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Posted: 5/12/2004 3:17:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/13/2004 6:51:08 PM EST by Krinkov556]
Performed initial cleaning on new upper with WD-40. Now understand the need for CLP. Read all I could find here (Yikes - Simple Green !!!) and also read manuals.

Question is do I need to clean off WD-40 before replacing with CLP (Break free in this case) or are they compatible such that cleaning in not necessary?
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 3:38:06 AM EST

BreakFree CLP doesn't mix well with other chemicals/lubes/cleaning agents. While WD-40 does tend to evaporate, it may leave a residue behind. You may want to consider something along the lines of brake cleaner or Gun Scrubber to completely strip the metal and start fresh with CLP... And as you've now discovered, CLP is all you'll really need...
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 5:34:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/13/2004 5:43:01 PM EST by Krinkov556]
As a follow up I e-mailed Break-Free tech help with the following question;

"I will normally apply a light coat of WD-40 on a rifle that I own in order
to help in rust prevention. I would like to start using Break-Free in this
application but I've heard that your product is incompatible with certain
lubricants. Question I have is ;

Should I remove all of the WD-40, with either Gun Scrub or similiar product,
prior to Break-Free application or can I simply remove most of the WD-40 (by
either wiping or using compressed air) before Break-Free application."

This is the reply I received from Break-Free tech help;

"There is no incompatibility problem. We go to the surface where we belong
and lift off the other materials. For some lubricant manufacturers they may
consider that as incompatible. Break-Free is very tenacious and wets the
surface very well. Every little opening is going to get treated as we soak
into the surface structure. That's one of the reasons we work as a Bore
Cleaner because we really do get things wet. As our CLP is used the other
film or films will be replaced over time until we are the primary material
working for you. If any other questions occur just let us know.

-Technical Support"

BTW;
http://www.break-free.com/index.htm
Click "more info"button to send e-mail to technical support
Link Posted: 5/13/2004 7:24:21 PM EST
The only oil Ive had problems with Break Free being combined with was LSA.That happened back in the early 1990's when it contained chlorinated solvents and is probably to blame.Not really a problem just a thickening of the two.
Hosed the upper down with Break Free and scrubbed with a tooth brush to remove it all and not issue.
Ive cleaned many used weapons with Break Free that were coated with who knows what and no problem.
Ive used Break Free after using WD40 to remove cosmolene and no problems to report.
If in doubt just soak the metal down with Break Free and let stand for a few,then wipe off and go at it again.
Break Free has been around for decades and I have yet to hear or see a real problem.Probably the most tested and used gun oil ever.
I hate those aerosol solvents.Not to mention solvent residues are more damaging to lubes than anything.
Raymond
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