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Posted: 2/15/2012 5:54:57 PM EDT
Buying my bcg tonight.. And ive been set on the Nib from spikes. However the more i think about it, The more im tryimg to figure out if the 129 bucks is worth it. Other then the ease of cleaning, what other advantages is their. I plan on running my bcg wet as i do the same with my xd40 and all my guns. if its not really worth it, then that 130 can get me a some federal 5.56 ammo.

Whats the overall verdict here in the community.

Link Posted: 2/15/2012 5:59:34 PM EDT
[#1]
From what I have seen posted some like them, some dont.

The reports of them performing WORSE then a standard BCG when they get dirty with not much oil has turned me completely off. Some people says they nearly seize up the gun if they get dirty with barely and oil and are left alone for a little bit.

Before I went to the range on Monday I cleaned off my chrome BCG with a napkin. Took me 2 minutes to completely clean it. But I forgot to put any oil on it. Guess what. It performed perfectly after 100+ rounds. I know that isn't a huge test or anything, but cycling it felt nice and slick even without oil.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 6:06:33 PM EDT
[#2]
My S.O. got me a Spike's NiB BCG (along with the Spike's NiB hammer and trigger set) for Valentines date...  (yeah, I know... she's super awesome).

I just put it in, probably get to the range this weekend or next.

Truthfully...  I'm not sure what the big deal is in terms of the Bolt Carrier group.   Its slick, yeah... but of all the installed AR15s out there, I don't think the standard phosphate BCG has been all THAT much trouble.   I guess we'll see if its a lot easier to clean up.   I'm still running it with lube, because... well, I am.   I'll run some wolf through the rifle as well as XM193 and see how easy it is to clean.

One area where I can say assuredly that the NiB treatment "shines" is on that trigger set.

My practice (which I always use) is to lightly polish the trigger and hammer engagements before installing.   I gave it an extremely light touch as I don't know how thick the NIB coating is, but damn... it produced a mirror shine very quickly... and was very clearly lighter and smother than the standard fire control parts that these replaced.   As in "wow" level difference.  I won't run a 2-stage trigger in my "battle/defense" carbine, so this was a pleasant result.

Ultimately, I think the BCG will wind up being similar to the Chromed BCG's...  a nice bit of "bling" but an upgrade most shooters can do without.   But I'll post back if I find myself as delighted with the BCG as I have been with the trigger set.

Hope that helps.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:13:20 PM EDT
[#3]
All the chromed BCGs I have ever seen were dull hard chromed and not shinny bumper chrome so I don't quite get what all the bling thing is supposed to be about.

Hard chrome was the specified finish for the BCG as designed by Stoner despite costing more than phosphate A.K.A. parkerized finish .

IMHO Its popular for BCGs for the same reasons its popular for rifle bores namely lubricity, corrosion resistance and wear resistance.

That they clean easier is only a side effect IMHE

Link Posted: 2/15/2012 7:29:39 PM EDT
[#4]
I ran my Nib Spikes BCG in 2 carbine courses with a BCM 11.5 hammer forged upper, i used it with a very light coat of Slip 2000 EWL. i the 2 days i ran it for over 700 rounds without relube and had zero malfuntions. it leaned up really quick and was still really slick feeling in the gun, not a real test but i like it well enough to use it in the 3 ARs i own, i probably wouldnt run it dry  but i really like the way it cleans up.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 8:59:16 PM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
All the chromed BCGs I have ever seen were dull hard chromed and not shinny bumper chrome so I don't quite get what all the bling thing is supposed to be about.

Hard chrome was the specified finish for the BCG as designed by Stoner despite costing more than phosphate A.K.A. parkerized finish .

IMHO Its popular for BCGs for the same reasons its popular for rifle bores namely lubricity, corrosion resistance and wear resistance.

That they clean easier is only a side effect IMHE



I use "bling" to denote the installation of "fancy" parts that aren't necessarily of proven performance enhancing quality but are (in my experience only) shown off at the range like one would show off fancy new aluminum rims on one's car.

I'm sure there are benefits, and I don't doubt the Stoner design....  I just am not convinced there's a material benefit.

As I say, I just installed a Nickel-Boron set and will post results....   Just color me skeptical for the time being.

Certainly meant no offense to those running chromed BCG's.
Link Posted: 2/15/2012 9:29:15 PM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
From what I have seen posted some like them, some dont.

The reports of them performing WORSE then a standard BCG when they get dirty with not much oil has turned me completely off. Some people says they nearly seize up the gun if they get dirty with barely and oil and are left alone for a little bit.

Before I went to the range on Monday I cleaned off my chrome BCG with a napkin. Took me 2 minutes to completely clean it. But I forgot to put any oil on it. Guess what. It performed perfectly after 100+ rounds. I know that isn't a huge test or anything, but cycling it felt nice and slick even without oil.


yep, i will never use NiB again, my personal experiences and a few of my friends showed they are worse than phosphate.

this video shows exactly what my NiB BCG did and what a few friends of mine did too

Link Posted: 2/15/2012 10:21:23 PM EDT
[#7]
Quoted:
Quoted:
From what I have seen posted some like them, some dont.

The reports of them performing WORSE then a standard BCG when they get dirty with not much oil has turned me completely off. Some people says they nearly seize up the gun if they get dirty with barely and oil and are left alone for a little bit.

Before I went to the range on Monday I cleaned off my chrome BCG with a napkin. Took me 2 minutes to completely clean it. But I forgot to put any oil on it. Guess what. It performed perfectly after 100+ rounds. I know that isn't a huge test or anything, but cycling it felt nice and slick even without oil.


yep, i will never use NiB again, my personal experiences and a few of my friends showed they are worse than phosphate.

this video shows exactly what my NiB BCG did and what a few friends of mine did too

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Flju7NvWJ3c&feature=player_embedded


Yep after seeing people report this I found that video.

So I just got out my SPR with the NOT-oiled chrome BCG that was fired 100+ times.  Its been sitting around for 3+ days after firing and it cycles as smooth as ever.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 2:15:17 AM EDT
[#8]
I think it is a little silly to "neglect" your rifle to a huge extent and then when it fails you blame it on something other than your neglect.

If you run hundreds of rounds through a completely dry rifle and then let it sit for weeks without cleaning you can't expect it to be in perfect form when you pull it out, even in your mind you should be able to see that carbon building up there and then cooling into a bond, think about how the tail end of your bolt gets just after a short range session, all that carbon right there.  Congrats you just glued your rifle shut.

This doesn't happen if you wipe off your BCG after shooting, a process that literally takes 30 seconds.

NiB gives you the ability to run your rifle actively without lube. It doesn't given you the ability to operate your rifle after actively gluing it shut.


With all of that said, I have run two for close to two years now and thousands of rounds with/without lubing. Both on a regular cleaning schedule and a very irregular. Never had a problem with function in any way. I will continue to run them dry.

Link Posted: 2/16/2012 2:45:06 AM EDT
[#9]
Interesting...  I've noticed my NiB bcg gets a little sticky when I let it sit for a few days without cleaning.  I run it with oil too.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 3:14:39 AM EDT
[#10]
I use a NiB Carrier that has the EXO technology by FailZero/UCT Coating and it has performed flawflessly...I do lightly lube the carrier. With all the craze of NiB I do think there is difference in whom companies go with to do their NiB plating. I see many carriers out their that are NiB but are not being done by FailZero/UCT coating but other plating companies. If a carrier is NOT done by FailZero/UCT Coating then I'll pass on it. I also asked the company that you can send parts into to have them NiB if they use FailZero/UCT Coating and they told me no...I was under the impression they did so I was glad I asked.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 3:17:31 AM EDT
[#11]
which way do they issue them to the military again?

I'll take that.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 3:21:42 AM EDT
[#12]
Quoted:
which way do they issue them to the military again?

I'll take that.


In the mortar tubes? Or the blackhawk helicopters?

Link Posted: 2/16/2012 3:29:56 AM EDT
[#13]
Quoted:
I use a NiB Carrier that has the EXO technology by FailZero/UCT Coating and it has performed flawflessly...I do lightly lube the carrier. With all the craze of NiB I do think there is difference in whom companies go with to do their NiB plating. I see many carriers out their that are NiB but are not being done by FailZero/UCT coating but other plating companies. If a carrier is NOT done by FailZero/UCT Coating then I'll pass on it. I also asked the company that you can send parts into to have them NiB if they use FailZero/UCT Coating and they told me no...I was under the impression they did so I was glad I asked.


The only other company that does it is WMDguns. Or actually they are the outlet from which you can purchase things costed with it. They are affiliated with a group of key players that used to work @ fail zero. Honestly based on the level of personal customer service I have experienced from those particular guys WHEN they worked at FZ I would follow them. Plus WMDguns seems to be quite a bit more willing to work custom for the customer.

You have to remember that UCT coatings is a much larger company and coating firearms components with NiB is not their only revenue source. They are a great company but between the lack of communication recently with their consumer base in the firearms world and the loss of those aforementioned key players I think they are getting passed up by WMDguns.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 4:18:39 AM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
I think it is a little silly to "neglect" your rifle to a huge extent and then when it fails you blame it on something other than your neglect.

If you run hundreds of rounds through a completely dry rifle and then let it sit for weeks without cleaning you can't expect it to be in perfect form when you pull it out, even in your mind you should be able to see that carbon building up there and then cooling into a bond, think about how the tail end of your bolt gets just after a short range session, all that carbon right there.  Congrats you just glued your rifle shut.

This doesn't happen if you wipe off your BCG after shooting, a process that literally takes 30 seconds.

NiB gives you the ability to run your rifle actively without lube. It doesn't given you the ability to operate your rifle after actively gluing it shut.


With all of that said, I have run two for close to two years now and thousands of rounds with/without lubing. Both on a regular cleaning schedule and a very irregular. Never had a problem with function in any way. I will continue to run them dry.




If you watched the video he had lubed his bcg becore his test. Me and my friends also lubed ours, the wierd thing was after 150-200 rnds the bcg was bone dry and super gritty like the video

I have never cleaned my guns at the range and in the 30 minutes it takes me to get home would lock up my NiB BCG, with phosphate i can wait till the next day to clean and i will be fine and bcg will still have oil on it
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 8:12:23 AM EDT
[#15]
Quoted:
which way do they issue them to the military again?

I'll take that.


Cause the military always does it the best...
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 8:17:24 AM EDT
[#16]
Why would anybody buy something that has the chance, even remote, of locking up your bolt carrier?  

This is asking for trouble in name of looking cool!
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 8:40:06 AM EDT
[#17]
Quoted:
Why would anybody buy something that has the chance, even remote, of locking up your bolt carrier?  

This is asking for trouble in name of looking cool!


I don't think anyone bought them in the name of looking cool.  We bought them because they appeared to make your rifle MORE reliable.  Everyone wants that.  Once you hold one in your hand with a light coating of oil on it, you realize just how slick they are.  This also helps with cleanup.  

I have 3 of these.  One is back at Spikes right now due to a coating issue.  It came from AIM with a black crust on the bolt tail.  They are replacing it.  The other 2 have been perfect and I haven't been able to mimic this malfunction with my 2 rifles and various types and quantities of ammo.  Right now they are running great with no seize up issue.  I do lube them the same as I do my regular BCG's.

Link Posted: 2/16/2012 8:52:23 AM EDT
[#18]
I haven't seen the seizing issue with either of the two BCG's I have, one from Spikes, the other coated by WMD.  Maybe I need to run them harder and not clean...
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 9:00:58 AM EDT
[#19]
Quoted:
I think it is a little silly to "neglect" your rifle to a huge extent and then when it fails you blame it on something other than your neglect.

If you run hundreds of rounds through a completely dry rifle and then let it sit for weeks without cleaning you can't expect it to be in perfect form when you pull it out, even in your mind you should be able to see that carbon building up there and then cooling into a bond, think about how the tail end of your bolt gets just after a short range session, all that carbon right there.  Congrats you just glued your rifle shut.

This doesn't happen if you wipe off your BCG after shooting, a process that literally takes 30 seconds.

NiB gives you the ability to run your rifle actively without lube. It doesn't given you the ability to operate your rifle after actively gluing it shut.


With all of that said, I have run two for close to two years now and thousands of rounds with/without lubing. Both on a regular cleaning schedule and a very irregular. Never had a problem with function in any way. I will continue to run them dry.



It is a FACT that NIB has glued bolts shut. Its not the user doing it, its the bolt. My phosphate and chrome BCG's dont do that.

You should see the picture of how dirty I got my phosphate BCG without cleaning.

Link Posted: 2/16/2012 9:30:36 AM EDT
[#20]
Quoted:
Quoted:




It is a FACT that NIB has glued bolts shut. Its not the user doing it, its the bolt. My phosphate and chrome BCG's dont do that.

You should see the picture of how dirty I got my phosphate BCG without cleaning.



Why do you think that the NiB BCGs do that?  You think that the NiB coating is creating the bond?  No it is the carbon, which is present in the rifle anyways, if you run a phosphate bolt without lube for hundreds of rounds and leave it without cleaning for weeks it will lock up too.

I still have not been able to repeat this with my NiB bolts.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 9:32:35 AM EDT
[#21]
I think the end of that video is the best advice––any time two metal objects wear against eachother they should be lubed, personally I love my NiB BCG.Forme the ease of cleaning was my biggest selling point.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 9:35:49 AM EDT
[#22]
Quoted:
If you run hundreds of rounds through a completely dry rifle and then let it sit for weeks without cleaning you can't expect it to be in perfect form when you pull it out,


Why not?  Mine do.  Phosphated bolts and carriers.  

The carbon the tail of the bolt does not "glue your rifle shut."  It's self-limiting.  Of the places where carbon build up is going to affect function, it is not one of them.  

~Augee
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 9:44:56 AM EDT
[#23]
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 9:54:15 AM EDT
[#24]
Quoted:
Quoted:
If you run hundreds of rounds through a completely dry rifle and then let it sit for weeks without cleaning you can't expect it to be in perfect form when you pull it out,


Why not?  Mine do.  Phosphated bolts and carriers.  

The carbon the tail of the bolt does not "glue your rifle shut."  It's self-limiting.  Of the places where carbon build up is going to affect function, it is not one of them.  

~Augee


Did not say the tail end was the problem area. I believe actually the problem area is around the gas ring area based on that video.  Not completely certain as I have not been able to replicate this problem but he noted that the issue was fixed with application of a couple of drops of lube in the lubrication holes of the carrier.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 10:52:17 AM EDT
[#25]
Quoted:
Quoted:
which way do they issue them to the military again?

I'll take that.


Cause the military always does it the best...


In this case they do
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 10:58:05 AM EDT
[#26]




Quoted:



Quoted:



Quoted:

which way do they issue them to the military again?



I'll take that.




Cause the military always does it the best...




In this case they do
Not really.  They did at one point, then they screwed it up going away from chrome to phosphate.



Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:36:50 AM EDT
[#27]
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it, regardless of how long it sat, feel "gritty"...  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:47:42 AM EDT
[#28]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:




It is a FACT that NIB has glued bolts shut. Its not the user doing it, its the bolt. My phosphate and chrome BCG's dont do that.

You should see the picture of how dirty I got my phosphate BCG without cleaning.



Why do you think that the NiB BCGs do that?  You think that the NiB coating is creating the bond?  No it is the carbon, which is present in the rifle anyways, if you run a phosphate bolt without lube for hundreds of rounds and leave it without cleaning for weeks it will lock up too.

I still have not been able to repeat this with my NiB bolts.


Not true I ran thousands of rounds through my Armalite without cleaning and I didn't have a single problem.











Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:52:23 AM EDT
[#29]
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:55:09 AM EDT
[#30]
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I guess I'm glad I'm smarter than their advertising.  The M16 was initially marketed as a rifle that didn't need to be cleaned too.  Carbon gets everywhere with these things.  If theres no oil on the BCG, no coating or lack thereof will be able to stop an unlubed bolt from sticking like that.

BTW, with your pictures you posted above, its quite evident that your 1000 round firing included either a massive amount of lube prior to firing, or the addition of it between strings.  Theres a lot of shiny shit on that rifle, and the person that you quoted was discussing that if you shot any BCG dry, the carbon would cause it to stick.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:55:21 AM EDT
[#31]
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I put as much lube on my NiB bcg as i did my phosphates and it still locked up my bolt, yet with phosphate i never had an issue
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:56:49 AM EDT
[#32]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I put as much lube on my NiB bcg as i did my phosphates and it still locked up my bolt, yet with phosphate i never had an issue


Who did you get your bolt from, and did adding lube in those holes loosen it up?
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:57:14 AM EDT
[#33]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I guess I'm glad I'm smarter than their advertising.  The M16 was initially marketed as a rifle that didn't need to be cleaned too.  Carbon gets everywhere with these things.  If theres no oil on the BCG, no coating or lack thereof will be able to stop an unlubed bolt from sticking like that.

BTW, with your pictures you posted above, its quite evident that your 1000 round firing included either a massive amount of lube prior to firing, or the addition of it between strings.  Theres a lot of shiny shit on that rifle, and the person that you quoted was discussing that if you shot any BCG dry, the carbon would cause it to stick.


Read the post above.



Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I put as much lube on my NiB bcg as i did my phosphates and it still locked up my bolt, yet with phosphate i never had an issue


Who did you get your bolt from, and did adding lube in those holes loosen it up?


That doesnt matter. The fact is that NiB is WORSE then a phosphate bolt. It was phosphate or chrome that WOULDN'T HAPPEN
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 11:59:56 AM EDT
[#34]
IMHO, is all marketing hype in our application.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:01:02 PM EDT
[#35]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:


That doesnt matter. The fact is that NiB is WORSE then a phosphate bolt. It was phosphate or chrome that WOULDN'T HAPPEN


This is your opinion, based on your experience. Not a fact that can be repeated by multiple people in multiple instances every time.

As I and others have stated, some of us have not had this problem despite it being documented by others.

Sorry man, I just have not been able to replicate this issue, and still believe NiB coated BCGs are superior to phosphate or chrome ones.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:04:08 PM EDT
[#36]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I put as much lube on my NiB bcg as i did my phosphates and it still locked up my bolt, yet with phosphate i never had an issue


Who did you get your bolt from, and did adding lube in those holes loosen it up?


I had a core-15 and a spikes NiB BCG. I applied 4 drops of oil(2 drops per exaust hole) 2 drops of oil on the cam pin and 1 drop per carrier rail.

That is the same procedure i follow for lubing my rifles before hitting the range. I fired 300 rounds through the rifles packed them up and headed home.

When i got home to clean my rifles they were both locked up like the video shows. After getting them to unlock the bolt was super gritty.

I then added 4 more drops to the bolt and it loosened up.

Now when i do this with phosphated bcg's they are still slick and lubed up once i get home.

IMO NiB is snakes oil
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:04:19 PM EDT
[#37]
Well my opinion is based on what I have seen. I have NEVER seen anyone has a single issue with a chrome BCG or phospate, but I have seen issues with overhyped, overpriced NiB BCG's

Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:09:18 PM EDT
[#38]
Quoted:
Well my opinion is based on what I have seen. I have NEVER seen anyone has a single issue with a chrome BCG or phospate, but I have seen issues with overhyped, overpriced NiB BCG's



You have never heard of people having issues with malfunctions due to lack of lubrication during a firing schedule?
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:13:40 PM EDT
[#39]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Well my opinion is based on what I have seen. I have NEVER seen anyone has a single issue with a chrome BCG or phospate, but I have seen issues with overhyped, overpriced NiB BCG's



You have never heard of people having issues with malfunctions due to lack of lubrication during a firing schedule?


Thats not the issue here. The issue here is that when a NiB bolt is correctly lubed and fired, after it sits for several hours the glues the bolt in place. Maybe NiB is too slick and the oil flies right off, but there is something about NiB that it doesnt retain oil like chrome and phosphate
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:23:51 PM EDT
[#40]
I am with durabo in that I have not been able to replecate the problem. The last time I took a class I fired close to 500 rounds and let the rifle sit for a week before i cleaned it––action was just a smooth as when i put the gun away. That was using tetra for lube.

Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:27:50 PM EDT
[#41]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Well my opinion is based on what I have seen. I have NEVER seen anyone has a single issue with a chrome BCG or phospate, but I have seen issues with overhyped, overpriced NiB BCG's



You have never heard of people having issues with malfunctions due to lack of lubrication during a firing schedule?


Thats not the issue here. The issue here is that when a NiB bolt is correctly lubed and fired, after it sits for several hours the glues the bolt in place. Maybe NiB is too slick and the oil flies right off, but there is something about NiB that it doesnt retain oil like chrome and phosphate


Ive never had that issue.  I just pulled out my rifle that was put away uncleaned, I think if I recall correctly that I put around 300 rounds through it last time I shot it. This was about 2 months ago... no issues charging it.  I will be going shooting again on the 25th and plan to put another 500 rounds through it, I will take pictures and test this out again then.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:28:25 PM EDT
[#42]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I guess I'm glad I'm smarter than their advertising.  The M16 was initially marketed as a rifle that didn't need to be cleaned too.  Carbon gets everywhere with these things.  If theres no oil on the BCG, no coating or lack thereof will be able to stop an unlubed bolt from sticking like that.

BTW, with your pictures you posted above, its quite evident that your 1000 round firing included either a massive amount of lube prior to firing, or the addition of it between strings.  Theres a lot of shiny shit on that rifle, and the person that you quoted was discussing that if you shot any BCG dry, the carbon would cause it to stick.


Read the post above.



Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
He put oil in the vent holes and it smoothed it right up.  So theres some gunk build up by the gas rings....otherwise that wouldn't make a damn bit of difference.  Lube your carrier the way you should any other, and you won't have a problem.  My guess is that if he fired it or let the bolt slam home, it wouldn't stick and would function fine.  NiB is not an excuse to not lube a firearm, or to under-lube it.  I've gotten dirty dry bolts to not want to go all the way into battery regardless of what coating was on it.  Sitting for a day or two or not.  It happens with them all.  Its a nice coating that makes clean up easier, and thats really about it.  

Maintain your weapon.   If you're lazy like me, enjoy your coated BCG


The reason I say NiB fails is that it is advertised as self lubricating and needing the least amount of lube compared to other coatings. Yet if you shoot it, and put it away it glues the BCG shut!


I put as much lube on my NiB bcg as i did my phosphates and it still locked up my bolt, yet with phosphate i never had an issue


Who did you get your bolt from, and did adding lube in those holes loosen it up?


That doesnt matter. The fact is that NiB is WORSE then a phosphate bolt. It was phosphate or chrome that WOULDN'T HAPPEN


It matters to me, hence why I asked the question.

You asked me to re-read the above post.  I have.  Most of them are mine.  Whats your point?

You seem like you like to do a lot of internet regurgitation.  While I appreciate your presence, in this case I'd really appreciate more if you'd stop misquoting things, stop telling those involved in the discussion that their questions don't matter, and let those with actual hands on experience have a conversation.

You're saying things like "fact" with out anything to back it up, and its really not doing anything to help us figure out if there is a problem, and then possibly figure out what it is.

To those who actually have these things, thank you for sharing your experiences.  I'll make sure I shoot mine and leave them be prior to cleaning to see if I can get the "problem" to replicate.

I have a feeling this has to do more with peoples lubrication habits rather than the coating.  Again, personally I've been able to get a phosphate BCG to feel gritty, stick, or not go into battery if I didn't lube it enough and got it dirty.  Just like what people with NiB BCG's reported, a few drops of oil in the right spot loosened it right up.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:32:33 PM EDT
[#43]
I'm saying it doesnt matter if he lubed it AFTER it he shot it. Because I dont do that with my phosphate or chrome BCG's. The maintenance of the rifle shouldn't matter. You are blaming it on the user not cleaning the rifle after its shot, but that shouldn't matter.

My pictures show that my oil didn't mysteriously disappear like what is happening with the NiB guys. I shot about 500 rounds of .22 and then squirt a little extra in, then I decided I wanted to see how long it would shoot for so I then shot over 2000 rounds of .22 and 1000 rounds of .223 without doing a thing. That just shows how well Slip 2000 EWL sticks around. Plus the lighting in my house sucks, so those picture were relying on the flash of the cmaera which overemphasizes anything that is shiny.








Here is my theory:
I'm thinking that NiB BCG's are acting up when they are in tighter upper receivers. The NiB possibly makes them slightly bigger, and if they dont hold onto oil as well as other BCG's then once the inside gets warm and dirty the lack of oil allows the dirty to dry out and "glue" the BCG to the receiver.

I know my chrome BCG was tight in my upper but I never had any issues because of it.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:48:08 PM EDT
[#44]
I choose to use funds saved from not buying NiB, for more ammo
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 12:59:19 PM EDT
[#45]
Quoted:
I'm saying it doesnt matter if he lubed it AFTER it he shot it. Because I dont do that with my phosphate or chrome BCG's. The maintenance of the rifle shouldn't matter. You are blaming it on the user not cleaning the rifle after its shot, but that shouldn't matter.

My pictures show that my oil didn't mysteriously disappear like what is happening with the NiB guys. I shot about 500 rounds of .22 and then squirt a little extra in, then I decided I wanted to see how long it would shoot for so I then shot over 2000 rounds of .22 and 1000 rounds of .223 without doing a thing. That just shows how well Slip 2000 EWL sticks around. Plus the lighting in my house sucks, so those picture were relying on the flash of the cmaera which overemphasizes anything that is shiny.

Here is my theory:
I'm thinking that NiB BCG's are acting up when they are in tighter upper receivers. The NiB possibly makes them slightly bigger, and if they dont hold onto oil as well as other BCG's then once the inside gets warm and dirty the lack of oil allows the dirty to dry out and "glue" the BCG to the receiver.

I know my chrome BCG was tight in my upper but I never had any issues because of it.



Have you ever had a NiB BCG? You seem to make a habit of posting about a lot of things on here based on what you've read, NOT experienced. Maybe you should sit back for a while and read and stop posting about things you have no PERSONAL experience with.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 1:09:59 PM EDT
[#46]
I dont have one, but I almost bought one several times. I'm basing what I'm posting on several very similar reports from different people and a video 87GN posted, who knows what he is talking about.

Just because a NiB worked for you doesnt mean they all work and there isn't something wrong with them. Its like me going around telling everyone a double star AR is better then a colt because mine survived a 5000 round torture test without lube. Just because it worked for one person, doesnt negate the issues other people are having.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 1:15:28 PM EDT
[#47]
Quoted:
I dont have one, but I almost bought one several times. I'm basing what I'm posting on several very similar reports from different people and a video 87GN posted, who knows what he is talking about.

Just because a NiB worked for you doesnt mean they all work and there isn't something wrong with them. Its like me going around telling everyone a double star AR is better then a colt because mine survived a 5000 round torture test without lube. Just because it worked for one person, doesnt negate the issues other people are having.


The problem is you don't know why other people are having issues.  How do I know that people here are properly lubing their bolt?  How do you?  You're making a ton of assumptions that aren't value added.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 1:17:36 PM EDT
[#48]
Quoted:
Quoted:
I dont have one, but I almost bought one several times. I'm basing what I'm posting on several very similar reports from different people and a video 87GN posted, who knows what he is talking about.

Just because a NiB worked for you doesnt mean they all work and there isn't something wrong with them. Its like me going around telling everyone a double star AR is better then a colt because mine survived a 5000 round torture test without lube. Just because it worked for one person, doesnt negate the issues other people are having.


The problem is you don't know why other people are having issues.  How do I know that people here are properly lubing their bolt?  How do you?  You're making a ton of assumptions that aren't value added.


I see 87GN as a very reputable source.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 1:21:05 PM EDT
[#49]
IG, my point is that you are young and very inexperienced (not a bad thing), but you post as if you have years of experience and know what you're talking about. In fact, you are simply regurgitating something someone else said or experienced. There are far too many people on this forum that do just that. If you have no experience with NiB BCGs, then stop posting as if you have some authoritative expertise with them. If 87GN,  or someone else like him with established credentials, posted info on the subject, defer to them or link to their posts/blogs.
Link Posted: 2/16/2012 1:23:58 PM EDT
[#50]
Quoted:

Here is my theory:
I'm thinking that NiB BCG's are acting up when they are in tighter upper receivers. The NiB possibly makes them slightly bigger, and if they dont hold onto oil as well as other BCG's then once the inside gets warm and dirty the lack of oil allows the dirty to dry out and "glue" the BCG to the receiver.




I think you may be on to something with your theory. The Nib does add a few ten thousandths to the part. If the BCG was already on the tight side (tolerance stacking), I could see where this could explain why some are experiencing this problem. If not on the tight side, they don't experience the problem.
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