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Posted: 5/11/2004 4:07:52 PM EST
Does anyone have pics of the S/R technique? I can't quite get a hold of the light with the pistol and keep it parallel to the barrel. I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong.
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 5:59:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/11/2004 6:00:08 PM EST by SMGLee]
Taken from Surefire, writen by Ken Good

Rogers/SureFire Technique
Description
Small SureFire light is held between forefinger and middle finger in a “syringe” grip, that is, with these
fingers gripping the body of the flashlight (and in front of the integral rubber ring, if the flashlight has
one). Lens of light faces outward, and the protruding momentary switch rests against the middle or lower
part of the thumb. Flashlight is activated by squeezing it between fingers and thumb.
The weapon hand is brought together with the flashlight hand, as though performing a normal
two-hand hold, and the lower fingers of the flashlight hand are wrapped around the gripping
fingers of the weapon hand. Isometric tension is applied with the arms to steady the weapon.
Note: some people find that wrapping just the bottom two fingers (ring and little) of the flashlight hand
around the gun-gripping fingers improves alignment of flashlight beam with gun barrel.
However, quickly assuming this particular grip requires more practice.
History
Named for former FBI agent William Rogers. Andy Stanford writes that Rogers developed the technique
around the original Laser Products 6P flashlight, which had neither a gripping ring nor a protruding
momentary switch. The technique is easier to employ using the SureFire “Combat” series of flashlights,
which have both of these features.
Positive attributes
• Keeps flashlight beam well aligned with gun barrel.
• Enables steadier, two-hand support of weapon prior to shooting.
• Very little serious beam/grip displacement if properly executed.
• Efficient draw when carried with the SureFire proprietary holsters and other flashlight
holsters designed to carry the flashlight lens down.
Negatives attributes
• Works well only with small flashlights with end-mounted momentary switches.
• Proximity of hands increases chance of sympathetic contraction and hand confusion.
• Difficult to use with injured hand.
• Attempted alignment of flashlight beam with target can alter alignment of weapon with target,
and vice versa.
• Light is located center of mass, if unseen threats engage the light your body
is directly in the line of fire.
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 6:33:05 PM EST
I like to keep my hands separate when using the light. It is much quicker and more flexible for me. I modify the Rogers method. I hold the light the same way, the light hand is parallel to the gun hand and approx 3-6 inches away when actually shooting. This way I can search with the light and drive the weapon to the threat if need be.
Remember "Do not point your weapon at anything you don't intend on destroying"

Anyway, my opinion-it is a "handgun" I see to many people taking way to long getting into position and trying to stay in that position when firing.

Mark
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 7:11:44 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 7:21:50 PM EST
Get a X200 and call it a day. Or use the Harries aka back of hand to back of hand method. That is much easier, at least for me.
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 8:42:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/11/2004 8:48:42 PM EST by kenjgood]
Flashlight held between the index and middle fingers:


Flashlight held between the middle and ring fingers:



Personally I have rarely used this technique. Useful for range firing, not very useful for fighting/doing the things you really do when hunting people down in buildings.

However, to each his own.
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 9:11:53 PM EST
I agree with Maverick. When I practice low light shooting, I feel more comfortable with the Harries technique. Maybe because it's what my instructors taught. Maybe because I have a standard G2 instead of a dedicated Combatlight.

Try both methods and see what works best. Be sure to try actually shooting with the light whatever position you work with.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 1:17:15 AM EST
As Ken mentioned, start moving around and you will quickly see that both of the traditional methods are useless.

Mark
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 4:36:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By Maverick656: Or use the Harries aka back of hand to back of hand method. That is much easier, at least for me.


I like this method also. Since my home defense pistol is a Sig P225 I have no way to secure a weapons light so I use this method. I think once you find a method that suits you the most important thing is practice. When I go shooting I always dedicate about 3 mags to just refresh my self.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 6:12:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By kenjgood:
Flashlight held between the index and middle fingers:
strategosforum.com/images/rogers_sf_rs.jpg

Flashlight held between the middle and ring fingers:
strategosforum.com/images/rogers_sf_top_small.jpg


Personally I have rarely used this technique. Useful for range firing, not very useful for fighting/doing the things you really do when hunting people down in buildings.

However, to each his own.



Guru has spoken.

I too used Rogers as a low light fighting base until someone shown me the light. now I use FBI and Neck index as my low light method.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 8:19:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By SMGLee:

Originally Posted By kenjgood:
Flashlight held between the index and middle fingers:
strategosforum.com/images/rogers_sf_rs.jpg

Flashlight held between the middle and ring fingers:
strategosforum.com/images/rogers_sf_top_small.jpg


Personally I have rarely used this technique. Useful for range firing, not very useful for fighting/doing the things you really do when hunting people down in buildings.

However, to each his own.



Guru has spoken.

I too used Rogers as a low light fighting base until someone shown me the light. now I use FBI and Neck index as my low light method.



Count me in as another neck index convert! The neck index feels more natural and allows you to use your support hand for other tasks...
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