Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/17/2005 12:06:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 1:21:36 PM EDT by BUZZARD464]
Followed procedure from previous topics. Heated parts and degreased them, put them (lower receiver apart from upper w/ barrel ) in oven for a preheat. I then took them outside and began. Compressor with a water trap (extra insurance) and regulator set to 35 psi. 8 to 10 inches away from parts when spraying. Lower receiver looks grainy. I ran out of moly while doing the upper half. Oh yes, I used 3 ozs. of product. I should have bought all the colors in gallons with my luck.

I guess now that I get to have the fun time of wiping everything down with acetone.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Just got back from picking up the little woman of the house. This thing is driving me crazy! So, I went back out to the shop and took hold of the lower receiver. I took some towel paper, put a latex glove on the other hand. I began wiping down the lower. The grainy material came off (overspray?).

Further information about what airbrush I am using: Paschee VL Set utilizing the #3 needle. Maybe I should try the #1 needle. It has a more focused pattern. The hose that is in the bottle for the moly goes nearly all the way to the bottom.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 12:40:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BUZZARD464:
Followed procedure from previous topics. Heated parts and degreased them, put them (lower receiver apart from upper w/ barrel ) in oven for a preheat. I then took them outside and began. Compressor with a water trap (extra insurance) and regulator set to 35 psi. 8 to 10 inches away from parts when spraying. Lower receiver looks grainy. I ran out of moly while doing the upper half. Oh yes, I used 3 ozs. of product. I should have bought all the colors in gallons with my luck.

I guess now that I get to have the fun time of wiping everything down with acetone.

Any help is greatly appreciated.



Mine looked a little grainy, too, until I cured it and then put oil on it. Also, how hot did you heat the parts? They simply need to be warm to the touch, not burn-your-hand hot. I just let the rifle set out in the sun for a few minutes before I started... that worked great for me.

One thing to be careful of is how high you have the siphon nozzle on the airbrush. If you have it too high into the air-stream, you'll suck all kinds of extra moly-resin out of the cup and it'll just go into the air. Bring it down until you just have a small pattern and not much overspray. I had the same problem when I was practicing by using water in the cup and spraying some cardboard. I could make it use a TON of liquid if I had the siphon nozzle up too high.

I was able to put 2 coats on my Bushmaster with around 3 ounces of norrell's (filled the 1/2 ounce cup 5 or 6 times), so, IMO, it sounds like you just need to back the nozzle down...

Also, with the airbrush set as I had it, I could hold the nozzle around 4-6 inches from it and never had any runs or thick areas. I didn't waste very much....

Good luck.

Here's my rifle after the basecoat of moly-resin (gray) and some Rustoleum flat black for the pattern.

Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:49:48 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:54:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 3:56:26 PM EDT by Stickman]
Your sprayer is killing you. Cut the pressure, and use a different nozzle. I usually recommend that people spray a piece of cardboard with water. This gives them a realistic idea of how their spray pattern is functioning, and how fast they are spraying the product.

It also sounds like your items were pretty hot when you sprayed. Leave it warm, but you usually don't need it HOT HOT, unless you are doing it for a special reason.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 4:15:44 PM EDT
Kevin, I agree with the previous responses. Cut your pressure to about 20-23psi, finer nozzle, and I'm usually a little closer - 6". I think most of your 3 oz. vaporized before it hit your gun. Heavy coat of oil afterwards, rubbing with an old hand towel will smooth out any of the rough stuff. What temp are you pre-heating at ? This time of year, letting your parts sit in the sun for a few minutes, or between coats would be sufficient. Keep your head up !
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 5:06:33 PM EDT
Moly resin seems to do this when you get the part too hot and/or spray too close. I've found its inevitable that you'll have some rough/grainy spots so I use 000 (super fine) steel wool between coats. I keep this up until I can wipe it down with a patch and not leave lint.

BTW if you decide to use steel wool, you need to degrease afterward (before the next coat) as it leaves behind residue.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 5:19:02 PM EDT
I agree, 3 oz. for what you got covered is way too much.

I would tend to agree with the other posters, sounds like you had the parts too hot at pre-heatand sprayed the material on way too thick. I bought an oven thermometer, and if I crack the door of my oven and turn the temperature all the way down I get 100* which appears to be about perfect for the pre-heat.

You weren't clear in your initial post as to whether or not you did the final bake. If you didn't you can always strip it off.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 5:49:00 PM EDT
I did not bake it. This was just the first coat in the series. What do you all think about cleaning off the rough places and just repainting over what has been already sprayed?

I'm going to preheat with less temperature (the outdoors this time or possibly a hairdryer) and change the needle in the airbrush.

Triggerfin good idea using 000 steelwool. I could then just change out the airbrush to the blower tool with the compressor. We'll see.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 5:53:28 PM EDT
I would strip everything off personally.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 5:31:51 PM EDT
Today I sprayed all the parts with the carb. cleaner due to previous mess. All of the moly was removed by this.

Today I sprayed the lower, buis, and the upper assembly with the flat desert tan moly. I had installed into the Paasche airbrush the #1 needle. I also dropped the regulator on the compressor to 18 psi. I still had "some" sputtering from the airbrush resulting in droplets on the parts. I kept having to wipe the front of the airbrush with a towel to keep the moly from building up. After each part was sprayed they then went for a sit in the hot sunshine.

Tomorrow I hope to finish spraying the flat desert tan on the forearm rail and the buttstock. Then I will be applying the first series of templates and next, a spraying with the OD green and so on. I believe I'm still using too much moly going by what others have posted about how much it takes them. I'm nearly out of the flat tan. I should have just enough to do the buttstock.

My next question is: does anyone use a Paasche airbrush for spraying moly? If so, what needle are you using and what psi do you set the regulator?

At what temp. and for how long should I put the LMT buttstock in the oven?

Any and all input is greatly appreciated.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 6:02:26 PM EDT
I know that I am unimpressed with the ability of Magpul stocks to take even 250 degrees, so I would look at doing the LMT at 200 for 2 hours.



I wish I knew what the issue was with Magpul....
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 10:32:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/22/2005 10:35:48 PM EDT by abri]
I set 50-60 psi on my regulator. If I go lower than that, it caused the paint to blob instead of mist.

Edit: I dont use Paasche, just some no name brand with stamped HVLD on it, but you can try the higher psi. Good luck.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:21:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By abri:
I set 50-60 psi on my regulator. If I go lower than that, it caused the paint to blob instead of mist.

Edit: I dont use Paasche, just some no name brand with stamped HVLD on it, but you can try the higher psi. Good luck.



HVLD or HVLP?

HVLP = High Volume Low Pressure
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 12:33:40 AM EDT
i dont preheat (not neccesary IMHO) 40 psi, 1/2oz. shold coat an entire 20" service barrel, with leftover, then bale at 325-350 degrees for a little over an hour. Ive KG'd more uppers/barrels than i care to remember, and that has always been the process ive used. Anyway just my $.02
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 8:32:28 AM EDT
I hate to say it but I think your fancy airbrush-comp.set up is causing you problems,go to wal-mart and buy a cheap testors airbrush with a can of air ($25).I have never had a problem with mine.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 11:09:31 AM EDT

I hate to say it but I think your fancy airbrush-comp.set up is causing you problems,go to wal-mart and buy a cheap testors airbrush with a can of air ($25).I have never had a problem with mine.


I DISAGREE 100%, get your pressure right and you won't have any problems. The cheap stuff always gave me problems and besides, who wants to keep paying for "air"???
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 11:11:33 AM EDT
Todays results:

I placed the templates on the parts that were sprayed flat tan. Then, I began to spray them with the OD green. I believe I've got it . I have little more than half of an 8 oz. bottle of the OD green left. Regulator was set at roughly 18 psi. I still had to every once and a while wipe out the front of the airbrush. Tomorrow I may place the next set of templates on for the black moly.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 4:09:27 PM EDT
I think I have the same model Paasche airbrush. I bought it about 20 years ogo and never used it. The Norrell's website recommends an external mix airbrush and the Paasche is internal. I'm now wondering if I'll have similar problems. I still need to get a compressor.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 6:46:33 PM EDT
I use a Passche(sp) and have had great results. Hope it all works out for you. gS
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 7:08:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CAR-15:

I hate to say it but I think your fancy airbrush-comp.set up is causing you problems,go to wal-mart and buy a cheap testors airbrush with a can of air ($25).I have never had a problem with mine.


I DISAGREE 100%, get your pressure right and you won't have any problems. The cheap stuff always gave me problems and besides, who wants to keep paying for "air"???



If you finally get things set right I guess you're right but the $4 can of air is cheaper than the $23 norrells.

Glad to hear you got it figured out buzzard
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 8:29:00 AM EDT

I guess you're right but the $4 can of air is cheaper than the $23 norrells.


But how long will a $23.00 bottle of Norrell's last? Longer than one can of air!!
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 8:37:48 AM EDT
I've got the parts sprayed with the black moly. I couldn't wait to see how the block pattern turned out so I removed a piece of the friskette film where the OD green (should) have been. That's right, "should have been". On the underside of the friskette film was the green.

I now have the parts in front of a heater (150 degrees). How long should I take before removing the friskette film?
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 10:23:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CAR-15:

I guess you're right but the $4 can of air is cheaper than the $23 norrells.


But how long will a $23.00 bottle of Norrell's last? Longer than one can of air!!



I'm on bottle #4 of norrells and just popped the cap on the second can of air.


I would wait as long as possible buzzard,looks like you are going to have to bake between colors.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 12:52:02 PM EDT
Tread1, you can't bake inbetween colors with the friskette film on the parts.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 1:46:03 PM EDT
Could you bake the base coat and then put the film on and shoot the second coat?I've never done a camo pattern so I'm not sure.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 3:04:38 PM EDT
One of two things is happening - the film is lifting from spraying, or the moly is running under the template. You'll have to determine which one it is. If the moly is running under, then it is still being applied too heavily, or the moly or surface isn't warm enough. The product should be practically dry on contact. If the film is lifting, make sure you are spraying perpendicular to the template and spray in short bursts. You can also carefully reheat the parts being sprayed, which will help the film stick and form to the surface. Which film product are you using ?...thickness ? I use a Badger film...2 mil vinyl.

Link Posted: 8/24/2005 3:23:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BUZZARD464:
I've got the parts sprayed with the black moly. I couldn't wait to see how the block pattern turned out so I removed a piece of the friskette film where the OD green (should) have been. That's right, "should have been". On the underside of the friskette film was the green.

I now have the parts in front of a heater (150 degrees). How long should I take before removing the friskette film?



Can you take a picture and email it to me or post it here? I need to see a few pictures to get an idea how things are progressing. I also need to know if you have cured anything yet, and if so, how much.


I'm missing a chunk of info here, but it sounds like it was sprayed heavy at first, and when the film was layed down it wasn't smooth enough to block the fine spray from when you got your sprayed set correctly.

At this point I would recommend using a 000 or 0000 steel wool and wiping down everything to smooth it out. This shouldn't take long, but you will need to degrease with carb cleaner afterwards to get all the left behind material off.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 2:22:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/25/2005 2:29:36 AM EDT by abri]

Originally Posted By operatorerror:

Originally Posted By abri:
I set 50-60 psi on my regulator. If I go lower than that, it caused the paint to blob instead of mist.

Edit: I dont use Paasche, just some no name brand with stamped HVLD on it, but you can try the higher psi. Good luck.



HVLD or HVLP?

HVLP = High Volume Low Pressure



You're right, HVLP with 1.0mm tip. It looks similar to this one:

www.gleempaint.com/hvlp1.html

Top Top