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Posted: 12/24/2003 2:24:10 PM EDT
Any recommendations for lube on a barrel install? Moly-lube, anti-seize, motor oil?
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 2:47:07 PM EDT
I always used Permatex anti-sieze, it has the mil-spec rating.
Link Posted: 12/24/2003 10:40:20 PM EDT
Use Moly Bi... You can get it at any car shop for $10 or less for a pound or two...
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 5:57:45 AM EDT
Moly lube. So says the Marine Corps tech manual.
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 6:07:31 AM EDT
When you guys say moly-lube do you mean moly-slide lubricating paste, is it the same stuff[?]
Link Posted: 12/25/2003 6:41:39 AM EDT
Anything that doesn't gall or contain graphite. "Moly" is short for [url=http://www.rosemill.com/lubricants.htm]molybdenum disulfide[/url] or MoS2.
Link Posted: 12/26/2003 4:39:38 PM EDT
In plain English, wheel bearing grease.
Link Posted: 12/27/2003 1:50:06 AM EDT
And a little of the Moly Disulfide grease will last you a looooooooooong time.
Link Posted: 12/27/2003 4:22:02 PM EDT
I'm just wondering, why would you not use something like Loc-Tite, which will keep this nut from backing out as you shoot?
Link Posted: 12/27/2003 5:12:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Timanator: I'm just wondering, why would you not use something like Loc-Tite, which will keep this nut from backing out as you shoot?
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Well if you ever want to change that barrel your cook is goosed.
Link Posted: 12/27/2003 8:39:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Timanator: I'm just wondering, why would you not use something like Loc-Tite, which will keep this nut from backing out as you shoot?
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Anti seize is exactly that, LocTite doesn't provide that. The barrel nut can only "back out" as far as the gas tube allows it to.
Link Posted: 12/27/2003 8:47:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/27/2003 10:47:50 PM EDT
Also not to forget that if you use Loctite where appropriate (not in THIS situation), it can melt so it's not even good enough for some applications where the part will get really hot.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 5:37:40 PM EDT
Just removed a barrel from a shorty I built about 12 years ago. The moly wheel bearing grease on the threads still looked fine, no problems backing off the barrel nut. This rifle was heated up a number of times. I just see no need for antisieze compound here. In fact, the smoother moly grease has always seemed to do just fine for me.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 6:57:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By notack: I always used Permatex anti-sieze, it has the mil-spec rating.
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Permatex markets several different types of anti-sieze. An anti-sieze lubricant, copper anti-sieze and nickel anti-sieze. All three are rated Mil-Spec yet the anti-sieze lubricant contains graphite. The copper and nickel anti-sieze are graphite free. I've always used the nickel anti-sieze for barrel nuts and receiver extensions... Overkill? Maybe... [url]www.permatex.com[/url]
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 8:12:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Tweak: Anything that doesn't gall or contain graphite. "Moly" is short for [url=http://www.rosemill.com/lubricants.htm]molybdenum disulfide[/url] or MoS2.
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Is there some sort of bad chemistry with graphite? I'm asking because I used a high temperature synthetic brake caliper grease containing molybdenum disulfide, graphite and teflon.
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 9:10:25 PM EDT
From [url]http://www.bmpcoe.org/guideline/books/4855/0001aa60.html[/url]
GRAPHITE Graphite is a material that is both a good conductor and a good lubricant. However, this material acts electrochemically like a noble metal and is cathodic (corrosive) to all structural metals. It is especially destructive when in contact with aluminum. Because of its extreme corrosiveness, graphite lubricants in any form should not be used on naval aeronautical equipment. When graphite is unavoidably present, as in graphite composite structural parts, ensure that insulation is applied to electrically isolate any avionic component from contact with the graphite composite.
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From MIL-STD-889 Active (Anodic) End ------------------------------------ Magnesium Mg alloy AZ-31B Mg alloy HK-31A Zinc (hot-dip, die cast, or plated) Beryllium (hot pressed) Al 7072 clad on 7075 Al 2014-T3 Al 1160-H14 Al 7079-T6 Cadmium (plated) Uranium Al 218 (die cast) Al 5052-0 Al 5052-H12 Al 5456-0, H353 Al 5052-H32 Al 1100-0 Al 3003-H25 [b]Al 6061-T6[/b] Al A360 (die cast) Al 7075-T6 Al 6061-0 Indium Al 2014-0 Al 2024-T4 Al 5052-H16 Tin (plated) Stainless steel 430 (active) Lead Steel 1010 Iron (cast) Copper (plated, cast, or wrought) Nickel (plated) Chromium (Plated) Tantalum AM350 (active) Stainless steel 310 (active) Stainless steel 301 (active) Stainless steel 304 (active) Stainless steel 430 (active) Stainless steel 410 (active) Stainless steel 17-7PH (active) Tungsten Niobium (columbium) 1% Zr Brass, Yellow, 268 Uranium 8% Mo. Brass, Naval, 464 Yellow Brass Muntz Metal 280 Brass (plated) Nickel-silver (18% Ni) Stainless steel 316L (active) Bronze 220 Copper 110 Red Brass Stainless steel 347 (active) Molybdenum, Commercial pure Copper-nickel 715 Admiralty brass Stainless steel 202 (active) Bronze, Phosphor 534 (B-1) Monel 400 Stainless steel 201 (active) Carpenter 20 (active) Stainless steel 321 (active) Stainless steel 316 (active) Stainless steel 309 (active) Stainless steel 17-7PH (passive) Silicone Bronze 655 Stainless steel 304 (passive) Stainless steel 301 (passive) Stainless steel 321 (passive) Stainless steel 201 (passive) Stainless steel 286 (passive) Stainless steel 316L (passive) AM355 (active) Stainless steel 202 (passive) Carpenter 20 (passive) AM355 (passive) A286 (passive) Titanium 5A1, 2.5 Sn Titanium 13V, 11Cr, 3Al (annealed) Titanium 6Al, 4V (solution treated and aged) Titanium 6Al, 4V (anneal) Titanium 8Mn Titanium 13V, 11Cr 3Al (solution heat treated and aged) Titanium 75A AM350 (passive) Silver Gold [b]Graphite[/b] ---------------------------------- Passive (Cathodic) End The closer two materials are to each other on the chart the less likely the chances of galvanic corrosion. Galvanic corrosion can be increased by the presence of electrical current, chloride, vibration, and other common factors. Attaching the nut [b]without[/b] a non conducting agent (moly) isn't much of an option [url=http://www.finishing.com/102/17.html]either[/url].
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