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Link Posted: 4/1/2013 5:03:17 PM EDT
Already been done


















Except they melted the legos.
Link Posted: 4/2/2013 1:19:20 PM EDT
Ebola, good April Fool's joke. We're not planning on melting them - the 3D printing folks @ Defense Distributed already have that end of the market cornered.

Quake, individual pieces run as low as $.10 per item. The cheapest I've ever seen lowers before the latest panic was $56/ea, & there was a minimum order of 30. I don't know if we can do it with 560 pieces or not - I rather think the receiver proper will have considerably less than that. If we have to do the thumbhole stock out of bricks, I can see us hitting 560 easily, unless we can use Duplos for much of the buttstock. If you start counting parts used in custom magazines & extended length receivers, we could blow well over 560 pieces.
Link Posted: 4/3/2013 7:26:45 PM EDT
From Bob over @ Weaponeer.net:



This is a sketch of a side build, including thumbhole stock. The buffer tube is enclosed by PVC pipe.
Link Posted: 4/27/2013 6:18:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2013 8:43:02 AM EDT by backbencher]
Folks:

The website now exists. Nothing on it yet Fixed:

http://www.feinsteinproject.org/

Bob @ Weaponeer.net is working on a .22" LR w/ a brick magwell & trigger pocket, & an oak stock & PG. My Lego order from Pick A Brick @ Lego.com has made it from Poland to Atlanta - now it has to come all the way back across the Atlantic.
Link Posted: 4/27/2013 10:33:40 AM EDT
I'm interested to see it built. I would use a gun sled and a string to shoot it, but it would be neat to build it. Probably stick to a .22LR too. I'd assemble it, and then drill holes straight down the center of the blocks and fill the voids with ABS glue. Then it would be strong enough for a gun.
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 9:58:30 AM EDT
We have a magwell. Pics to follow.
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 11:19:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By backbencher:
We have a magwell. Pics to follow.


Tagged for pics
Link Posted: 5/15/2013 11:42:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/2/2013 1:42:52 PM EDT by backbencher]


It was an AirSoft AR mag converter for the G36 from Evike.com
Link Posted: 5/16/2013 10:59:29 AM EDT
http://www.feinsteinproject.org/loes/effortbloomberg/subeffortg36/subEffortG36.html 56K death. Complete pictorial on how to convert an AirSoft AR mag adapter to a functional AR mag adapter - albeit not necessarily for a G36.
Link Posted: 6/30/2013 12:24:07 PM EDT
We have the beginnings of a stock:



Link Posted: 6/30/2013 1:20:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By backbencher:
Why? B/c not everyone has a mill @ home to build an 80% lower.

B/c 80% lowers are expensive & hard to find.

B/c Legos & epoxy are easy to buy @ Wal-Mart.

B/c it would provide an entree into home gunmaking for thousands who wouldn't otherwise build an AR.

B/c it would provide a starting point for other firearms projects.

Let's flip that question around - WHY should it NOT be done?


"Some people's purpose in life is to serve as a warning to others" unknown author
Link Posted: 6/30/2013 2:44:17 PM EDT
I want this to happen!!! *Subscribe*
Link Posted: 7/1/2013 6:42:41 AM EDT
Shoot me an email on the site. The pic of the email is @ the bottom of the home page.

www.FeinsteinProject.org
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 9:31:46 AM EDT
http://www.feinsteinproject.org/loes/effortthumbhole/effortThumbhole.html

A pictorial of how to build the core of an AR stock out of plastic bricks. The tube is solidly captured, and the core can be used as the basis for building a complete stock around the buffer tube. No warranty, of course. The design is not perfect & not complete.

Link Posted: 7/7/2013 2:47:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/7/2013 10:24:00 AM EDT by backbencher]
Have just received a 80% complete digital jig in .pdf which when printed correctly will be our actual jig. We're on our way. .Pdf will be posted on the website this evening under Loes/ProjectBloomberg.

Version 2 is here, courtesy of the Musician: http://www.feinsteinproject.org/loes/effortbloomberg/MusiciansLowerTemplateVer2.pdf
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 6:07:28 AM EDT
The jig is up!

Version 3
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 7:42:48 AM EDT
For the Californians - a consideration of the cartridge feed issue and why you should wait after gluing your non-thumbhole stocks...

http://www.feinsteinproject.org/loes/effortcalifornia/effortCalifornia.html
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 10:23:07 AM EDT
Don't quit your day job.

Infact, maybe you should seek a second one.
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 1:02:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dopavash1:
Can it be done? Probably.

Should it? Probably not.

The real question you need to ask yourself is Why?. It won't ever be economical or desirable to do, so about the only reason you should do this type of thing is just for novelty purposes. If that's enough for you, then go for it.


I agree, making an AR from "Children's toys" as a raw material is not good publicity or positive perception. You can do anything if you use the right amount of money and know how. Leave it alone before the ATF declares that an Upper and lego's in the same closet = weapon
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 3:20:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 5:00:17 PM EDT
I hate to sound like a nervous nelly (sorry couldn't think of a better phrase), but it does concern me that if someone with less than the regular number of brain cells in the media gets hold of this they will have a field day with it. Someone already made the "ar made with children's toys" comment. We all know that isn't strictly the case and I think the project has merit i just don't see this ending up being a positive thing other than to prove it can be done.
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 5:30:41 PM EDT
well seeing as how the original question is no longer theoretical, im in just to see the end product
Link Posted: 7/8/2013 6:34:19 PM EDT
So I dont think anyone could say that this hasnt got them interested. Now I love legos but wouldnt trust them to hold up to recoil. This past year I took a collision repair class and at one point we worked with a compound like bondo in that you could form it however you wanted but it also had more strength and some properties of metal. I will try to find the name of it. But I was thinking that it would be cool to try to mix some of this stuff up and form it into a lower receiver. if nothing else it would definitely be better than legos. That being said I do still want to see the outcome of the lego ar.
Link Posted: 7/9/2013 6:22:54 AM EDT
So - for the folks that want to see how this turns out - go get some plastic bricks, print the jig, & start building. That's how it's going to turn out - when more than 3 people participate.

For the folks that think that ABS plastic bricks won't stand up to .223" recoil, you might be right, particularly in the long term. In the short run, I think it will hold up, especially glued together. In the long run, if it cracks? You just rebuild it using fresh bricks & ABS cement.

For the doubters that think this will bring bad publicity, I hope to demonstrate for our 3-D printing brethren that no 3-D printer is needed to build an AR, thus no legislation is needed to restrict 3-D printers from printing gun parts. As the cost of 3-D printers falls, I don't see plastic brick lowers as becoming the favorite of home gun makers when you can just print the latest design. But if 3-D printers are restricted, then we will have an alternative.

BATFE has already tried to claim a shoestring as an illegal weapon part. Are they going to start raiding Wal-Mart, carting away the dangerous children's toys?

And if you think I'm crazy - one of my associates is trying to build a .22" LR lower out of toilet paper & glue - and he already has a magwell.
Link Posted: 7/9/2013 7:55:21 AM EDT
Originally Posted By backbencher:
So - for the folks that want to see how this turns out - go get some plastic bricks, print the jig, & start building. That's how it's going to turn out - when more than 3 people participate.

For the folks that think that ABS plastic bricks won't stand up to .223" recoil, you might be right, particularly in the long term. In the short run, I think it will hold up, especially glued together. In the long run, if it cracks? You just rebuild it using fresh bricks & ABS cement.

For the doubters that think this will bring bad publicity, I hope to demonstrate for our 3-D printing brethren that no 3-D printer is needed to build an AR, thus no legislation is needed to restrict 3-D printers from printing gun parts. As the cost of 3-D printers falls, I don't see plastic brick lowers as becoming the favorite of home gun makers when you can just print the latest design. But if 3-D printers are restricted, then we will have an alternative.

BATFE has already tried to claim a shoestring as an illegal weapon part. Are they going to start raiding Wal-Mart, carting away the dangerous children's toys?

And if you think I'm crazy - one of my associates is trying to build a .22" LR lower out of toilet paper & glue - and he already has a magwell.


Link Posted: 7/13/2013 1:12:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/14/2013 3:49:17 PM EDT
I think this is crazy, but if the terrorist can make bombs out f red solo cups and shoe string why can't this be done? This kinda stuff does lead to dumbass people getting their hands on this making life more difficult.
Link Posted: 7/15/2013 1:51:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By WoundedWarrior316:
I think this is crazy, but if the terrorist can make bombs out f red solo cups and shoe string why can't this be done? This kinda stuff does lead to dumbass people getting their hands on this making life more difficult.


It also brings a ton more folks into the AR platform if they can build it themselves. That is what we want, right? More folks shooting the AR?
Link Posted: 7/15/2013 2:15:51 AM EDT
Originally Posted By backbencher:
Originally Posted By WoundedWarrior316:
I think this is crazy, but if the terrorist can make bombs out f red solo cups and shoe string why can't this be done? This kinda stuff does lead to dumbass people getting their hands on this making life more difficult.


It also brings a ton more folks into the AR platform if they can build it themselves. That is what we want, right? More folks shooting the AR?


Of course, but there're other ways of doing so I'm sure...one example would be SAVING your money. If you can't afford a part wait..it's pretty simple really I can understand certain parts made out of plastic..buttons, stocks, sights, trigger guards..If anything invest your idea in mass producing parts that normally cost alot (sights for example) and do those. Just a thought.

Link Posted: 7/15/2013 3:17:02 AM EDT
A tiny amount of acetone will permanently fuse Lego bricks together. It melts the plastic at the joints and they fuse together. This is how they fuse their bricks at Lego Land.

Yeah, I'm a Lego junkie and VIP member.
Link Posted: 7/15/2013 6:15:47 AM EDT
Is acetone going to hold better than ABS cement, or is that what ABS cement is?

Where's the best place to buy bricks @? I bought my first set off Pick-A-Brick, but it would seem that Brick Link has much better prices. Sorting through 6000 bricks on Brick Link is a mite frustrating, though.

Care to join us as a as yet unindicted co-conspirator?
Link Posted: 7/15/2013 6:19:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By WoundedWarrior316:
If anything invest your idea in mass producing parts that normally cost alot (sights for example) and do those. Just a thought.


Are you thinking we can build AR sights out of LEGO or K'Nex? How would we attach them to the rails?
Link Posted: 7/15/2013 6:20:45 AM EDT
acetone melts the brick joint line such that two bricks become one. I would think this would make it stronger than a glue or epoxy joint as a acetone fused brick doesn't have a joint line anymore.
Link Posted: 7/15/2013 8:24:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/15/2013 8:29:17 AM EDT by iroc409]
Originally Posted By backbencher:
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
It's just a remarkably stupid idea. Why would you use hundreds of expensive plastic squares? You like Legos. I get it. My 7 year old son likes them too. However, there are far better materials available.
I think I read about someone using plastic butcher block?
Or use hardwood.
Or anything porous, soaked in fiberglass resin.


No, haven't played w/ Legos for 27+ years. If you've got a better idea on how to create, w/ out many tools, an AR lower, let's hear it. Pine's been tried, & failed, after 3 shots - the bolt jammed in the buffer tube when the weak mount failed. The same chap went on to make a working plastic lower from 3 sheets of plastic he bonded together. However, both experiments were preparations for him milling an 80% aluminum lower - the man has a complete workshop set up, w/ a mill.

Shall we use a cardboard lower, soaked in fiberglass resin? Somehow that seems a bit brittle, but I'm game to try. It would allow us to make it one piece with the stock - which would ease our worries about the buffer tube mounting. What would we do? Build a cardboard mockup of an AR lower & soak it in resin? Never worked w/ fiberglass, so expound for us.


I believe I recall people using stacked cheap nylon cutting boards, and stacked sheet metal. Both of those would probably be easier, and better solutions than Legos. Props for thinking out of the box, though.

ETA: I see this has gained traction. I guess I should pay attention to thread length. Awesome!
Link Posted: 7/15/2013 9:45:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By iroc409:
I believe I recall people using stacked cheap nylon cutting boards, and stacked sheet metal. Both of those would probably be easier, and better solutions than Legos. Props for thinking out of the box, though.

ETA: I see this has gained traction. I guess I should pay attention to thread length. Awesome!


Yep, plastic boards heat glued together has been done - with a mill. We're aiming for a no drill, no mill lower. Come join us.

Link Posted: 8/11/2013 7:40:00 AM EDT
http://www.feinsteinproject.org/loes/effortbloomberg/subefforthardware/subEffortHardware.html

A discussion on how to get all the various sized holes in an AR lower to work with a single sized hole in a standard plastic brick.
Link Posted: 8/11/2013 12:05:27 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By backbencher:


Outstanding idea! Post a link to a 3D printer cheaper than a bunch of Legos & expoy, and I'll buy one.
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Originally Posted By backbencher:
Originally Posted By Taim:
I have a better idea, just go buy a cheap 3d printer. It'll be as structurally sound as the Legos and epoxy... And the cad files can be found for download. If you want to try the Legos for the novelty of it I say go for it... But it's a terrible idea for real use.


Outstanding idea! Post a link to a 3D printer cheaper than a bunch of Legos & expoy, and I'll buy one.


You can get 3d printers starting in the $300 range.
Link Posted: 8/11/2013 12:32:15 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dewme5: You can get 3d printers starting in the $300 range.
View Quote


You'll have to go cheaper. We can build the stock & receiver for less than $300. Used bricks are cheap.
Link Posted: 8/11/2013 1:06:03 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By backbencher:
Why? B/c not everyone has a mill @ home to build an 80% lower.

B/c 80% lowers are expensive & hard to find.

B/c Legos & epoxy are easy to buy @ Wal-Mart.

B/c it would provide an entree into home gunmaking for thousands who wouldn't otherwise build an AR.

B/c it would provide a starting point for other firearms projects.

Let's flip that question around - WHY should it NOT be done?
View Quote


because legos are kid toys, not materials to make firearms maybe?
Link Posted: 8/11/2013 1:38:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Losd: because legos are kid toys, not materials to make firearms maybe?
View Quote


They're ABS plastic. How long have we had plastic lowers? Oh - since 2000, in fact. This has been technically possible since 1963.
Link Posted: 8/11/2013 2:17:21 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By backbencher:


They're ABS plastic. How long have we had plastic lowers? Oh - since 2000, in fact. This has been technically possible since 1963.
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Originally Posted By backbencher:
Originally Posted By Losd: because legos are kid toys, not materials to make firearms maybe?


They're ABS plastic. How long have we had plastic lowers? Oh - since 2000, in fact. This has been technically possible since 1963.


true abs plastic, held together by a bunch of epoxy
Link Posted: 8/11/2013 2:49:00 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Losd: true abs plastic, held together by a bunch of epoxy
View Quote


That is indeed the plan. ABS cement or acetone, w/ epoxy to fill in the gaps where we have to line up the holes for the lugs, trigger, hammer, & safety.

http://www.feinsteinproject.org/loes/effortbloomberg/effortBloomberg.html

Version 3 of the jig is posted there if you'd like to play w/ the idea.
Link Posted: 8/17/2013 3:23:02 AM EDT
Effort Glue is now posted.
Link Posted: 8/28/2013 12:25:57 PM EDT
A very rough, very short stock is complete. Fits mil-spec carbine tubes. Pics tomorrow. Can be made California compatible. A free new buffer tube to the first brave ARFCOMMER who tests it.
Link Posted: 8/30/2013 1:32:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2013 1:42:46 PM EDT by backbencher]
http://www.feinsteinproject.org/loes/effortthumbhole/effortThumbhole.html





More pics tomorrow. Current configuration is for a mil-spec buffer tube, but we have an alternate configuration that should work for commercial carbine tubes. It can also be configured for California "featureless" regulations - which is the configuration shown. Leave off all the crap @ the bottom for a normal stock.
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