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Posted: 1/12/2006 6:56:29 AM EDT
As the title says, for Leupold 6.5x20 VXIII scopes with 30mm tube. Is the 50mm objective worth the extra $130+?

I have a 3.5x10 VXIII 50mm Obj scope on my deer rifle and enjoy the low light capability, but wondered if it makes that much of a difference during daylight shooting.

I only want to cry once.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:14:06 AM EDT
I pondered this too a while back. I was told that anything bigger than 44mm is overkill. Supposedly the eye cannot perceive the increased amount of light transmission between 44 and 50+mm. I don't care for 50mm because it tends to sit the optic up too high. I think magnification and clarity is more important than objective size for varminting use in daylight hours. MJD
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 9:27:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 10:32:17 PM EDT by ru4freedom]
I have the Leupold VX-III 4.5-14 Long Range in both 40 & 50mm Obj. & I do notice a bit more clarity & brightness in normal daylight with the 50mm ...., but it is very close!!

The 50mm is definatly brighter in low light!!

I have the 50mm on a Rem. 700 LV SF & the 40mm my Colt MT H-Bar II & like that particular size configuration on each rifle respectively.

And as far as I know the 30mm tube does not do anything for light transmition..., it is basicly for extreme elevation & windage adjustment!!

You'll love the VX-III...., I had a 6.5-20x44mm Zeiss Conquest but sold it after getting my first VX-III!!!

Both of my VX-III's have the Varmint Hunters Reticle...., that too is AWESOME!!

My opinion would be that the 50mm is not worth an extra $130

If you haven't yet...., take a look at the VX-III 4.5-14x? Long Range I think it's the best bang for the buck, and a perfect compromise between physical size vs. magnification!!

Try these guys, www.brunoshooters.com they usually have the best prices I've found for Leupold

Leupold rules!!
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 9:35:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 9:36:56 PM EDT by ReconJack]

Originally Posted By highwayman:
I pondered this too a while back. I was told that anything bigger than 44mm is overkill. Supposedly the eye cannot perceive the increased amount of light transmission between 44 and 50+mm. I don't care for 50mm because it tends to sit the optic up too high. I think magnification and clarity is more important than objective size for varminting use in daylight hours. MJD



I have the 50mm on an M1A and even with the low mounts it does set to high. I had to get the nylon cheek rest from SA to get a good cheekweld.
As for clarity, I have tried both sizes, but nothing works like the Ilumina lens! (I use the yellow) If you put that on a 44mm you will definetely notice a big difference in the light, during darker hours or looking into shadowy areas, it really brightens up the image. I wished I would have got the 44mm with that lens, it is only about 40 bucks.

ReconJack
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 9:59:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 10:02:37 PM EDT by ru4freedom]
ReconJack;

Have you seen Leupold's new VX-L Series for ultra low mounting?

They claim you can mount a VX-L 50mm as low as a typical 36mm

Might be the ticket for your M1A
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 4:15:08 AM EDT
It depends on how much you are going to shoot at high magnification. A 4 - 5mm exit pupil will allow about all the availble light to enter your eye, anything else is overkill and the only added benefit is head position isn't as critical. Exit pupil is calculated by obj diameter/magnification power.

So at 20x, a 40mm obj gives you 2mm, a 50mm obj gives you 2.5mm.

At 12x, a 40mm gives you just under 3.5mm, a 50mm gives you just over 4mm.

At 10x, you get 4 and 5mm respectively. So that's the mag that will work most comfortably for you, anything above that and the 50mm will be a bit friendlier to your eye. It may come down though figuring out what heigth rings you'd need for the 50mm and then to see if your cheek/head position is comfortable with your stock.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 11:09:43 AM EDT
It definately makes a difference at higher magnifications in low light.
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