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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/15/2006 3:12:19 PM EDT
What is the proper way of using bore brushes?

From breech/chamber to muzzle?
Or back and forth?

It seems to take forever to get anything cleaned by going only one way.
I heard going back and forth wears out the brush, but the brushes are like $1-$2 each.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:39:47 PM EDT
Not sure if this is "correct" but how I do it after gleening various tips over the years.

At first, I was told brushes work the most effective when dry. Later I found that this can cause hard particles to collect on the brush and become abrasive in the bore. I now use them wet with solvent.

However, I run the brushes back and forth. I know some have claimed it's best to unscrew them when they exit the muzzle and pull the rod back through. Personally, I feel that by the time I get done unscrewing the brush, I will have rubbed the rod against the crown quite a bit. So I concluded it would be best just to scrub back and forth a few times. (patches, however, I pull off when they exit the bore and I pull the rod and jag back through)

Just my $.02, I'm interested to see what the "correct" way is too.

Gundraw

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 6:52:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GunDraw:
Not sure if this is "correct" but how I do it after gleening various tips over the years.

At first, I was told brushes work the most effective when dry. Later I found that this can cause hard particles to collect on the brush and become abrasive in the bore. I now use them wet with solvent.

However, I run the brushes back and forth. I know some have claimed it's best to unscrew them when they exit the muzzle and pull the rod back through. Personally, I feel that by the time I get done unscrewing the brush, I will have rubbed the rod against the crown quite a bit. So I concluded it would be best just to scrub back and forth a few times. (patches, however, I pull off when they exit the bore and I pull the rod and jag back through)

Just my $.02, I'm interested to see what the "correct" way is too.

+1 Good info

Gundraw


Link Posted: 1/15/2006 7:09:37 PM EDT
Personally, i dont think you're going to do any dammage by running the brush back through. The problem lies when you move the brush back and forth in a scrubbing motion.

Usually what i do to clean my barrel is:
1. flush chamber/barrel with brake cleaner to remove lose stuff
2. run brush all the way down the barrel and out, then back through in one smooth motion
3. flush again between each brushings
4. after flushing doesnt produce much comming out, i run patches soaked in brake cleaner until i get a clean one
5. run barrel mop soaked in CLP through
6. run patch lightly oiled with CLP for final wipe and lube

Chrome lined barrels are pretty easy to care for, and tough to fuck up.

"go chrome or go home"
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 3:00:36 AM EDT
some CMP shooters do not let the patch or bursh exit the crown. They clain that the brush and patch expanding as it is exiting the muzzel causes extra wear on the muzzel area.

Me I run the brush both ways using a guide. Brush wet and bore verry wet w/ fav solvent.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 3:08:25 AM EDT
Ever try a DRY HumP??? Sucks right??? Ain't any better for your rifle.

Lube first - brake cleaner, on a loose patch, is good for the carbon build up. I repeat this till pretty much I see "clean" patches then go with the rest of the "normal" cleaning procedures.

Always breach first - SAVE that CROWN, last thing that MOST affects your bullets path.



Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:45:50 AM EDT
How do you guys brush your teeth?

I doubt you push the brush only 1 way. My dentist tells me to brush in a circular pattern.

So why don't we use a bore brush one size smaller and go back and forth through the bore to scrub out the gunk? I can visually see deposits sticking to the lands in my 30 cal barrel.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:36:02 AM EDT
I use an Otis rod, so I can only go one way way, from chamber to muzzle. I always clean either with CLP or M Pro 7.

I don't worry about the brush or patch exiting the crown, but when used a steel rod I tried to be careful about banging it into the crown.

For effective cleaning,pay attention to your brushes. They do wear out faster than most people realize. BSW
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:57:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By metroplex:
How do you guys brush your teeth?

I doubt you push the brush only 1 way. My dentist tells me to brush in a circular pattern.

So why don't we use a bore brush one size smaller and go back and forth through the bore to scrub out the gunk? I can visually see deposits sticking to the lands in my 30 cal barrel.



Will not work as well a a fitting brush. Rember with using a good like such as a dewy the brush rotates as it goes down the bore.

a loose fitting brush you will be unable to apply enough side force without hitting the bore with your rod.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:07:49 AM EDT
Rifle barrels are not your teeth.

One way eliminates the re-introduction of the BAD stuff, unless you are using sprecific bore pastes which may need the stoking to properly work. Nonetheless, with many of the chemicallly oriented solutions you don't need a brush, just fresh "solution soaked" patches pushed through once.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 12:55:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lion_Dog:
Rifle barrels are not your teeth.

One way eliminates the re-introduction of the BAD stuff, unless you are using sprecific bore pastes which may need the stoking to properly work. Nonetheless, with many of the chemicallly oriented solutions you don't need a brush, just fresh "solution soaked" patches pushed through once.



I really think there is some truth to this I think that the chemical solvents should really do the "grunt work" of getting the fouling loosened up. I don't think barrels should need to be "scrubbed" with the brush. Instead, it should be used to remove the loosened material that wouldn't swab out with a patch. With that in mind, I only use a brush once in a while, kinda like decoppering your barrel, I don't do it every time, just when I feel it's been used enough to warrant the procedure.

Gundraw
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:17:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 5:24:03 PM EDT by Lion_Dog]

Originally Posted By GunDraw:

Originally Posted By Lion_Dog:
Rifle barrels are not your teeth.

One way eliminates the re-introduction of the BAD stuff, unless you are using sprecific bore pastes which may need the stoking to properly work. Nonetheless, with many of the chemicallly oriented solutions you don't need a brush, just fresh "solution soaked" patches pushed through once.



I really think there is some truth to this I think that the chemical solvents should really do the "grunt work" of getting the fouling loosened up. I don't think barrels should need to be "scrubbed" with the brush. Instead, it should be used to remove the loosened material that wouldn't swab out with a patch. With that in mind, I only use a brush once in a while, kinda like decoppering your barrel, I don't do it every time, just when I feel it's been used enough to warrant the procedure.

Gundraw



IIRC ammonia based products break down brass bronze as well as the copper. So IF you use a bronze brush with ammonia based product WHEN you use a patch to remove all the debris it comes out green. Well hell, even if the bore WAS clean the patch would continue to come out green. Use a WET NYLON brush of the appropriate size when using ammonia based products. The Nylon can be very abrasive so make sure it the bore and the brush are wet.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:14:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 6:15:10 PM EDT by GunDraw]

Originally Posted By Lion_Dog:

Originally Posted By GunDraw:

I really think there is some truth to this I think that the chemical solvents should really do the "grunt work" of getting the fouling loosened up. I don't think barrels should need to be "scrubbed" with the brush. Instead, it should be used to remove the loosened material that wouldn't swab out with a patch. With that in mind, I only use a brush once in a while, kinda like decoppering your barrel, I don't do it every time, just when I feel it's been used enough to warrant the procedure.

Gundraw



IIRC ammonia based products break down brass bronze as well as the copper. So IF you use a bronze brush with ammonia based product WHEN you use a patch to remove all the debris it comes out green. Well hell, even if the bore WAS clean the patch would continue to come out green. Use a WET NYLON brush of the appropriate size when using ammonia based products. The Nylon can be very abrasive so make sure it the bore and the brush are wet.



I was stating that I use a brush with intermittant regularity LIKE decoppering, not DURING decoppering necessarily. Although if I do, I usually use Sweets as instructed, then rubbing alcohol to neutralize the ammonia, then hoppe's if needed, and if it is necessary, a brush, then repeat.

You are correct, copper solvent will eat at the brush.

Gundraw
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