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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/12/2004 6:50:00 PM EST
I figured this was a good time to ask this question, with the ban about to be dead and me about to have a bushy M4gery with a 14.5 barrel and a permanently installed Phantom.

I guess I never really thought about it, but now that I have, I'm curious.

I'm sure lots of you guys know. A little help please?
Link Posted: 9/13/2004 6:58:57 PM EST
So, they're magic?

OK.
Link Posted: 9/13/2004 7:15:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/13/2004 7:17:22 PM EST by DsrtEgl50]
Ask Google

First Link quoted below.



Flash suppressors work by allowing the propellant gases to cool before dissipating. It is commonly thought that they are used on military rifles to reduce visibility to the enemy, but the size of a device necessary to hide the muzzle flash from an enemy during the night would be prohibitive. Flash suppressors are designed to hide the muzzle flash from the shooter to preserve his or her night vision, usually by directing the incandescent gasses downward, away from the line of sight of the shooter. Military forces engaging in night combat are still quite visible, and must move quickly after firing to avoid return fire.

Muzzle flash can also be controlled by using cartridges with a faster-burning powder, so that the propellant gases will already have begun to cool by the time they exit the barrel. Faster-burning powder, however, produces less projectile velocity, which reduces both the accuracy and lethality of the weapon.



Edited 'cause it copied popup text in the middle.

Jonathan
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