably been about 6 months since I switched to the TW25b on the pistols. With the .22lr pistol, where you shoot 400 rounds in an afternoon and the rimfire cartridges start to misfeed from dirt, I've found the dirt and mis-feeds start a lot later using the TW25b than standard CLP. Again, Pistols are different than AR's, so you may NOT get the same results if you try it in an AR.


*AHEM*

http://www.militarytimes.com/news/2007/07/army_carbine_lubrication_070716/


Heavy lubrication shown to improve M16, M4 effectiveness

By Matthew Cox - Staff writer
Posted : Monday Jul 16, 2007 17:34:05 EDT

Army weapons officials might have found a way to improve the M16 family’s performance in the desert.

“Dust chamber” tests at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., last year show that M16 rifles and M4 carbines perform dramatically better when the weapon’s bolt assembly is heavily lubricated.

During each phase of the two-part “system assessment” at Army Test and Evaluation Command, testers fired 60,000 rounds through 10 weapon samples of each model.

Treated with light lubrication, new M16A4s and M4s, performed poorly in the extreme dust and sand conditions of the test, according to a January report from ATEC.

But when testers applied a heavy coat of lubrication to the weapons, the test results showed a “significant improvement.”

Out of the 60,000 rounds fired in each phase, the M4 stoppage-rate dropped from 9,836 with light lubrication to 678 with heavy lubrication.

The M16A4 stoppage-rate dropped from 2,124 with light lubrication to 507 with heavy lubrication, results show.

For years, Army weapons officials have preached to soldiers to virtues of applying a light coat of lubrication during weapons maintenance.

But the test results reinforce a recent change in weapons maintenance guidance Army units are practicing in Iraq and Afghanistan, said Col. Carl Lipsit, project manager for Soldier Weapons.

At the request of Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., the Army will conduct a similar dust-chamber test in August, pitting the M4 against the Heckler and Koch 416, the H&K XM8 and FNH USA’s Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle.

All of the participating weapons will be treated with a heavy coat of lubrication during the test, Lipsit said.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:01:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 8:03:07 AM EST by subterfugeinc]
I run Machine Gunners Lube, and make sure the BCG has a good coating. I don't get it wet to the point that it is running out of the magwell or anything but I use enough that if pull it out, the whole thing is wet, but maybe not dripping. Since it doesn't seem to burn off, the rifle stays lubed. The other thing about it is that it leaves much less residue than other lubes. I have seen pictures of a weapon that was fired only a few times (IIRC, it was like 15) and the inside is covered in grime, much dirtier than mine, which has over 500 rounds and has not has any other maintenance than 1 or 2 reapplications of MGL when putting it away after shooting. I know, not a ton of rounds, but I didn't really understand why people where always talking about how filthy ARs are until I saw that pic. I have moved all of my weapons to MGL.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:12:21 AM EST
Gun Butter
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:14:45 AM EST
WS CLP all over the front half the BCG and a light coat on the parts of the bolt. Good to go. Doesn't really attract dirt or dust and doesn't dry out.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:20:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 8:22:08 AM EST by utahvarminter]
Was it Pat Rogers who wrote the article on M4 Lubrication?
If I am remembering right, he said in a pinch, you can lube it with Vagisil...
Now, why a soldier in the field would be carrying that around, I don't know...

I'll see if I can find it.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:32:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By utahvarminter:
Was it Pat Rogers who wrote the article on M4 Lubrication?
If I am remembering right, he said in a pinch, you can lube it with Vagisil...
Now, why a soldier in the field would be carrying that around, I don't know...

I'll see if I can find it.


In that same article he says a wet, dirty tgun will run but a dry, dirty gun will not.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:41:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 8:50:26 AM EST by Captains1911]
Originally Posted By offshorebear:
WS CLP all over the front half the BCG and a light coat on the parts of the bolt. Good to go. Doesn't really attract dirt or dust and doesn't dry out.


Here it is again: http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=7&t=433730

"G" stands for "GENEROUS", not light. This topic has been covered numerous times, and it's a well known fact by now that ARs much prefer heavy lubrication on the bolt and BCG (especially the bolt) versus light, but people still feel the need to post incorrect and misleading info here. I assume those who don't think it requires generous lube are those that may go out 2-3x a year and shoot less than 100 rds each trip, and for those small amounts of ammo, it probably doesn't need that much, but when you start shooting a lot of rounds, wet guns perform better than dry ones, period.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:49:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 8:49:46 AM EST by Captains1911]
Originally Posted By xenith:
how bout new ar,s dont you think first 300 rounds dripping wet upper mobil one bcg and buffer assembly


Age doesn't matter.

The buffer assembly does not require any lube. A light coat on the buffer spring and/or inside the buffer tube won't hurt, but is not mandatory.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:54:01 AM EST
If I'm not going to be using a rifle for a while, I put grease in it.


It might not be the best if you're going to run 1,000 rounds... But it isn't going to be dry if you need to run a few magazines through at a moment's notice.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:59:09 AM EST
I usually clean everything with a heavy application of CLP and then wipe off all the excess. It is oily to the touch but not dripping wet. The carrier in CLP evaporates and it should be relubed every 3 months though I have gone longer with no issues. I have never had any issues in many years doing this.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:12:38 AM EST
I wrote a longer reply but then I saw what that diagram refers to light and generous as. My definintion of light is their definition of generous. Generous to me means dripping wet. I let the excess drip off. The only thing I do really light is the firing pin and bolt fact. For the firing pin I put a drop or two on my finger and wipe it all over the pin.

It also would depend on your choice of lube. If I was just using a CLP that evaporated obviosly you need to go heavier than something that stays put. I guess that doesn't matter if you really use your rifle and do it every night.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:31:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By utahvarminter:
Was it Pat Rogers who wrote the article on M4 Lubrication?
If I am remembering right, he said in a pinch, you can lube it with Vagisil...


Every time I read this post, my mind goes into the gutter, but that's probably the right analogy for how wet your AR should be.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:47:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 9:51:21 AM EST by MikefromTX]
Everyone else has chimed in., so I will, too.

I haven't had as much experience with AR's as many of you guys, but I would say this:

- DON'T use motor oil on a weapon. It's too heavy a viscosity and it will build up and burn into carbon sludge. Synthetics (like Mobil 1) introduce even more opportunities for chemical decomposition. Your AR isn't a small-block Chevy engine and it has different needs
- Running a weapon literally dripping wet (like some of you suggest) isn't necessary and isn't advisable unless you're in the sandbox and are flushing out sand. Some penetrants in oils/cleaners will kill primers, and too much oil in the bore or chamber can cause stuck cases or kabooms in severe cases
- I personally find combination cleaners and oils (like CLP) suffer from some evaporation (of the carrier) and don't leave a sufficient layer of lube on the parts. I use it, but them I oil the weapon with something else

Don't embarrass the rest of us at the range by hauling out an AR that is dripping oil out of the magwell and splattering oil in your face with every shot. Sorry, but that's just silly.

.
.

ETA: This is intended for the 97% of us who do not run carbine courses or shoot bad guys in foreign lands. If you're blowing 5,000 rounds through your rifle in a day, or are using your AR to save your neck, you need to go to extraordinary lengths to keep it functional. But yours is not the kind of shooting conditions most of us experience, and there's no need for us to lube like you.

.
.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:00:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 10:00:52 AM EST by 45FMJoe]
Originally Posted By MikefromTX:
Everyone else has chimed in., so I will, too.

I haven't had as much experience with AR's as many of you guys, but I would say this:

- DON'T use motor oil on a weapon. It's too heavy a viscosity and it will build up and burn into carbon sludge. Synthetics (like Mobil 1) introduce even more opportunities for chemical decomposition. Your AR isn't a small-block Chevy engine and it has different needs
- Running a weapon literally dripping wet (like some of you suggest) isn't necessary and isn't advisable unless you're in the sandbox and are flushing out sand. Some penetrants in oils/cleaners will kill primers, and too much oil in the bore or chamber can cause stuck cases or kabooms in severe cases
- I personally find combination cleaners and oils (like CLP) suffer from some evaporation (of the carrier) and don't leave a sufficient layer of lube on the parts. I use it, but them I oil the weapon with something else

Don't embarrass the rest of us at the range by hauling out an AR that is dripping oil out of the magwell and splattering oil in your face with every shot. Sorry, but that's just silly.

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ETA: This is intended for the 97% of us who do not run carbine courses or shoot bad guys in foreign lands. If you're blowing 5,000 rounds through your rifle in a day, or are using your AR to save your neck, you need to go to extraordinary lengths to keep it functional. But yours is not the kind of shooting conditions most of us experience, and there's no need for us to lube like you.

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I use SLIP 2000 on my BCG and have a clean face after firing, and I keep it wet. I use CLP on the rest of the weapon, but wipe it down to a light film. I want my weapon to function, I don't live in a great part of town and I depend on my 85lb Airedale Terrier to alert me to danger and my Colt LE6920 to protect me from danger.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:08:25 AM EST
Originally Posted By crashburnrepeat:
I have started spraying CLP directly into my bolt when I am shooting, literally letting it run out the bottom of the magwell. I have not had a failure to fire since that day. Not one. I have ruined several shirts, and with the suppressor on it I look like a racoon after a lot of shooting (I'm lefty so get hosed in the face with blowback) but no failures to fire.

so I run my bolt extremely wet.


I ran my bolt this wet ONE TIME and was cured from this bullshit lame brain idea. I also purchased a gas buster charging handle and IT HELPED ALOT! Anyway. People, don't run it this wet.

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:11:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By MikefromTX:
Everyone else has chimed in., so I will, too.

I haven't had as much experience with AR's as many of you guys, but I would say this:

- DON'T use motor oil on a weapon. It's too heavy a viscosity and it will build up and burn into carbon sludge. Synthetics (like Mobil 1) introduce even more opportunities for chemical decomposition. Your AR isn't a small-block Chevy engine and it has different needs
- Running a weapon literally dripping wet (like some of you suggest) isn't necessary and isn't advisable unless you're in the sandbox and are flushing out sand. Some penetrants in oils/cleaners will kill primers, and too much oil in the bore or chamber can cause stuck cases or kabooms in severe cases
- I personally find combination cleaners and oils (like CLP) suffer from some evaporation (of the carrier) and don't leave a sufficient layer of lube on the parts. I use it, but them I oil the weapon with something else

Don't embarrass the rest of us at the range by hauling out an AR that is dripping oil out of the magwell and splattering oil in your face with every shot. Sorry, but that's just silly.

.
.

ETA: This is intended for the 97% of us who do not run carbine courses or shoot bad guys in foreign lands. If you're blowing 5,000 rounds through your rifle in a day, or are using your AR to save your neck, you need to go to extraordinary lengths to keep it functional. But yours is not the kind of shooting conditions most of us experience, and there's no need for us to lube like you.

.
.


There are many who will disagree with you on the use of motor oil, personally, i have never tried it.
http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=7&t=425955
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:54:23 AM EST
I would too...Mobil-1 20w50 for me, on everything in my safe. I wouldn't switch if you gave me a whole case of "something far superior".
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