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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/3/2005 5:56:21 AM EDT
Good morning all, I'm preparing to order some moly resin and refinish some firearms and have the following questions:

1) has anyone used moly resin on an older, blued weapon where the blueing wasn't consistant? I have a very old revolver that the bluing has worn off in places, and wanted to protect the bare metal. I have gotten all the scratches out with 1200# sandpaper, but parts of the gun (barrel, mostly) still have all the bluing in good shape. Is it necessary to strip the blueing first, or will the moly resin stick to the blueing?

2) Has anyone used the stainless steel moly resin? Specifically, I would like to see pics of a part/weapon refinished that way to get an idea of color, and also, will the stainless steel dust clog the nozzle of an airbrush? (I am using a little Testor's hobby airbrush I have lying around)
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 10:33:02 AM EDT
I haven't used the stainless yet, but I will be in a couple of weeks. I would recommend that you rough up the bluing considerably before you coat it. I blast everything with 90 grit aluminum oxide for best results.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 11:30:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jockeys:
Good morning all, I'm preparing to order some moly resin and refinish some firearms and have the following questions:

1) has anyone used moly resin on an older, blued weapon where the blueing wasn't consistant?

Is it necessary to strip the blueing first, or will the moly resin stick to the blueing?




If you don't sand/ abrasive (not bead blast), you are goign to be a very unhappy person. Norrells won't hold up well on a polished surface.


Link Posted: 10/3/2005 12:16:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Stickman:
If you don't sand/ abrasive (not bead blast), you are goign to be a very unhappy person. Norrells won't hold up well on a polished surface.



what grit paper do you recommend using to "rough up" the blueing?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 12:50:49 PM EDT
I don't recommend sandpaper, I recommend sandblasting.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 1:53:07 PM EDT
assuming I am not able to find a place that offers sandblasting, (I am way out in the middle of nowhere) would it be feasible to do it with extremely rough sandpaper/emory cloth?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 3:30:06 PM EDT
You can do it however you like, but I'm telling you that it isn't going to hold up very well with sandpaper/ emery/ crocus/ wetdry/ sanding sponges/ steelwool, or anything else I can think of.

Give it a try and see how it works out for you. The worst that happens is that you need to sandblast it and do it again. You may find that you are able to rough it up enough to work for you. but it isn't going to be an accurate version of how well it holds up on a properly prepared surface.


Believe me, I wish there was another way.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 3:39:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 3:50:35 PM EDT by thebomber]
I've used Norrel's Molycoat extensively. Most of the surfaces have been parked. I did however do a Mossberg 500 shotgun that was blued. I didn't have any issues at all with adherence. Make sure you degrease and preheat.


YMMV


Bomber

ETA: From their website molyresin.com

Moly Resin™ will adhere to all metals including the following: aluminum, carbon steel, stainless steel, sandblasted and glass beaded metal, cast iron and aluminum, titanium, copper, silver solder, blued or parkerized finish, anodized, nickel and chrome plate, and many plastics, etc. Note: nickel and chrome plated surfaces should be abrasive blasted to allow the best adhesion of the Resin. For all metals, best overall results are achieved on freshly sandblasted surfaces.

So it does to stick to blued surfaces which is my experience. They do however say sandblaster surfaces give best overall results.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:33:18 PM EDT
What do you expect the website to say?

I've done blued and nonblued slides, and the level of wear that they will take is quite different.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 6:00:09 AM EDT
ok, so from what I'm getting here, the problem is that moly resin just won't stick as securely to things that are smooth, but will prolly stay on if the wepon is babied. that makes good sense. the two weapons i'm redoing are a benelli nova (parked, rough finish) and that old revolver, i'll try and get the revolver blasted at a paintshop or something.

thanks for all the helpful advice!
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 8:16:34 AM EDT
I think you are going to be much happier this way.
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