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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 7/21/2004 7:08:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2004 7:09:44 PM EST by FishKepr]
I finished my first build a few months ago using a video instruction manual. I just picked up a copy of the Army/Air Force tech manual and it says to put moly grease on the threads of the extension tube. The video manual did not say anything about this.

What is the purpose of the grease? A local hardware store sells it cheap so its no big deal to get it, but do I really need it?
Link Posted: 7/21/2004 8:19:52 PM EST
YES you do need it!

Link Posted: 7/22/2004 4:21:42 AM EST
Why do you need it? What purpose does it serve? Not saying that you don't need it because I don't know if you do or not. I have read that you need it and then I have read that you do not need it. I have read to use locktite then I have read that if you use locktite you are going to hell.

Someone please give the real story. I didn't used any grease and I put locktite on the castle nut. Why purpose does the grease serve?

Thanks,
James
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 5:10:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2004 5:12:03 AM EST by Lester_Burnham]
It's to keep the threads from seizing should you ever need to remove or replace the receiver extension. Also makes the initial installation easier.
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 5:20:44 AM EST
The barrel extension is steel, the upper receiver aluminum. They can react with one another and seize up. I use anti-seize, the silver stuff sold at automotive stores.
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 6:24:02 AM EST
Cool! I will pick some up and reinstall my receiver extention. It makes the install easier? Didn't think it could get much easier

James
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 8:28:51 AM EST

Hey Cannibal! Is the anti-seize you're using Permatex? The silver does have graphite in it which isn't a good thing for an aluminum/steel connection... I've been using the Permatex Copper anti-seize I picked up at the NAPA store. No graphite and takes high heat...
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 9:43:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2004 9:46:28 AM EST by Lester_Burnham]

Originally Posted By JBritt:
Cool! I will pick some up and reinstall my receiver extention. It makes the install easier? Didn't think it could get much easierhr


I'm not very strong.LOL, I guess that did sound funny. I just meant sometimes the new anodizing will be a little rough, or tolerance stackup can cause a tight fit, and the grease makes the initial threading in easier.
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 10:20:18 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2004 10:20:56 AM EST by DV8Mind]
I've also read that you need to use Moly when putting these parts together, and it makes sense to me.

But...I recently picked up Walt Kuleck & Clint McKee's book on assembleing AR15's (Fulton Armory) and he says you should use LOCTITE! WTF?[/
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 10:42:43 AM EST
Can you use just regular automotive antisieze? Is Anti-seize able to standup to the temperatures created? It is only good up to 1600 degrees. I think moly can take much higher temperatures.
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 11:00:13 AM EST
Auto anti-seize would be OK, as long as there's no graphite as DarkStar pointed out. I get that stuff all over everything when I use it though, I stick to moly grease.
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 11:01:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By DarkStar:
Hey Cannibal! Is the anti-seize you're using Permatex? The silver does have graphite in it which isn't a good thing for an aluminum/steel connection... I've been using the Permatex Copper anti-seize I picked up at the NAPA store. No graphite and takes high heat...



Hmmm... not sure of the brand name, but its the silver stuff that gets all over the place quite easily. I've heard arguments against graphite, but some guys have been using it for years without issue. Considering all the automotive applications, I'm not real worried about it.
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 1:01:27 PM EST
Where can you get moly grease?
Link Posted: 7/22/2004 1:14:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By bigkracka:
Where can you get moly grease?




As posted in the many "Moly Grease" threads : HONDA service dept, a small packet comes in the brake pad kits... Ask a tech if he has an extra packet you can have. I have some I'll trade for a bottle of Pepsi.
Link Posted: 7/23/2004 10:04:43 PM EST
Or you can buy a small jar of it from Bushmaster, but it's way more than you need for a lifetime.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:03:25 PM EST
OK, I went to a local auto parts store today and picked up a small can of Coastal "Industrial Moly EP Grease". It is Lithium based and does not say "graphite" on it anywhere. I figured for $2 I had little to lose.

Is this stuff OK or should I get something else?
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:57:37 PM EST
EXTENSION TUBE or BARREL NUT?
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 4:05:56 PM EST
Extension tube.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 6:06:11 AM EST
Uhoh. Let's say I have a "friend" who just put moly grease that seems to have graphite (it's a black moly grease" on the threads of his extension tube. Just how bad would this be and what problems may I expect? Is it more of a "you really shouldn't do this" thing, or a "My GOD man, the horror of what you've just done! Get it offf now!" thing?
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 10:30:54 AM EST
Anti-seize that contains copper and aluminum is for use on steel to steel, NOT for steel on aluminum. The metals in the anti-seize will be ground into the soft aluminum receiver.

Moly grease (plain old wheel bearing grease) is fine on the barrel nut and the Rifle receiver extension.

For the CAR extension and castle nut, dry, with ONE drop of SERVICE REMOVABLE Locktite.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 11:25:01 AM EST
I just went with a drop or two of blue loctite on my extension and castle nut, dry, no lube on my M4gery. Am I wrong here? With the castle nut wrench it breaks right free and doesnt loosen up during use.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 5:20:35 PM EST
Cleophis, 100% right.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 5:29:05 PM EST
Thanks Free Man. I feel better now. What's with purple loctite? I've always used blue for just about everything AR15 related (KAC access., sling swivels, etc.) where a screw needs to be set, but not needing heat to get it off.
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 9:25:44 AM EST
Newbie assembler here; I used a black moly lube on my buffer tube threads. It may have graphite in it. How severe of a threat is this? Is it severe enough that I should immediately disassemble and degrease? I used the same lube on the buffer spring (not drowned; just touches) and on the threads of the various screws for my ACE stock.

Do I need to get this stuff off of there and use a different lube?
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 11:50:23 AM EST
If it has graphite in it, get it off anything aluminum. It isn't a problem with steel or plastic. It causes a galvanic reaction between the steel and the aluminum, causing it to corrode. It is a long term process, so dropping everything, running home and cleaning it off isn't necessary. Just clean it off in the near future.
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 12:44:38 PM EST
OK, the purple is for smaller screws, as in set screws and instruments, and the blue is for larger (over 1/4") screws. Both inhibit screw movement, but can be loosened with hand tools. I got this info off Loctite's product site. I've always used blue for everything firearm related and had no trouble. Nothing comes loose during normal use, but if you need to remove the screws, you can with proper fitting tools.


Originally Posted By Cleophis:
Thanks Free Man. I feel better now. What's with purple loctite? I've always used blue for just about everything AR15 related (KAC access., sling swivels, etc.) where a screw needs to be set, but not needing heat to get it off.

Link Posted: 8/2/2004 5:17:32 PM EST
Do I need to put Moly grease where the buffer tube screws into the receiver?
Link Posted: 8/3/2004 4:44:04 AM EST
I noticed when i took my barrel out of the receiver, the Bushmaster factory had put some moly grease on the threads of the upper and on the part of the barrel extension that fits in the receiver. So when reassembling, these are the 2 places that got a bit of grease.
Link Posted: 8/3/2004 10:43:15 AM EST
What color was the grease? Just curious.
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 1:47:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By bigkracka:
Do I need to put Moly grease where the buffer tube screws into the receiver?



Yes, that's where it goes, tube to receiver contact. If desired, use loctite, blue, on the tube where the castle nut tightens.

/S2
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 1:49:09 PM EST
Sulaco, thanks.

Link Posted: 8/4/2004 1:49:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2004 1:56:57 PM EST by bigkracka]
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 5:10:17 PM EST
OK!! All these words and products. What should I use, what is it called, and where do I get it?? I have looked at sooo many greases that I am confused, have done internet search, and called vendors, and still "Have No Clue" what to buy!! Give me the "WORD", and I can assemble my two new projects and start shootinghanks[
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 5:16:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By cajunbill:
OK!! All these words and products. What should I use, what is it called, and where do I get it?? I have looked at sooo many greases that I am confused, have done internet search, and called vendors, and still "Have No Clue" what to buy!! Give me the "WORD", and I can assemble my two new projects and start shooting.-Thanks Coonie[[



From the "Build your own upper" sticky: "Molybdenum-Disulfide grease (per the TM) This is for the upper receiver threads. This is found at any auto parts store or hardware store for cheap."
Link Posted: 8/5/2004 4:23:30 AM EST

Originally Posted By macros73:
What color was the grease? Just curious.



It was brownish/yellowish. This may have been a result of some fouling from shooting ~6000 rounds though.
Link Posted: 8/5/2004 4:26:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By cajunbill:
OK!! All these words and products. What should I use, what is it called, and where do I get it?? I have looked at sooo many greases that I am confused, have done internet search, and called vendors, and still "Have No Clue" what to buy!! Give me the "WORD", and I can assemble my two new projects and start shooting.-Thanks Coonie[[



As a fellow LA resient, I had a hell of a time finding Moly grease locally ( I live in BR). Reg places like Lowes or Home Depot only carry lithium type grease. And auto parts stores only seemed to have graphite or copper based antiseize. I ended up breaking down and ordering the grease direct from Bushmaster and adding some other things to my list to offset shipping.
Bushmaster Moly Grease
Link Posted: 8/5/2004 12:32:27 PM EST
Guys, for moly grease, buy ordinary WHEEL BEARING grease made for disk brakes (higher temp).

Do not use anti-seize compounds with powdered metal (silver or copper colored stuff). The metal particles will be ground into the soft aluminum. Anti-seize compounds with metals are for steel on steel.

Don't make these little jobs (buttstocks, etc) harder than they really are.

Why do we put grease on the threads of the barrel nut and upper receiver when installing the barrel? For easy disassembly when changing barrels? NO. In my opinion, when a barrel is worn out, it is time for a whole new upper receiver, too. The purpose of the grease is so that the nut can be smoothly tightened up without damaging the threads. 30-80 ft-lb's can be a lot of stress on soft aluminum. You just on't need anti-seize here.

No need for grease on the receiver extension. You can, it won't hurt. But on the CAR buttstock, especially, you want it to stay on without being unscrewed. This won't happen on the rifle buttstock due to design, but can on the CAR buttstock. No grease, just some SERVICE REMOVABLE Locktite. SERVICE REMOVABLE means you can take it apart later.

If you need some grease for AR assembly, wheel bearing grease, or even the stuff in your grease gun will work just fine.

KISS!
Link Posted: 8/5/2004 2:36:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
Guys, for moly grease, buy ordinary WHEEL BEARING grease made for disk brakes (higher temp).

Do not use anti-seize compounds with powdered metal (silver or copper colored stuff). The metal particles will be ground into the soft aluminum. Anti-seize compounds with metals are for steel on steel.

Don't make these little jobs (buttstocks, etc) harder than they really are.

Why do we put grease on the threads of the barrel nut and upper receiver when installing the barrel? For easy disassembly when changing barrels? NO. In my opinion, when a barrel is worn out, it is time for a whole new upper receiver, too. The purpose of the grease is so that the nut can be smoothly tightened up without damaging the threads. 30-80 ft-lb's can be a lot of stress on soft aluminum. You just on't need anti-seize here.

No need for grease on the receiver extension. You can, it won't hurt. But on the CAR buttstock, especially, you want it to stay on without being unscrewed. This won't happen on the rifle buttstock due to design, but can on the CAR buttstock. No grease, just some SERVICE REMOVABLE Locktite. SERVICE REMOVABLE means you can take it apart later.

If you need some grease for AR assembly, wheel bearing grease, or even the stuff in your grease gun will work just fine.

KISS!



I just wanted to say thanks for being on the boards and offering your widsom. I cannot count the times that I have gotten paranoid over things like putting on a bbl, extention tube etc. because of all the complicated processes people say you have to do (you know what I am talking about). I am pretty new to ARs, I have only build 1 and half of another one. After all the confusion, you come along and make it all very simple.

Link Posted: 8/5/2004 5:32:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2004 5:33:53 PM EST by A_Free_Man]
Thanks, guy!

BigAl! In Louisiana? Baton Rouge? There must be a gazillion industrial hardware and lubricant supply places. Or go to a boat shop, where they work on outboard motors. It is just grease, like used on bearings.

And if you can't easily find "moly" grease, just get some ordinary wheel bearing grease.
Link Posted: 8/5/2004 6:50:17 PM EST
Yeah if I had known I could just use an ordinary wheel bearing grease, I would've done that instead of paying a whole lot more to get it from BM. Maybe next time I re-barrel an upper.
Link Posted: 8/7/2004 7:19:54 AM EST
I just received confirmation from Valvoline that their Moly-Fortified Multi-Purpose grease, part # 632, does NOT contain any graphite. I didn't think it did, but thought I would check before passing the info along. I buy mine at NAPA.
Link Posted: 8/7/2004 8:44:12 PM EST
There you are, Valvoline. It does not have to say on the can "Mil spec moly grease especially made for M16's".
Link Posted: 8/8/2004 5:29:17 AM EST
I got a pot of Moly grease from Bushmaster. You know its the right stuff, because they use it.
If you want to play it safe I would just order a pot of it from them. It lastes for ages, so one pot will do a lot of gun jobs you may have in the future.
Thats just my opinion though!!!
Link Posted: 8/8/2004 11:38:54 AM EST
I use a jar of Hoppes Moly Paste.

Link Posted: 9/8/2004 7:04:30 PM EST
Awesome! Since I'm going to be using a 6 position stock, I don't have to worry myself with this problem any more!
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 3:12:42 PM EST
I gotta 2 ounce tube of PRE-BAN Moly grease that I'll let go for $197.63.
Better act quick 'cause this will sell quick !

Link Posted: 9/12/2004 9:45:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By Feedingcannibal:
The barrel extension is steel, the upper receiver aluminum. They can react with one another and seize up. I use anti-seize, the silver stuff sold at automotive stores.

Aluminum will actually corrode steel . That is why auto manufacturers put a thin piece of plastic between them . I suppose the grease will also act as a gasket between them .
Link Posted: 9/13/2004 3:18:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/13/2004 3:21:30 PM EST by g3_ultra]

Originally Posted By bigkracka:
Where can you get moly grease?



"MolyKote G-n Metal Assembly Paste" made by Dow-Corning. Go to www.dowcorning.com and call or e-mail and ask for a free sample. A small tube will last a lifetime of barrel changes. It's really good stuff.
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