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Posted: 1/10/2005 11:13:37 PM EDT
I just received 2000 rounds of XM193PD from ammoman. I sorted out one of the boxes, inspected the rounds, and loaded the rounds to stripper clips. In the first box, 482 rounds are perfectly normal. 2 Rounds have damaged necks. Finally, 26 rounds have bullets setback to varying degrees. Some bullets have the crimp minorly inset, whereas other rounds have crimp completely inset. How much of the crimp should be showing for a bullet to be considered safe?
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 3:13:10 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 7:20:17 AM EDT
Troy, thanks for the info. I guess my terminology was not accurate in the original post. By “crimp”, I guess I meant, “cannelure”, or crimp marks in the bullet jacket. When you said,

If the cannelure on the bullet is visible…
did you mean that the entire canelure should be visible, or just part of it should be visible? For example, if half of the cannelure is hidden, but half is still exposed, would that bullet be safe? Thanks for the help!
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:21:35 AM EDT
You don't want none of the cannelure to be visible. You don't want all of it to be visible. The case should be crimped into the cannelure. Not past it, not before it.

In reality it is ok if none of the cannelure is showing as long as the case neck is infact crimped into it. It can be hard to see though if you don't know what you are looking for so just go by the rules stated above.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 9:22:33 AM EDT
I would NOT use the cannalure as a guide at all. Bullet cannalure position can vary. Anyone who has used WIN's 55gr FMJWC for reloading can verify this.

Measure the Overall Length. If you don't have calipers, then a known "good" round will give you a basic comparison. If you can see any variation in overall length, I would disassemble the cartridge. M193 is too high pressure of a round to be chancing things.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 12:35:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Midian:
Troy, thanks for the info. I guess my terminology was not accurate in the original post. By “crimp”, I guess I meant, “cannelure”, or crimp marks in the bullet jacket. When you said,

If the cannelure on the bullet is visible…
did you mean that the entire canelure should be visible, or just part of it should be visible? For example, if half of the cannelure is hidden, but half is still exposed, would that bullet be safe? Thanks for the help!



Point is you want to see the cannelure. Otherwise it is or can be setback too far in the case. when dealing with 60,000 + psi donn't fool around. If you know someone who reloads, knowledgable not a Bubba, then they can help you out. Otherwise set the rounds aside and store them for a day when they can be corrected. They are not junk; you can fix them if you have the knowledge. (it's not that hard.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 2:56:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 4:52:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2005 5:13:01 AM EDT by back40]
The cannelure is the part that has the vertical "stripes" to hold the bullet in, so to speak?

So in other words, you should be able to see at least the tops of the veritical stripes in the copper jacket?
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:05:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By back40:
The canalure is the part that has the vertical "stripes" to hold the bullet in, so to speak?

So in other words, you should be able to see at least the tops of the veritical stripes in the copper jacket?


Yes

Do not attempt to shoot any cartridge that you can't see at least the top of the cannelure.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 4:38:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wingman26:
Yes

Do not attempt to shoot any cartridge that you can't see at least the top of the cannelure.



WRONG!

I'LL TRY SAYING THIS LOUDER..

OVERALL LENGTH IS WHAT IS CRITICAL. I HAVE ASSEMBLED M193 BULLETS IN PROPER LENGTHED BRASS IN WHICH YOU COULD NOT SEE ANY OF THE CANNALURE.

CANNALURE POSITION ON THE BULLET CAN VARY. THE ONLY TRUE MEASURE OF BULLET POSITION IS OVERALL LENGTH.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 6:22:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2005 6:22:22 AM EDT by metroplex]
What are the tolerances for OAL on M193 and M855?

All I've seen so far is one exact spec for OAL for each caliber. The Ammo Oracle makes my PC crash at work.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 8:58:50 AM EDT
M193 is 52,000PSI max average pressure.
M855 is 55,000PSI max average pressure.

M197 "proof-load" is 70,000PSI. A good AR15 will stand up to firing one of these without any cracks in the bolt, chamber, or anywhere for that matter, confirmed by magnetic particle testing.

If the round is crimped into the cannelure you will be ok. They vary in placement a little. Even a speck past the cannelure is not going to raise pressures enough to blow up your 5.56mm chambered rifle. The problem is once it's past the cannelure very little stoping it from being FURTHER setback when fed.

Using this ammunition in a .223 chamber is not advisable as you are already @ 60-65k PSI on every shot with normal, pristine M193.
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