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Posted: 3/16/2005 11:50:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/16/2005 11:50:17 AM EST by Kimber_45]
I have done the 15 minute trigger job on another gun and I liked it. I took the hammer spring which I had clipped one of the sides like the job says and put it in my target AR. It made the 2-stage trigger feel even better. Would it hurt clipping the same spring on the 2-stage trigger? Just shooting BH and WWB HP so no M193 or nothing like that so not worried about having hard primers to ignite. Thanks for the help! Adam
Link Posted: 3/16/2005 7:33:58 PM EST
Anyone?
Link Posted: 3/16/2005 7:51:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/16/2005 7:52:35 PM EST by WIZZO_ARAKM14]
I don't really know.

It should work, but I'm no expert.

I do know that I just basically ruined a RRA trigger with a Dremel this weekend

It still works, but it's just a single stage now, with no indication (in trigger pull) when the hammer will fall.

Whatever you do......DON'T TOUCH IT WITH A DREMEL!!!!!

Other than that, you should be fine.

WIZZO
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:24:58 PM EST
I have no experience with them, but from what i have read you are best to leave a RRA trigger as is. If its no big deal for you to order a new spring, give it a try and let us know how it goes. A spring is replacable, but dont grind on anything.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:33:42 PM EST
Just polish the bearing surfaces with a buffing wheel and some jeweler's rouge (slowly) till they're shiny and slick.....you'll get a VERY smooth, clean break on a RRA...without screwing it up.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 6:57:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By swingset:
Just polish the bearing surfaces with a buffing wheel and some jeweler's rouge (slowly) till they're shiny and slick.....you'll get a VERY smooth, clean break on a RRA...without screwing it up.



Me too.

I used a dremel and the polishing compound.

Link Posted: 3/17/2005 7:14:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/17/2005 7:42:08 PM EST by CJan_NH]
The springs in your RRA trigger are already lighter than the standard springs in your stock triggers Kimber. Clipping the lightweight RRA hammer spring could very well lead to reliability issues, since you would be removing the extra margin of power necessary to *reliably* ignite all but the softest primers. The RRA springs have been specifically matched to the trigger, and they don't need to get any lighter. For what it's worth I tried a set of very light JP springs in one of my RRA two-stage triggers for experimentation purposes, and reliability went right into the toilet.

As was stated above the best way to clean up your RRA two-stage is to *GENTLY* polish the engagement surfaces. Don't get medieval on it-less is more in this case-particularly if you get carried away and start to actually remove material.

Another quick and painless thing to do is to carefully secure your hammer and trigger pins in a drill chuck and then spin them lightly against a brillo pad to gently smooth them out and knock down any burrs. You don't want to spin them so hard that you strip away the anodizing. After doing one side of the pin flip it around to do the other side-then repeat with the second pin. You will be amazed at how smooth the surfaces will feel after you're done. This will translate into less hammer/trigger rotational friction, which will lend itself to smoother operation.

With a little bit of effort you can make your RRA two-stage glass rod crisp, without having to resort to cutting
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 7:31:38 PM EST
thanks for the responses! I did some polishing to the engagement surfaces. I will do a little more polishing.(not removing metal) Adam
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