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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/1/2004 8:52:13 PM EST
Gonna get to work on my new receivers this weekend. Just wondering if anyone has simply secured the buffer tube nut using a wrench WITHOUT loctite and has never had it come loose.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 12:51:29 AM EST
I've never used loctite on any of my builds yet and have never had a problem. I'd try it without first and if you see a problem, then you can add the loctite if it loosens. If you think you will never remove it again, I guess the loctite would be better. If you are planning to switch between the full stock to folder, then I'd leave it off.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:29:09 AM EST
I don't think it's necessary. Some say loc-tite, some say you need Moly grease.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:34:02 AM EST
don't use it. you don't need to.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:37:43 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:41:28 AM EST
from DigDug

DO NOT USE LOCTITE ON YOUR AR!!!!


May I ask why?
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:41:58 AM EST

Originally Posted By DigDug:
DO NOT USE LOCTITE ON YOUR AR!!!!


What would you recommend to keep my arms #40 from falling off?
Or, did you mean directly on the weapon?
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:42:59 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:43:39 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:46:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By bigkracka:
I don't think it's necessary. Some say loc-tite, some say you need Moly grease.



Minor clarification. Moly grease on the threads on the tube to the receiver not the nut itself. Reason being so that the tube (steel) does not seize with the receiver (aluminium).
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:48:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By DigDug:

Originally Posted By Stryfe:

Originally Posted By DigDug:
DO NOT USE LOCTITE ON YOUR AR!!!!


What would you recommend to keep my arms #40 from falling off?
Or, did you mean directly on the weapon?



Perhaps you should get some in-spec parts?



Actually it is recommened by many, including ARMS who supplies a little tube of Loctite, that the #40 be secured onto your flattop with Loctite.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 5:49:22 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:05:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By DigDug:

Originally Posted By Stryfe:

Originally Posted By DigDug:
DO NOT USE LOCTITE ON YOUR AR!!!!


What would you recommend to keep my arms #40 from falling off?
Or, did you mean directly on the weapon?



Perhaps you should get some in-spec parts?


So, it's just your opinion to not use loc-tite?
Did your previouse owner use red, or blue?
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:09:24 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 6:54:09 AM EST

Originally Posted By DigDug:

Originally Posted By Stryfe:

Originally Posted By DigDug:

Originally Posted By Stryfe:

Originally Posted By DigDug:
DO NOT USE LOCTITE ON YOUR AR!!!!


What would you recommend to keep my arms #40 from falling off?
Or, did you mean directly on the weapon?



Perhaps you should get some in-spec parts?


So, it's just your opinion to not use loc-tite?
Did your previouse owner use red, or blue?



Don't use loctite. That is my opinion from experience. I have seen parts with both blue and red. The red loctite person needs to be bitch slapped. Red loctite is stonger then aluminum. Found that out the hard way.

I have used red loc tite on my float tubes, all you have to do is heat up the area to 300/350 degrees and it comes right off, I have never damaged the finish either
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:07:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By cnorton:

Originally Posted By bigkracka:
I don't think it's necessary. Some say loc-tite, some say you need Moly grease.



Minor clarification. Moly grease on the threads on the tube to the receiver not the nut itself. Reason being so that the tube (steel) does not seize with the receiver (aluminium).



The tube is aluminum, not steel.

Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:57:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2004 3:01:55 PM EST by airbiscuit]
I use BLUE loctite on collapsible stock lock rings and a tad on the tube. Never had a problem. It is recommended. Sure, it doesn't come right off, but it ISN't SUPPOSED TO. No damage. Don't use RED. Consider red a permanent thing, and I agree, anyone using red for this application is a wank. I use blue on my ARMS 40, my LMT BUIS, some scope mounts (NOT torx ring screws), etc. If you want to constantly swap stocks, tubes, etc., then don't use blue loctite. If you intend to shoot your AR and use it, a little blue loctite is highly advisable, and a good thing. By the way, if you don't agree with me, you better drop a line to Tango Down (and every other grip manuf.) and warn them. They have the stuff pre-applied to their grip screws. BTW, those grip screws are steel, and they thread into aluminum. However, remember that with blue, also BUY THE PROPER WRENCHES AND TOOLS. Otherwise, removal will be a metal marring, frustrating experience.
Edit: As ShadowOne said, moderate use of blue loctite. If you use too much, it can be a real b!tch. A drop or two at most.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 9:14:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2004 9:18:04 AM EST by ShadowOne]
Blue loctite isn't permanent if you use it in moderation. I've used it for other things where I've had to remove whatever was screwed on.

And oh, I just used a little Mobil 1 on the buffer tube threads. I'm not worried too much about seizing.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 12:53:23 PM EST
Use moly grease when you put the extension into the receiver.

When you tighten the castle nut, use nothing (or even a little moly).

Their should be a notch (actually, usually 2 or 3 notches, so you at least have access to 1 no matter how the bolt is aligned)) on the side of the nut against the receiver end-plate. Note: this is the side opposite of the 3 openings for the wrench). This provides an area to stake the castle nut in place. Tighten the nut (snug is enough, I think spec calls for 30ft-lb?). Take a hammer and punch and stake a little metal from the end-plate into this notch.

The nut will never turn on it's own, but you can take it off easily enough if you want to. That's the proper way.

rvb


Link Posted: 10/2/2004 3:15:44 PM EST
I dont use any grease when installing the buffer tube, as it is not neccesary and serves no real purpose.

On initial install of a telestock, I dont use loctite on the CAR nut. Some never loosen up. Some do. When I have one that does, I back it off about four turns, apply a SMALL amount of BLUE loctite, then thread back on. Never had a problem and I can always pop them loose with minimal effort. Some poeple just go overboard with the amount and end up gluing the damn things in place. Go sparingly and its good stuff on a car nut... IMHO.

It's the RED loctite to stay away from.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 3:33:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By DigDug:

Originally Posted By cjklekar:
from DigDug

DO NOT USE LOCTITE ON YOUR AR!!!!


May I ask why?



Because if you ever sell the gun, the next owner is gonna be way pissed. I know this from experience. I was the next owner.



Been there, done that...you don't need loctite.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 3:44:00 PM EST
+10 per the loctite comments. A DROP, it spins into the threads. ALWAYS use a proper wrench. I've got several and my favorite is the $7 RRA job. Best $7 you'll spend. I always use a drop of blue loctite. Never had one come loose since (had them loosen before), never doinked a thread or buggered anything either with the proper wrench. If you don't stake, which I don't, I still say use a drop of blue loctite. How do you know if it isn't going to come loose? You may have 500 through it, maybe a 1000. But do you want to be at the range at rd. 1004 when it comes loose? Or worse yet, have it fail when you need it? Blue loctite and a $7 wrench are cheap, harmless insurance.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 7:00:46 AM EST
I work on cars as my 2nd hobby and red threadlocker is used on parts where you don't want to ever take off or high torque applications that do not see frequent removal. I.e. ring gear bolts on a differential

Blue threadlocker is used on parts that you may have to remove in the future, but in the meantime you don't want it to vibrate loose (low to medium torque spec parts) i.e. throttle body bolts

I use blue threadlocker (Loctite is the brand name actually) on some of the rifle parts like the scope ring screws (to prevent it from shaking loose) or the sling studs for Harris bipod mounts.

I'd probably want to use it for the receiver extension tube though.
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