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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 3/31/2006 7:49:31 PM EDT
I've always used the slotted style rod ends for patchs, but have heard good things about jags and was going to get a Dewey rod and brass jag. I have a bore guide with lugs that locks into the chamber, but when the jag is in the chamber, how does the patch not fall off of the jag before it goes down the bore? Also, do the ridges of the brass jag stick through the patch at all possibly damaging the bore?

Lastly, what size patches do you use with a jag? Same size as a slot adapter or larger? Is a .22LR patch and a .223 patch going to be the same size?
Link Posted: 4/1/2006 12:19:28 AM EDT
Get a brass jag with the little spear tip on it. You stab the patch and it won't fall off. No, the ridges will not harm the bore, they just help grip the patch.
Link Posted: 4/1/2006 7:51:01 AM EDT
Ah hah! I thought you wrapped the patch around the jag like a taquito, stabbing it makes sense now. Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/1/2006 4:28:25 PM EDT
Make sure you are using correct sized patches as well. If you put an overly large patch on the jag all you do is try to wedge everything in the bore.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 11:47:38 AM EDT
Update since I went to the range yesterday and attempted to use a jag, i'll never use one again.

Going down the bore, it was exceptionally difficult to push down the bore, so much so that the dewey rod was bowing under the force and that was using .22 patches and a bore guide. Also, if I pulled back on the handle so as to not come out of the muzzle, the patch would pull off the end of the jag and be sitting in the bore as I then dragged a brass jag the length of the barrel. The other thing that would happen when attempting to just push out of the muzzle was the brass teeth that weren't covered by the patch would oh so gracefully drag themselves across the muzzle crown on my brand new 24" SS upper.

I'll be sticking to slotted tips from here on out.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 12:38:38 PM EDT
That soft, human powered, brass jag will NOT harm your hardened barrel steel anymore than a bullet with 50,000 psi behind it will.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 1:15:53 PM EDT
If the jag came off when you reversed it is the wrong size jag or patches.
The patch should be tight betwent he jag and bore and stay on.
The brass will also not hurt your bore or crown.
the benchrest method is to run the patch through one time. Why dray all that crud back ito the barrel?
There are even nifty adapters that allow a plastic sode bottle to stay on the muzzle to catch the patches when pushed through.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 8:06:45 PM EDT
Sounds like you may have been using the wrong sized patch, despite what "Size" it was for. It should have some force required, but not as much as you described. You patches were lubed with solvent correct? And you were using an appropriate sized cleaning rod right?

I find this odd as I really hate slotted tips. You end up dragging much of that tip up and down your barrel anyway. And slotted tips are lots of extra work.

Link Posted: 4/3/2006 10:58:07 PM EDT
You need to try again. Nothing will clean better then a nice tight jag and patch. You will NOT harm your barrel even if you have to tap the rod through.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 4:10:58 AM EDT
You are not doing ti right. There are 2 kinds of jags, pierce type and parker hale type. Pierce type are a POS. Parker Hale jags let you wrap the patch around the jag like a burito. It gives you a LOT more contact with the bore and patch and does a better job of cleaning.

Right tools for the right job.

Look at Sinclaire International. They make the best cleaning gear.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 6:37:47 AM EDT
I agree with the others who say your patches are too big. Even if you buy .22 patches or patches designed for .223/5.56 you stand the chance of having to trim down the patch. For me it’s always a trial an error thing with patches till I find the correct amount to trim off.

And I don’t advise dragging the dirty patch back through the clean bore. Let the patch fall off the jag as it exits the barrel.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:48:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 7:56:22 AM EDT by SteelonSteel]
you can adjust the tension a bit too by putting the patch off center on the jag. This will leave the excess off one side so as not to jam it up.

I use Dewey .22 rods in my ar's with a bore guide and the dewey jag with small 1 1/4 inch square usgi patches

I use Dewey .30 cal rods in the m1, m1a, .308 bolt guns, with the dewey jag and usgi large patches (2 1/2 inch square size) cut in half and used off center. On occaision I'll have a jam up but not too often, usually it's operator error.

I like jags so much now, I have them for all my guns, I never use a slotted tip anymore. Rifles get dewey rods/jags, and the pistols get kleenbore rods and jags.

I'd keep trying I think you will like them when you get the hang of it.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 8:23:36 AM EDT
I've never been able to live with that Jag nonsense. I can't warm up to the notion of pushing a sharp object into my weapon.

I like pulling a slotted tip thru my barrel. It's IDIOT PROOF, and you can get a tight patch in there without worrying about bowing the cleaning rod.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 8:45:34 AM EDT
I'll post pics and dimensions of what I was using and see if anyone can give some advise. For my .22cal rifles the slotted tip is steel, for my 8mm it is plastic thankfully, so no worries there. If a jag is a superior system then i'm all for it, but its not working as designed right now. Like I said, the patches were tight enough that I would have to hold the pistol grip and put the rod against my shoulder and push with my upper body to get the patch down the bore, but if I pulled back, it would slip right off the patch. I'll post a pic of the jag also to see for sure what kind it is. It came with the dewey rod which its model number is .22c-36.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 9:10:37 AM EDT
You should never have the difficulties with running a patch through the bore as your experiencing now. You have to understand that patches are made from different materials and different thicknesses. And on that same note, jags are made from different materials and slightly different diameters.

If I change patch brands, that first run through the bore will be an experiment to see whether the patch can remain as is or I need to trim a bit of the excess off. Or what I never thought of before, but is a simple solution, is what another member mentioned above. Poke the jag through the patch off center and let the excess trail behind the jag.

The only time I experience any real resistance running a patch through my weapons bore is when I’m running patches through to dry things out. In that case, with no CLP or bore cleaner to act as a lubricant, I feel more than normal resistance. But nothing that might bend my cleaning rod.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:55:51 AM EDT
These .22-.270 patches are about 1"-1 1/4" square. The jag is about 2-2.5" long, so nothing is going to be trailing behind the jag no matter how off center the patch is stabbed.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:56:53 AM EDT
Sounds like you were pushing two patches through. I use a 22 jag and patches and they're fine unless I try and run a pair or patches thru at the same time. It'll go, but I have to really force the rod thru and it bends like crazy. I don't do it much anymore. IMHO there's not much reason to double up a patch other than to try and get a lot to u're favorite cleaner in there. There are better ways to do that...

Randall
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:59:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LOW2000:
These .22-.270 patches are about 1"-1 1/4" square. The jag is about 2-2.5" long, so nothing is going to be trailing behind the jag no matter how off center the patch is stabbed.



Your making this harder than it really is. By trailing I don’t mean literally an inch or more of patch trailing behind the jag. If your patches are 1”x1.25” hack off the .25” and try centering the patch on the jag and giving that a try.

I really don’t know what else to say.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 3:49:04 PM EDT

the benchrest method is to run the patch through one time. Why dray all that crud back ito the barrel?There are even nifty adapters that allow a plastic sode bottle to stay on the muzzle to catch the patches when pushed through.


Not trying to jack your thread but I just wanted to ask a question (probably a noob question so bear with me).

I have been reading up on cleaning the bore/barrel.

Is it safe to say pushing the brushes, patches, jags through in the direction of the bullet only one time is the common method of cleaning. If so, when you get to the muzzle do you push all the way through and then take the patch off the jag and pull the empty jag back through, put another patch on a repeat? Do you do this with the brushes as well (push through only - take it off and pull empty rod back to chamber)?

I have cleaned guns before but I am not a "by the book" cleaner or anything so when I get my 24 SS HBAR I want to maybe do things a little more maticulate.

Thanks for the help
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:47:58 PM EDT
Well everyone has their own methods but these are mine:

I push the jag and patch all the way through the barrel. I let the patch fall off the jag then pull the whole thing back through the barrel.

Bore brushes go all the way through exiting the muzzle then get pulled back through.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:46:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By QUIB:
Well everyone has their own methods but these are mine:

I push the jag and patch all the way through the barrel. I let the patch fall off the jag then pull the whole thing back through the barrel.

Bore brushes go all the way through exiting the muzzle then get pulled back through.



Oh! the humanity!!!!
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 2:35:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2006 2:36:28 AM EDT by QUIB]

Originally Posted By Ch0wd3r:

Originally Posted By QUIB:
Well everyone has their own methods but these are mine:

I push the jag and patch all the way through the barrel. I let the patch fall off the jag then pull the whole thing back through the barrel.

Bore brushes go all the way through exiting the muzzle then get pulled back through.



Oh! the humanity!!!!




Like I said:

Originally Posted By QUIB:
Well everyone has their own methods but these are mine:





Now bring it on bore NAZI's!!!
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 1:29:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By QUIB:
Well everyone has their own methods but these are mine:

I push the jag and patch all the way through the barrel. I let the patch fall off the jag then pull the whole thing back through the barrel.

Bore brushes go all the way through exiting the muzzle then get pulled back through.



+1

LOW 2000- If you really want to clean your bore, the loop will not get you there. It's amazing how much stuff you get out with a good jag. However, patch size get's crucial! It will not only depend on the caliber, but also the patch material. I bought some cotton ones cheap from Sportsman's Guide and I don't think I can even trim them down enough to get them to swab through!

If you really want to cut down on the pressure it takes (although it probably won't clean as well), try buying some synthetic patches as Wal-mart. They are the ones that feel slick, not rough like shirt material. They push through the bore very easy! I switched from them because I didn't feel they were cleaning as well.

Gundraw
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 1:33:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/9/2006 1:35:41 PM EDT by NorthernBornRebel]
Go over to his house, sit on his porch, smoke all his blunts, drink a 40 that he bought, get a glass of Kool-Aid and then leave.

Oh, wait, you said jag I thought you said j_g......oops, my bad
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