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12/11/2018 1:58:31 AM
Posted: 12/6/2018 7:27:50 AM EST
Up front I will say that I know the answer is "wait for your eye to heal" but whatevs, this is what's happening now and it might be interesting to discuss.

On Sept 27, 2018 I had surgery to repair a torn/detached retina. Vitrectomy and scleral buckle. Gas bubble, 10 days looking at the floor, the works. It's a long recovery. Up to a year for vision to return, and not necessarily return to what it was, just to settle at what I'll be left with.

When the gas bubble was in the way I couldn't see anything. Just light and movement. It was bad. As the gas bubble went away and I could see over it the vision was much clearer and I could pick up the ACSS reticle in my PA 1-6x scope. Obviously 6x is a lot clearer than 1x but I could see it. For reference, about a month post-op my vision was 20/400 although the whole field of view is back. The Leupold DPP I have is useless. The 7.5moa triangle is just a red fuzz. No distinction whatsoever. So magnified optics it is, at least for the foreseeable future.

So I decide that if the PA is good, something actually good would be better. I like the 1-6x but it's a pig. So I settle on a TA33 and talk myself into spending ACOG money. It arrives yesterday and I can't see the damn reticle. I can see through the little guy just fine with my bad eye. It's a little clearer than the PA on 3x as I hoped but there's just no reticle. I mean it's there, I can see it with my left eye, but nothing with righty.

So that leads me to my main question....is there some inherent difference in the way a traditional scope is constructed, the way the light travels through it, the internal location of the reticle... vs. a prism scope like an acog that would prevent someone with poor vision from seeing the reticle?
Link Posted: 12/6/2018 7:46:28 AM EST
At risk of stating the obvious, could it be that the PA 1-6 has an adjustable diopter that can compensate for your vision, while the ACOG has a fixed diopter?
Link Posted: 12/6/2018 8:06:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/6/2018 8:35:56 AM EST by brandon_]
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Originally Posted By doty_soty:
At risk of stating the obvious, could it be that the PA 1-6 has an adjustable diopter that can compensate for your vision, while the ACOG has a fixed diopter?
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Yeah, that's probably it. I hadn't considered the obvious

Oh well. I'll hang on to this thing for a few months and see if anything changes. I really want it to work out and I'll be bummed if I have to sell it for another lpvo.
Link Posted: 12/6/2018 8:57:18 AM EST
What he said.

Are you training with your other eye? Might be a good idea. I never even thought of it, I shoot with my left arm in case my right is out so reading this makes me think I need to shoot with my left eye some now.
Link Posted: 12/6/2018 9:05:38 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SScot:
What he said.

Are you training with your other eye? Might be a good idea. I never even thought of it, I shoot with my left arm in case my right is out so reading this makes me think I need to shoot with my left eye some now.
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Technically no, the most activity I've been cleared to do is the stationary bike 1-2x/week. I haven't asked but I'm sure shooting a rifle is out of the question for a few weeks yet; however, I can shoot left handed/left eyed with a rifle but not as well with a pistol.
Link Posted: 12/6/2018 9:58:30 AM EST
ACOGs do have their prisms set at a *45* angle....
Link Posted: 12/6/2018 3:18:24 PM EST
Like the others, I'd guess the reticle is out of focus for you.

Train your eye muscles. It really does work. It really does help.

You do not need to fire anything to do the training, just the aiming activity. Consider it an opportunity to do a LOT of dry firing.
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