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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 5/3/2004 10:34:53 AM EDT
I am planning on doing a rebarrel on my old upper and need to know if these are the same. I know the moly is sold from bushmaster but does my local hardware or auto shop carry the same thing?
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 12:31:16 PM EDT
I had the same question and after some research concluded that it is not the same thing. Anti-seize compound, if I understand it correctly, is tiny particles of Mo suspended in an oil base. Over time the particles will separate out from the oil and will be nothing more than grit in the threads of the barrel nut. This is not a good thing.

I think that MoS2 lube, sold at most auto shops as hi-temp or disc brake grease, is the right thing to use.

Anyone else?
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 1:03:53 PM EDT
Bought a tube(as in for a grease gun) of Mo-Di under the Exxon brand name at a local auto store for less than $3----Auto Zone I believe it was----but don't quote me on that.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 5:21:52 PM EDT
I went to my garage and low and behold I had previously purchased some synthetic "General Purpose" Molybdenum Disulfide grease from an amsoil order I had placed last year. And all this time my wife thinks when I toss in stuff to my internet orders to save on shipping I waste money, I guess this will show her. It is the standard grease gun sized container, prolly last a loooong time.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 5:34:09 PM EDT
Anti-seize compounds have either aluminum power or copper, and is very thick and gritty. It is either silver gray or copper in color. This is not at all the same as moly grease.
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 3:39:16 AM EDT
Justy - I hope you have better luck than I did in your search. First off "Anti-seize" is kind of a generic term like "Kleenex" There are probably 100 different products out there that use that name but are made of completely different materials.

I went to every Auto Parts and HW store in town looking for a grease that specifically stated it was "Molybdenum Disulfide" and had no luck. I'm sure I saw some that were but if they were, they weren't marked that way. Matter of fact, I noticed most of these products aren't real big on disclosing their make-up.

Anyway I bought Jet Lube 550 which if you notice is marked as a anti-seize but it is Molybdenum Disulfide. $6.62 for a little bottle that is enough for two lifetimes. I had some other things to buy from them anyway which mitigated the shipping cost.

Good luck
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 10:06:24 AM EDT
After reading this thread I called Bushmaster. I asked them if I needed anything special or if I could use what they sell at the autoparts store. They said that you don't kneed anything special the autoparts stuff is fine.

Mike
Link Posted: 5/4/2004 3:33:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MAP:
After reading this thread I called Bushmaster. I asked them if I needed anything special or if I could use what they sell at the autoparts store. They said that you don't kneed anything special the autoparts stuff is fine.

Mike

- No offense but that is useless info. What "autoparts stuff"? Have you ever been to an autoparts store? The sell probably 100 or more different types of lubes, grease etc. Which "stuff" were they referring to? I know I bought a tube of Permatex "Anti Seize" that was not marked with what it was made of. I came home and looked it up on their web site and found out it was made of "highly refined blend of aluminum, copper and graphite lubricants". When I posted that here I was specifically told not to use that or any other product made from any type of metal.

Long story short, Why take chances? It may be a little harder to find, may even cost you an extra couple of bucks but find the right product for the job and then forget about it.
Link Posted: 5/5/2004 5:53:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/5/2004 6:16:21 AM EDT by rimfire50]
No flame intended,Airgunner, but bad analogy. 'Kleenex 'is a registered brand name (Kimberly-Clark Corp.) , not a 'generic' term. Misused a lot, much like 'Coke' is used to describe a soft drink. 'Anti sieze' is a generic term, not brand specific. 'Moly' is a metallic element, is often added to steel while being refined to strengthen the steel. Can also be found in a very fine powder, and is used in that form to 'moly coat' bullets (it is so fine that it impregnates the pores in the copper jackets). Many lubricants contain this moly powder, which acts much the same as the various 'anti sieze' preparations using copper, nickel, etc. As long as the carrier says it contains moly (like the auto store grease) it should be adequate for barrel nut lube. Even if the grease gets hot and cooks out of the threads, the moly stays in place and acts as a lube, hence the 'anti sieze' properties.
Link Posted: 5/5/2004 5:58:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/5/2004 5:59:42 AM EDT by austinwft]
Link Posted: 5/5/2004 1:39:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rimfire50:
No flame intended,Airgunner, but bad analogy. 'Kleenex 'is a registered brand name (Kimberly-Clark Corp.) , not a 'generic' term. Misused a lot, much like 'Coke' is used to describe a soft drink. 'Anti sieze' is a generic term, not brand specific. 'Moly' is a metallic element, is often added to steel while being refined to strengthen the steel. Can also be found in a very fine powder, and is used in that form to 'moly coat' bullets (it is so fine that it impregnates the pores in the copper jackets). Many lubricants contain this moly powder, which acts much the same as the various 'anti sieze' preparations using copper, nickel, etc. As long as the carrier says it contains moly (like the auto store grease) it should be adequate for barrel nut lube. Even if the grease gets hot and cooks out of the threads, the moly stays in place and acts as a lube, hence the 'anti sieze' properties.



Hey Rimfire,

IMO, Kleenex is a generic term. Registered or not. When you have to blow your nose, do you ask for "tissue paper" or do you ask for a Kleenex? When you ask for a Kleenex, do you really give a crap if it's Kleenex brand or not? That is why it is a generic term. But regardless...

My point was simply this, you can't just go down to the autoparts place and get just any old tube of what ever just because it says it's an "Anti-Seize" compound. Depending on its make up, it may do as much harm as good. The problem is most of the greases and lubes there do not list, or in most cases even indicate, what they are made from. Just know what you are buying is all I'm saying.

Sorry you didn't like my analogy
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