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Posted: 9/4/2005 11:19:43 AM EDT
I'm right handed, but am left eye dominant. I shoot right handed and close my left eye when shooting my A2 20" Bushmaster. Am I OK with open iron sights, or better off with a flattop A3 with optics due to my "situation"...???
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 11:25:05 AM EDT
I do the same thing. I just close my Left eye.
When I'm using pistols sights, I practice using the first "set" that my eyes see, even when they aren't the clearest in the picture.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 11:33:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 11:46:13 AM EDT
Just do what I did, learn to shoot left handed......


occasionally I close my left eye and shoot right handed, but that does not give me as clear a picture and my accuracy seems to suffer because of it
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 11:54:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tweak:
Aimpoint



What is Aimpoint? FWIW I have this too and I am learning to shoot with both eyes open. For some reason I can not close [wink] my right eye and I'm left eye dominate.

Patty
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 12:00:56 PM EDT
I have the same problem. I just close or partially close my left eye (kinda squint) when shooting most times. I wear an eye patch on my left eye when shooting highpower, because closing my left eye causes my right eye to partially close, affecting my sight picture.

Optics do help this (Aimpoints, EOTechs, Etc). I respectfully disagree with learning to shoot with the opposite hand (you've trained your brain and body your entire life to be more coordinated with one hand, don't think you will ever be as good with the other one without literally years of work - if ever). Closing one eye or squinting it is a much simpler solution.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 12:29:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TacticalPenguin:
Just do what I did, learn to shoot left handed......


I wish it was that easy. Almost every firearm made is designed for the left handed shooter. I would rather train my eye to adjust than the rest of my body. Even though I write with my left hand, everything else is done with the right.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 1:06:16 PM EDT
Watch the movie "Firebirds" sometime if you haven't seen it. They have an interesting (if hollywood) approach to fixing this.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 1:36:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ExParatrooper:
Watch the movie "Firebirds" sometime if you haven't seen it. They have an interesting (if hollywood) approach to fixing this.



OK. Please don't make me watch a movie for the answers. Can we get a synopsis? I'll be real upset if I watch the whole movie for 3 seconds of advice, and the rest of the movie sucks (I coulda watched something better, or got something done that was worthwhile - you know). And then factor in the wife telling me once again . . . . . "I'm not letting you pick the movies we rent anymore." God forbid she find out I took the advice of someone I never met on the INTERNET!!!

Save me the hassle, and just tell us what happened.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 1:39:41 PM EDT
I write, pistol shoot, and golf right handed. I shoot a rifle and shoot pool left handed. I so confused

I use my right eye for pistol shooting and my left eye for rifle shooting. Can't really determine a dominant eye. I can shoot a rifle equally well right or left handed, but prefer left handed and more natural.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:23:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By webbb01:
I'm right handed, but am left eye dominant. I shoot right handed and close my left eye when shooting my A2 20" Bushmaster. Am I OK with open iron sights, or better off with a flattop A3 with optics due to my "situation"...???



I have the same issues - although from the other side

Are you OK with open/irons? Yes.

Are you better off with optics on the A3?

Yes also, but with this option you will almost be forced to your dominant eye shooting position.

The ACOG for example is most difficult- and never quickly- brought to target using the weak eye

short answer- learn to shoot from the other side with optics, or stick with irons
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:39:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SPDSNYPR:

Originally Posted By ExParatrooper:
Watch the movie "Firebirds" sometime if you haven't seen it. They have an interesting (if hollywood) approach to fixing this.


Save me the hassle, and just tell us what happened.


They attached a parascope type device to Cage's right eye and a patch over the other and made him drive around in a Humvee. IIRC
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:40:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By Tweak:
Aimpoint



What is Aimpoint? FWIW I have this too and I am learning to shoot with both eyes open. For some reason I can not close [wink] my right eye and I'm left eye dominate.

Patty



An Aimpoint is a red dot sight you use with both eyes open. I have an M2 and it works great.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:46:40 PM EDT
Do you wear glasses ?

Talk to your doctor and tell them what you need.


My wife has had the same problem but after her last prescription change now it is corrected...

gotta be the prescription.


LB
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 3:00:56 PM EDT
lol, i'm the opposite of you. Right eye, left handed. This works out kinda good for me. I shoot the rifle right handed, and sidearm on my left side. Faster switching to the sidearm for me.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 3:54:04 PM EDT
I have a friend with this problem, he looks like a retard when he shoots he gets up like he is going to shoot righty, then he puts his chin on the other side of the stock. its by far the weirdest thing I have ever seen, but he shoots good this way.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:00:56 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 4:23:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 6:32:48 PM EDT by f2]
Right handed and left eye dominant. No problem using my left eye using handguns. No problem using my right eye for AR BUIS (closing left). You need to decide and practice your decided upon method.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:26:43 PM EDT
I use an Aimpoint on an A2 to shoot from either shoulder with my dominant eye. This would work for you. Some magnifying optics will work this way also if the eye-relief range is right.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:53:39 PM EDT
Just have to learn to shoot with both hands, I have gotten good with a rifle right or left, but havent gotten the handgun down. I can shoot near as good lefty as right thgouh.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:52:16 PM EDT
I am the same way, grew up shooting off my right shoulder, wasn't until I joined the Army that I realized I am left eye dominant. The only time this has been a problem for me is in engaging multiple targets at different ranges because my left eye is used to scan the area for the next target and when I instictively aim the rifle and close my left eye the taget shifts to one side a bit. I've found that reflex sights (Aimpont, Trijicon, C-More) that work best when you shoot with both eyes open to provide the best solution. The downside to these is that they can be less accurate than irons at extended ranges. You can either break old habits and learn to shoot off your left shoulder or adapt to what your already comfortable with. I shot just as well if not better than most of the guys I know.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 8:14:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Beefypeanut:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By Tweak:
Aimpoint



What is Aimpoint? FWIW I have this too and I am learning to shoot with both eyes open. For some reason I can not close [wink] my right eye and I'm left eye dominate.

Patty



An Aimpoint is a red dot sight you use with both eyes open. I have an M2 and it works great.



interesting. I find that I do better with open sights then a scope but maybe with the red dot I can do better. I am starting to shoot exclusively left handed and doing pretty well with it. I'm stronger with my left arm which helps with my rifle as its pretty heavy.

Patty
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 9:18:37 PM EDT
It depends on what kind of shooting you are talking about. For plinking or range work it doesn't matter if you close your left eye or not, although you will fatigue more quickly from squinting. If you are talking about combat or training for that, you need to keep both eyes open. With both eyes open, a red dot sight is remarkably easier for anyone with cross eye dominance. You can focus on the target rather than the sight. Although there are no studies to prove it, I would guess that cross dominant shooters might even be more effective at close quarter shooting with red dot sights than same eye/hand shooters, because their brain will ignore the red dot in front of them better and place it on the target.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 9:26:16 PM EDT

I'm right handed/left eye dominant and shoot a rifle lefty. I have since I got my first bb gun as a child. I shoot a pistol right handed which makes rifle/pistol transistion pretty easy. I do have to close or squint my right eye a bit though (unless I'm using my aimpoint).

AR type rifles are WAY EASY to use left handed completely stock with a bit of practice.

Basically I would find out what feels the most natural and train that way.

Cheers,
Chris
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:33:14 AM EDT
I was left handed but in Kindergarten made to be right handed. I'm actually rather amidexerous [sp?] and can eat either hand, write with either hand but for throwing a ball, shooting a basket, holding a rifle it always felt most comfortable with my right hand - even though my left arm is much stronger. [In basketball I could do layins/lay ups and hook shots equally with either hand]. Lately because my rifle is so darn heavy I started learning to shoot with my left and I've found I'm more accurate with my left but it is not as comfortable feeling in my left yet. I suppose that would take practice. How much do these red dot scopes run? Buck season opens in a few weeks.

Patty
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:28:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By No4MK1:
I'm right handed/left eye dominant and shoot a rifle lefty. I have since I got my first bb gun as a child. I shoot a pistol right handed which makes rifle/pistol transistion pretty easy. I do have to close or squint my right eye a bit though (unless I'm using my aimpoint).

AR type rifles are WAY EASY to use left handed completely stock with a bit of practice.

Basically I would find out what feels the most natural and train that way.

Cheers,
Chris



+1. I'm the same, and never had a problem doing pistol right, rifle left. Go comfy, gear won't 'fix' it.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 10:40:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ExParatrooper:
Watch the movie "Firebirds" sometime if you haven't seen it. They have an interesting (if hollywood) approach to fixing this.



+1...it is possible for "some" people to retrain their dominant vision eye...others, it just doesn't work...
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 3:41:03 AM EDT
I have the same issue (Left eye, right handed). As others have stated, handguns are no problem because I just adjust my head. I've found this issue a much bigger problem when it comes to shooting shotguns then it is when shooting rifles. Either way, I probably should learn to shoot rifles and shotguns left handed but the few times I've tried I had a really hard time with it. In the end I decided it would be easier to learn how to compensate for my vision issues rather than trying to re-learn how to shoot from scratch.

Other then the wide field of view keeping both eyes open gives you, closing your left eye also causes a lot more strain on your weak eye making it harder to focus and concentrate. I use a Eotech on my M4gery. Because of it's design and mounting location, I found I have no problems shooting it with both eyes open and recommend it for people with eyesight issues like ours.

Good luck
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:47:46 PM EDT
I just always shot rifles leftie since it felt natural. However i shoot pistols and do everything else righthanded. Being left eye dominant, I never even tried a rifle righthanded until I wanted to prove to myself that I could do it.

While my marksmanship is very good from the right side it just doesn't feel as comfortable.
However, firing from either shoulder is probably easier for me than a more conventional right eye/righthanded or left eye/lefthanded shooter.

Try it different ways and find what works for you.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:01:20 PM EDT
I too and left eye dominant and right handed.

I learned to shot rifles left handed, then when I realized that being a capable shooter meant having the ability to easily adapt, I started shooting right handed as well. I actually learned to shoot handguns right handed.

Since then, I've worked on shooting with both hands with rifles, shotguns, and pistols. I'm not as good with rifles right eye'd, but do well all the other ways. I feel comfortable on the deer stand switching rifle hands to make shots, and have done so on several occasions.

For those that say it is unnatural feeling to shoulder a rifle with the other hand, just practice and it will quickly get that way. It gives you more flexability as a shooter.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:38:40 PM EDT
UVvis, that's good advice. Ever try doing simple things like pour a glass of tea with your off hand? Scoop ice cream with your off hand? Simple daily tasks don't go as smoothly as planned when you do.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 9:43:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 9:54:33 PM EDT by moosemcnally]
Howdy,

I am firearms instructor that teaches a lot of newbies to shoot both longguns and handguns.

We run into this issue a lot . As a matter of fact I am the same way. I shoot pistol right handed and I am left eye dominant.

If you are training/shooting for self defense reasons I would highly recomend you train and learn to shoot long guns left handed (dominant eye). During high stress and at closer distances many people will leave both eyes open even though they train with one eye closed. I've seen it repeatedly during simunition training on video.

Ask around and you'll find lots of folks who are cross dominant. If you talk to the duck hunters or big game hunter among them you'll here stories of them "looking down the side of the gun" instead of over it while shooting at game. I believe this is an example of eye dominance taking over because of the excitement (stress) of shooting at game. I think most folks who have been in life threatening situations would tell you it is more stressfull than "buck fever".

For that reason all new recruits that I train shoot longguns off the same shouler as their dominant eye. Most find the transition easier than they thought. I don't ask them to change hands with handguns.

Regarding the use of an Aimpoint, I like'em and they help. Try this trick next time you are at the range. Leave the front lens cover on your aimpoint down. Bring the rifle up on target and have both eyes open. Your eyes will superimpose the dot from your dominant eye onto the target image of the support eye and you will not lose any peripheral vision!!! Very slick way of shooting CQB.

I've talked with eye doctors about this very subject and all of them have told me it is near impossible to truly change eye dominance. All agree that you can purposely use the non dom eye well with training but that during stress it could go haywire.


MY TWO CENTS!
BE SAFE!
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 11:27:38 AM EDT
Very well said Moose.
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 8:53:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By moosemcnally:
If you are training/shooting for self defense reasons I would highly recomend you train and learn to shoot long guns left handed (dominant eye). During high stress and at closer distances many people will leave both eyes open even though they train with one eye closed. I've seen it repeatedly during simunition training on video.



Thanks Moose! Great information! But I've tried to shoot left handed and it just isn't happening. So if I stay with right handed shooting, what is the best optic solution to compensate for my situation?
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 10:06:49 AM EDT
I grew up shooting and hunting right handed. I lost the vision in my right eye at 15 due to a BB gun injury. (You'll shoot your eye out kid...)
When I got out of the hospital the first thing I did with my downtime was to spend as much time as I could shooting a BB rifle left handed. It was awkward at first, but it really didn't take long to adapt. I shoot as good or better now as a lefty than before as a righty.
I still shoot pistol right handed, but sight with the left eye.

The controls on an normal AR are no problem to use as a lefty. No need for left handed ejection or safety. I've never been struck in the face with brass after countless thousands of rounds through AR's.

After 25+ years shooting this way it feels funny to pick up a rifle in my right hand.

Adapt, Overcome
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 10:41:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By moosemcnally:
...I've talked with eye doctors about this very subject and all of them have told me it is near impossible to truly change eye dominance. All agree that you can purposely use the non dom eye well with training but that during stress it could go haywire.



I've heard the same from my doc.



Hello, my name is FMD, and I'm cross-eye dominant.

Pistols are less of an issue than irons on a rifle for me. As a result, I use a red-dot and keep both eyes open, and don't worry which eye is focused. The bullet still goes wherever the dot is superimposed when I pull the trigger.
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 7:07:52 PM EDT
I too am blessed with this problem. I am right handed, left eye dominant, and even corrected my right eye is much worse than my left eye. Very recently I have been very frustrated with this as it seems I can/will never be as good a shooter as I would've liked. Picking up my AR or Benelli against my left shoulder just seems awkward as hell. My right arm feels about half as strong as my left. Even trying to cheek weld on the left cheek seems silly. But I can see real friggin' good this way. I wouldn't even know where on my left shoulder to brace for a 3"mag slug coming out my Benelli.
Another frusrating thing is that I can't get to the range as often as I'd like (maybe once/month if that), so practicing is that much more difficult.
Being 30 years old, shooting maybe 5-6 times a year for 10 of those years, is it too late to try and shoot left handed? There's absoultely NO way I could pick up one of my handguns with my left hand - I'd end up shooting a big hole in my foot or knee, hehe. I think I can continue to shoot left eyed and right handed with the handguns and be fine. But with my rifles, I have GOT to friggin' figure something out!!!
As previous posts have suggested, I'll try to shoot lefty on rifle and continue righty on handguns. Practice, practice, practice.

**Moosemcnally** have you found in your instructing that those with this problem are less likely to become great shooters?
Link Posted: 9/27/2005 7:34:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/27/2005 7:58:16 AM EDT by moosemcnally]

Originally Posted By webbb01:

Originally Posted By moosemcnally:
If you are training/shooting for self defense reasons I would highly recomend you train and learn to shoot long guns left handed (dominant eye). During high stress and at closer distances many people will leave both eyes open even though they train with one eye closed. I've seen it repeatedly during simunition training on video.



Thanks Moose! Great information! But I've tried to shoot left handed and it just isn't happening. So if I stay with right handed shooting, what is the best optic solution to compensate for my situation?



I'd go with the Aimpoint and try the front cover trick and see how it treats you. The difficult part is to induce enough stress on yourself to have some idea what you will be looking at in a life threatening situation.

Competition can add stress, Simunitions is very good. pursuit of game etc... all can make you discover stuff you didn't know was going on because most of us do all our shooting "at the range".

Of course within a short time even these pursuits will not stress you out much. The first duck of the season teaches you more than 30th.
Link Posted: 9/27/2005 7:42:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/27/2005 8:00:19 AM EDT by moosemcnally]

Originally Posted By Brahmzy:
I too am blessed with this problem. I am right handed, left eye dominant, and even corrected my right eye is much worse than my left eye. Very recently I have been very frustrated with this as it seems I can/will never be as good a shooter as I would've liked. Picking up my AR or Benelli against my left shoulder just seems awkward as hell. My right arm feels about half as strong as my left. Even trying to cheek weld on the left cheek seems silly. But I can see real friggin' good this way. I wouldn't even know where on my left shoulder to brace for a 3"mag slug coming out my Benelli.
Another frusrating thing is that I can't get to the range as often as I'd like (maybe once/month if that), so practicing is that much more difficult.
Being 30 years old, shooting maybe 5-6 times a year for 10 of those years, is it too late to try and shoot left handed? There's absoultely NO way I could pick up one of my handguns with my left hand - I'd end up shooting a big hole in my foot or knee, hehe. I think I can continue to shoot left eyed and right handed with the handguns and be fine. But with my rifles, I have GOT to friggin' figure something out!!!
As previous posts have suggested, I'll try to shoot lefty on rifle and continue righty on handguns. Practice, practice, practice.

**Moosemcnally** have you found in your instructing that those with this problem are less likely to become great shooters?



Sorry I had ingnored this for a while. I have 70 percent of my staff on some detail or another (Rita Katrina) and I am doing the FTO thing right now so I am pretty busy.

I don't think cross dominanance for handgun users will effect your true potential I let folks shoot right handed with a dominant left eye with pistols quite often and I don't believe it matters much at all. When it comes to rifle and shotgun I force the issue and make them change to what ever eye is in charge. Your dominant eye, with some medical exceptions(injury), will always be wanting to interfere during stress.

A couple of years ago I had an officer who could not qualify due to a hand injury (carpal tunnel syndrome). I made a deal with her that if she would practice and transition to her "weak hand" I would train along side her with pistol, rifle, and shotgun and do the same. I fiuured it would help her keep a career and help me as an instructor to be able to manipulate the weapons and demonstrate from both sides of the weapon. We both still have a job and I am a better instructor for it.

It really doesn't take long to learn to shoot off the other shoulder and your better off not doing it at the range at first. I do admit it does feel funny for a while. Unload the rifle a few nights a week, and bring the rifle up (on your "off" shoulder) to your TV screen everytime yo see the letter A in a word or whatever. Soon you will feel very comfortable. Every day for a week, every week for a month and every month for a year and you own it!!!!!!!!!
"DON'T SHOOT YOUR TV AND SEND ME THE BILL!"
Link Posted: 9/27/2005 9:22:21 AM EDT
To muddy the waters a little. I am left handed right eye dominant however I have convergence issues with my right eye meaning that my eye can not focus when objects are near the right eye. The fix for me was to move the rear sight forward. I have always shot right handed as my father didn't want to pay extra for a left handed gun he wouldn't be able to shoot. I was amidextreous but in kindergarten they made me choose because righting with both hands equally well was "wrong".
Link Posted: 9/27/2005 4:29:01 PM EDT
As a kid I shot right handed and right eye dominate. Somewhere along the line my eye switched. Retrained my right eye for pistol and rifle yet when useing a shotgun I shoot better left handed with left eye.
Link Posted: 9/27/2005 4:33:21 PM EDT
damn sux to be you.
Link Posted: 9/27/2005 10:32:57 PM EDT
I'm left eye dominant/right handed. It doesn't matter. When shooting with the handgun you'll naturally look through your left eye, but if you want to you can close that and look through your right and you'll still do fine. When shooting a rifle with iron sights or scope, look with your right eye. If your head is planted correctly on the stock you can't look down the sights with your left eye anyway.

Being left eye dominant doesn't mean you can't see correctly with your right eye or that your aim will be off if you close your left eye and use only your right. It means when both eyes are open then the left eye is dominating the binocular vision. You can prove this to yourself with a little thought and experimentation. Hold both eyes open and aim. Close the dominant eye. The aim is off. So what? Move your head as you continue to look through the non-dominant eye. The aim is now on. You move your head, not your point of aim. The barrel doesn't "care" which eye you look through. It only "cares" whether it's pointed at the target or not, and once it's pointed at the target it doesn't mean a thing what your eyes are doing.

There is only one reason to go though all the dehabituation involved in a right handed person trying to shoot a rifle left handed just because of being left eye dominat: the insistence upon keeping both eyes open because you believe you're breaking some indisputable tactical code handed down from some gun guru somewhere. These are the same people who are always saying that you revert to your training. So train youself to look through your right eye when shooting a rifle. It's a hell of a lot easier and a lot more natural physiologically.

I'll add, that my girlfriend is like me: left eye dominant/right handed. Her first attempts with a rifle were to look down the barrel with her left eye, positioning her head to do that. Once I explained to her to use her right eye she did fine. It's really not that difficult and I don't understand what all the fuss is always about on this topic.

GL
Link Posted: 9/28/2005 4:53:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GunLogic:
There is only one reason to go though all the dehabituation involved in a right handed person trying to shoot a rifle left handed just because of being left eye dominat: the insistence upon keeping both eyes open because you believe you're breaking some indisputable tactical code handed down from some gun guru somewhere. These are the same people who are always saying that you revert to your training. So train youself to look through your right eye when shooting a rifle. It's a hell of a lot easier and a lot more natural physiologically.



That is not entirely true. As mentioned, shooting a pistol with both eyes open, even if you are cross eye dominate is no big deal but if you are cross eye dominate and try to sight down a shotgun (or rifle with open sights), you will be looking at the side of the barrel instead of sighting down the top of it. Because of that, you are forced to close your dominant eye. The problem is, there are a number of reasons\situations were you want\need to shoot a rifle or shotgun with both eyes open.

The main issue has to do with peripheral vision. When you close one eye you are seriously limiting your peripheral vision. Not a big deal if you are shooting single, stationary targets but when you start dealing with multiple and or moving targets it is a big disadvantage. The loss of peripheral vision will make it much harder to track a moving object as well as affect the amount of time it will take to pick up and track the secondary target.

There is a trick that a lot of the clay shooters with the cross-eye dominance use, they put scotch tape over the left lens of their shooting glasses. The idea being that the right eye will be forced into dominance because the left eye’s field of view is too blurry. Because the left eye is still open with limited vision, you will still retain a larger percentage of your peripheral vision allowing you to pick up the targets quicker. This trick doesn’t work very well for me but many people swear by it.

There is another issue with closing your dominant eye and forcing your non-dominant eye to do all the work, eye strain. Your non-dominant eye in essence is your weaker eye. If forced to do all the work, it will tire much quicker than normal (i.e. as opposed to using both eyes). The more tired or strained your weak eye becomes, the harder it will be for you to focus and see clearly. Unfortunately, unlike other muscles in the body, doing this repeatedly will not strengthen your weak eye (at least not a very noticeable amount).

This does not mean that closing your dominant eye is not an option. With training and practice and it is very workable. That said, regardless of how much training you do, you will always be at a disadvantage when shooting multiple and\or moving targets if you close one eye.

As far as the training issue goes, that will depend on the individual. In my case, I am so accustomed to closing my left eye that I do naturally. I have found myself closing my left eye instinctively even when I am purposely trying to keep it open. As usually, each individual will have to decide their best game plan based off of their needs and abilities. There is no one, right answer.
Link Posted: 9/28/2005 8:13:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By moosemcnally:
Howdy,

I am firearms instructor that teaches a lot of newbies to shoot both longguns and handguns.

We run into this issue a lot . As a matter of fact I am the same way. I shoot pistol right handed and I am left eye dominant.

If you are training/shooting for self defense reasons I would highly recomend you train and learn to shoot long guns left handed (dominant eye). During high stress and at closer distances many people will leave both eyes open even though they train with one eye closed. I've seen it repeatedly during simunition training on video.

Ask around and you'll find lots of folks who are cross dominant. If you talk to the duck hunters or big game hunter among them you'll here stories of them "looking down the side of the gun" instead of over it while shooting at game. I believe this is an example of eye dominance taking over because of the excitement (stress) of shooting at game. I think most folks who have been in life threatening situations would tell you it is more stressfull than "buck fever".

For that reason all new recruits that I train shoot longguns off the same shouler as their dominant eye. Most find the transition easier than they thought. I don't ask them to change hands with handguns.

Regarding the use of an Aimpoint, I like'em and they help. Try this trick next time you are at the range. Leave the front lens cover on your aimpoint down. Bring the rifle up on target and have both eyes open. Your eyes will superimpose the dot from your dominant eye onto the target image of the support eye and you will not lose any peripheral vision!!! Very slick way of shooting CQB.

I've talked with eye doctors about this very subject and all of them have told me it is near impossible to truly change eye dominance. All agree that you can purposely use the non dom eye well with training but that during stress it could go haywire.


MY TWO CENTS!
BE SAFE!



I am left eye dominant and shoot right handed. When on long guns that will be for close quarters, I use the BAC (accupoint, in my case), thus with both eyes open and the non-dominate (rigth) eye picking up the dot/reticule. (if on irons or non-BAC optics`, I squint the dominant slightly and my right eye picks up the sights while I still have peripheral in my left eye, but that's not part of my question.) Personally, I have found this off gun dominate eye an advantage (with BAC) because I have a clearer and more natural field of view when searching and acquiring.
Nonetheless, have you found in your instruction or experience that right shooters with left dominate eyes using BAC will lose the reticule when under severe stress (ie the dominate left eye extinguishing the non-dominate eye's imposition of the reticule)?
Link Posted: 9/28/2005 8:42:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Serbspaniard:
I am left eye dominant and shoot right handed. When on long guns that will be for close quarters, I use the BAC (accupoint, in my case), thus with both eyes open and the non-dominate (rigth) eye picking up the dot/reticule. (if on irons or non-BAC optics`, I squint the dominant slightly and my right eye picks up the sights while I still have peripheral in my left eye, but that's not part of my question.) Personally, I have found this off gun dominate eye an advantage (with BAC) because I have a clearer and more natural field of view when searching and acquiring.
Nonetheless, have you found in your instruction or experience that right shooters with left dominate eyes using BAC will lose the reticule when under severe stress (ie the dominate left eye extinguishing the non-dominate eye's imposition of the reticule)?



I'm surprised to hear BAC works for you. I've not had the opportunity to try a Trijicon BAC scope in person but reading the description, I kind of assumed it would not work for a cross-eye dominant shooter for the same reason you listed (highlighted part above). I didn't even think it would require a high stress situation to cause the problem? How long have you been using it? Have you ever tried it on a moving targets?

Myself, I use an Eotech for my CQB rifle because it's design let's it be mounted further out and does not have an parallax issues so basically I can use my dominant left eye while still shooting right handed. As long as I see the dot on target, then I am on target. It works very well for me.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:48:40 PM EDT
I'm right handed and left eye dominant.
It never was an issue to me, when I was 5 my dad taught me to shoot left handed.
I can shoot right handed but not as well.
You can learn to shoot left handed and I think it is your best option.
You wont always want or be able to buy optics for every weapon you will ever shoot.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:52:59 PM EDT
http://www.arizonagunrunners.com/Products/Trijicon/armsonoeg/body_armsonoeg.html

Try one of these
You cant see through it and you have to have both eyes open the dot will appear in your left
Takes a little getting used to but works great and doesnt need batteries
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:06:26 PM EDT
My friend had a doc tell him he had a calcium deposit on his back for over 2 years, and it wound up being a cyst. "But my doc told me..." Well my gun store owner told me...

I became right eye dominant from training it. It takes a long time, for me about 2 years, but I'm now right eye dominant, and I used to be left. I'm not saying this is the best way to go about it, but it worked for me. All i'm saying is it's possible.

By the way, I , bat, throw,and play golf left handed. I shoot, play pool, and play instruments right handed.

I can write with both hands, but prefer left, I can shoot left, but hate it.

Maybe I'm a freak, who knows...
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 9:34:39 PM EDT
So dumb question, but just how do you tell which eye is dominant?

I've been shooting since I was like 5 and have no clue which of my eyes is the dominant one .
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 9:51:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 9:57:18 PM EDT by FishKepr]

Originally Posted By MurdockTheCrazy:
So dumb question, but just how do you tell which eye is dominant?

I've been shooting since I was like 5 and have no clue which of my eyes is the dominant one .



Pick a distant object and look at it with both eyes open. Extend your hand and form a circle around the object with your thumb and fingers. Slowly move your hand toward your face keeping the object in the circle with both eyes open. The eye your fingers circle around is your dominate eye.

ETA:
I used to be strongly cross dominate, but a few years of practice with blinders reduced the amount of dominance to a managable level. ACOGs and the CQ/T (i.e. most optics with even slight magnification) work very well for me.
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