Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
User Panel

Site Notices
Posted: 4/15/2017 12:00:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/15/2017 5:05:36 PM EDT
[#1]
It's a good idea, I recommended this set here a couple of years ago. > Link. Link.

Here is another set from Little Crow Gunworks. > Link.

This one from Crosstac is great too. > Link.

While I'm at it, these make life easier by holding everything together while installing the bolt catch roll pin. > Link.

Also, lets not forget that this punch here is made only for the removal of the bolt catch roll pin. > Link.

+1 on the coiled/spiral pins too, I use the ones from RRA.
Link Posted: 4/15/2017 9:53:40 PM EDT
[#2]
I just use the Brownells one and drive from the front.  For some strange reason people think it needs to be driven in from the rear.  Of course there is no reason.  That one looks nice and you can't beat the price. 
Link Posted: 4/15/2017 10:50:24 PM EDT
[#3]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I just use the Brownells one and drive from the front.  For some strange reason people think it needs to be driven in from the rear.  Of course there is no reason.  That one looks nice and you can't beat the price. 
View Quote
This may sound crazy but there is a reason.

The reason that you drive the roll pin in from the rear is because you can't and you're not supposed to drive it out through the front. This really kind of applies to all roll pins though and not just the bolt catch roll pin.

Roll pins should be removed through the direction that they were installed from. One of the unwritten rules of gun assembling is that the pins go in from the right and get removed from the left. The reason for this is that upon installation the batter end of the roll pin becomes slightly mushroomed and if you remove the roll pin by continuing to pound it in the same direction that you installed it from you run the risk of enlarging the roll pin hole the whole way through. By pounding the roll pin out the way it came in from you avoid that risk as much as possible. Mushrooming the end of a roll pin is also the reason that you are not supposed to reuse roll pins.
Link Posted: 4/15/2017 11:08:50 PM EDT
[#4]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


This may sound crazy but there is a reason.

The reason that you drive the roll pin in from the rear is because you can't and you're not supposed to drive it out through the front. This really kind of applies to all roll pins though and not just the bolt catch roll pin.

Roll pins should be removed through the direction that they were installed from. One of the unwritten rules of gun assembling is that the pins go in from the right and get removed from the left. The reason for this is that upon installation the batter end of the roll pin becomes slightly mushroomed and if you remove the roll pin by continuing to pound it in the same direction that you installed it from you run the risk of enlarging the roll pin hole the whole way through. By pounding the roll pin out the way it came in from you avoid that risk as much as possible. Mushrooming the end of a roll pin is also the reason that you are not supposed to reuse roll pins.
View Quote
I understand about not driving flared heads through the holes.  But this is not applicable to the bolt catch.  When installed the roll pin is fully recessed in the receiver.  There is no flared or wider part of the pin.  The is not true with roll pins that are flush with the surface but that is not the case with the bolt catch.  Any damage you were going to do, you have already done by driving it u til it was recessed.
Link Posted: 4/15/2017 11:17:14 PM EDT
[#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I understand about not driving flared heads through the holes.  But this is not applicable to the bolt catch.  When installed the roll pin is fully recessed in the receiver.  There is no flared or wider part of the pin.  The is not true with roll pins that are flush with the surface but that is not the case with the bolt catch.  Any damage you were going to do, you have already done by driving it u til it was recessed.
View Quote
A roll pin is a roll pin is a roll pin, their ends can become flared no matter what they are tasked with holding in place.

Insetting the roll pin only risks enlarging a very small portion at the opening of the roll pin hole.
Link Posted: 4/15/2017 11:33:28 PM EDT
[#6]
Don't get me wrong.  I think that is great general advice and I agree with it especially for things like the pins in the poly frames of m and P's.  But my experience is that whatever flare the pin had disappears once you drive it until it is fully recessed, at that point there is no flare.  There can not be when the pin is fully contained within the hole.

Heck in all the years I have been here the only roll pin damage I really remember seeing is related to the trigger guard.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 12:07:14 AM EDT
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Don't get me wrong.  I think that is great general advice and I agree with it especially for things like the pins in the poly frames of m and P's.  But my experience is that whatever flare the pin had disappears once you drive it until it is fully recessed, at that point there is no flare.  There can not be when the pin is fully contained within the hole.

Heck in all the years I have been here the only roll pin damage I really remember seeing is related to the trigger guard.
View Quote
I could maybe agree with that assessment if we were talking about driving a roll pin into a hardened steel hole but with an aluminum hole I think we would more likely be seeing the aluminum hole conforming to the flare on the roll pin.

I do seem to recall seeing (here on the forums) some bolt catch roll pins being so mushroomed that they could not be driven flush. Though that was beyond the slight amount of flare or mushrooming that we are talking about here.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 12:40:49 AM EDT
[#8]
If admit I have probably installed 40-50 of them but there isn't very many I have taken out.  But a quick look at a half dozen in the safe says the anodizing isn't even disturbed on the inside of the holes.  In any case more solutions and options for tools are always better.  I ordered the croastac from your post.  I like the idea of a combined pivot pin tool.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:49:57 AM EDT
[#9]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
If admit I have probably installed 40-50 of them but there isn't very many I have taken out.  But a quick look at a half dozen in the safe says the anodizing isn't even disturbed on the inside of the holes.  In any case more solutions and options for tools are always better.  I ordered the croastac from your post.  I like the idea of a combined pivot pin tool.
View Quote
Well, you have installed more bolt catch roll pins than me so I will bow to your experience in this case. My argument is based on theory more so than anything that I have seen personally.

I do own that Crosstac bolt catch roll pin holder punch and it works very well for both of it's uses. I also own the R-GUNS holder punch and setter punch and they work very well too.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 5:08:20 PM EDT
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I just use the Brownells one and drive from the front.  For some strange reason people think it needs to be driven in from the rear.  Of course there is no reason.  That one looks nice and you can't beat the priced. 
View Quote
If you are like me, you put the front of the mag well down onto the bench, and stabilize it while inserting the roll pin.  Hard to balance it on the buffer tube insert.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 5:27:14 PM EDT
[#11]
Am I the only one that just uses channel locks and electrical tape?
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:27:27 PM EDT
[#12]
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:37:37 PM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Am I the only one that just uses channel locks and electrical tape?
View Quote
I just use my drill press. Chuck up a punch and press the pin in like butter. All my roll pins get pressed in, so much easier than swinging a hammer while trying to keep the punch lined up.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:46:14 PM EDT
[#14]
Between the KAK and Brownells tool.... I don't dread installing a bolt catch anymore. I use the Brownells tool to hold the catch in place while I drive the pin with the KAK tool. Cake!
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 10:40:56 PM EDT
[#15]
I have install LPKs in 20-30 ARs. I never really found installing the roll pins to be an issue. Seems a lot of guys have trouble with them. Lots of specialty tools sold just for this. It is simple either use a press, pliers or lights taps from a hammer.

Maybe I am good at roll pins because of my 30 years of being an auto technician has developed my skills with stuff like this.

Buy some good quality roll pin punches and a small hammer and you will be fine or take pliers, channel locks or vise-grips and tape over the jaws and carefully press the pin in.
Link Posted: 4/17/2017 4:46:58 AM EDT
[#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I have install LPKs in 20-30 ARs. I never really found installing the roll pins to be an issue. Seems a lot of guys have trouble with them.
View Quote
Same here. The same thing can be said of the trigger guard roll pins, too.
Link Posted: 4/17/2017 8:26:37 AM EDT
[#17]
I got a whole set if AR specific roll pin starter punches off of Amazon for under 10 bucks.
They certainly make things easier.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 2:39:34 PM EDT
[#18]
Never understood why people have trouble installing the bolt catch pins. I use a starter punch and finish it off with a standard pin punch. Never had any trouble and never marred any lowers.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 4:32:36 PM EDT
[#19]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Never understood why people have trouble installing the bolt catch pins. I use a starter punch and finish it off with a standard pin punch. Never had any trouble and never marred any lowers.
View Quote
I bet your average guy doesn't have those tools. I didn't until after I built my first.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 6:24:27 PM EDT
[#20]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I bet your average guy doesn't have those tools. I didn't until after I built my first.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Never understood why people have trouble installing the bolt catch pins. I use a starter punch and finish it off with a standard pin punch. Never had any trouble and never marred any lowers.
I bet your average guy doesn't have those tools. I didn't until after I built my first.
You're probably right. Years ago when I first got into this game, neither did I. In fact, I built several personal rifles before acquiring the right tools and I still didn't have an issue installing any of the roll pins in the upper or lower. Not bragging, simply stating I don't understand why the roll pins on AR's are always made to be a bigger issue than necessary, even by seemingly experienced members. There are several ways to install a roll pin safely, even without the use of a punch.
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top