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Posted: 1/2/2004 12:59:57 PM EDT
Whats the best way to apply finish to upper and lower receivers? Does parkerizing come in different colors? I saw in the picture post pages a couple of rifles with camo.
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 2:08:15 PM EDT
AR receivers are aluminum and anodized not parkerized. They can be dyed any color you like after anodizing and before sealing. You can paint after anodizing, but I'd avoid painting bare aluminum since it won't have the protective AL oxide coating.
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 3:36:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NevadaARshooter: AR receivers are aluminum and anodized not parkerized. They can be dyed any color you like after anodizing and before sealing. You can paint after anodizing, but I'd avoid painting bare aluminum since it won't have the protective AL oxide coating.
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Is that so? i thought anodizing was parkerazing....or at least that's what i've read...i guess that author was wrong. HUNTER.
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 5:10:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2004 5:11:53 PM EDT by NevadaARshooter]
No, anodizing is for aluminum. Its done using a weak sulfuric acid solution and a power supply. After growing the aluminum oxide layer you cook the part in a dye bath followed by selaing the al-ox pores with either steam, boiling water, or a nickle salt solution. Parkerizing is done with a sort of phosphoric acid solution to carbon steels. Manganese phosphate is the dark charcol finish on AR15 barrel, M1A, etc. Zinc phosphate coatings are a light grey.
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 6:13:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NevadaARshooter: No, anodizing is for aluminum. Its done using a weak sulfuric acid solution and a power supply. After growing the aluminum oxide layer you cook the part in a dye bath followed by selaing the al-ox pores with either steam, boiling water, or a nickle salt solution. Parkerizing is done with a sort of phosphoric acid solution to carbon steels. Manganese phosphate is the dark charcol finish on AR15 barrel, M1A, etc. Zinc phosphate coatings are a light grey.
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Can you also anodize stainless steel?
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 7:14:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2004 7:16:31 PM EDT by NevadaARshooter]
No. Other than AL I've only heard of anodizing titanium. Carbon steels disolve when anodized. Sometimes people use that technique to remove steel taps or drills after breaking them off in an aluminum work piece. Just anodize the work for an hour or so... when you remove the part from the acid bath the bit or tap is gone. I don't think that works for SS though.
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 7:18:39 PM EDT
Can someone do this with any amount of ease at home, or is this better off left with the professionals.
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 7:49:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By colossians323: Can someone do this with any amount of ease at home, or is this better off left with the professionals.
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Leave the annodizing to the pros.. There are several at home finishes you can do that come out pretty darn good. If you want the milspec hard annodize there are companies like Tech Plate in CA. and PC in Titusville FL. that can do the job for a fair price (70-90.00 for a lower as an example)... John
Link Posted: 1/2/2004 8:21:02 PM EDT
Nonsense. I have anodized at least a dozen receivers at home. It requires one to work with acid and electricity... so it should not be tried by an idiot. However, responsible and knowledgable home hobbyists do it all the time.
Link Posted: 1/3/2004 5:11:34 AM EDT
GMTMaster: Can you give us the name and address of Tech Plate and PC for refinishing. Thanks
Link Posted: 1/3/2004 1:38:16 PM EDT
Maybe I am missing something here, but I've been using KG gunkote for over twenty years and found it to be the best home workshop finish you can apply. Works well on aluminum alloys, as well as carbon and stainless steels. The new moly finishes are also available in camo colors. What's not to like?
Link Posted: 1/3/2004 2:19:01 PM EDT
Aluminum is a soft metal. The aluminumn oxide layer formed by anodizing is extremely hard (harder than steel) and provides wear resistence and scratch in areas such as pin holes and the interior of the upper where the bolt carrier rides. Paint is... paint. This is the reason all the AR manufacturers anodize their receivers.
Link Posted: 1/3/2004 6:43:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NevadaARshooter: It requires one to work with acid and electricity... so it should not be tried by an idiot.
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Acid, and electricity ? I think I'll play the idiot, and send it off to the pros. Plus, my wife gets pissed off when I play with dyes around the house, let alone the before mentioned.
Link Posted: 1/3/2004 8:40:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By WSAR15: GMTMaster: Can you give us the name and address of Tech Plate and PC for refinishing. Thanks
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Here you go: PC 701 Columbia Blvd Bldg 401 Titusville, FL 32780 Phone: 321-267-1161 I don't have Techplate's any longer. Do a google search and you should find them...
Link Posted: 1/3/2004 8:43:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NevadaARshooter: Nonsense. I have anodized at least a dozen receivers at home. It requires one to work with acid and electricity... so it should not be tried by an idiot. However, responsible and knowledgable home hobbyists do it all the time.
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Ill put myself on the list for now. I might try it on some scrap, but to strip a receiver, and dye it at home? Not for me.. Im sure lots of guys do it though... John
Link Posted: 1/4/2004 5:03:11 AM EDT
NevadaARshooter Tell us how your reanodizing turns out. Does it look origional? I am interested.
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