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Posted: 9/18/2004 8:05:47 PM EST

Can anyone tell me jsut exactly how clean you need to clean the bore of your AR? Is it supposed to be spotless? Because I swear - I CLP patched/dry patched/CLP... etc. my bore today until it was clean, but there still appears to be a spot or two in the rifling when I peer down the barrel. ARRGH!
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 7:28:35 AM EST
First thing I would do is to get a better bore cleaner. CLP is NOT a good bore cleaner. It does nothing for copper removal. Butch's Bore Shine, Montana Extreme, Shooters Choice, are but just a few of the better bore cleaners out there.
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 1:46:59 PM EST
I run one CLP soaked patch through the bore a couple of times, then follow with a dry patch. Your bore/chamber is chrome lined isn't it?

Hold off on the copper remover until accuracy starts to drop off.
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 4:48:23 PM EST

Originally Posted By gregw45:
I run one CLP soaked patch through the bore a couple of times, then follow with a dry patch. Your bore/chamber is chrome lined isn't it?

Hold off on the copper remover until accuracy starts to drop off.



No, not chrome-lined. Actually a match barrel.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 4:50:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:

Originally Posted By gregw45:
I run one CLP soaked patch through the bore a couple of times, then follow with a dry patch. Your bore/chamber is chrome lined isn't it?

Hold off on the copper remover until accuracy starts to drop off.



No, not chrome-lined. Actually a match barrel.





Then it is imperative that you use a better cleaner than just CLP. Cleaning your match barrel with just CLP is like running the cheapest gas you can find through your Indy race car.

You also do not want to just let the copper build up until accuracy falls off. It will just be that much harder and longer to get it clean again. Along with accuracy degradation, you can also see pressures go up with the build up of copper over time.


Get a good bore cleaner and follow the label directions.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 2:03:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:
No, not chrome-lined. Actually a match barrel.



Roger that. rebel_rifle is on the money.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 4:15:23 AM EST
not to sound like a dumbass would it be bad to plug one end of the barrel and fill the barrel with solvent and just sit in there for a day or so and just let the shit fall out?
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 5:20:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By JimmyThompson:
not to sound like a dumbass would it be bad to plug one end of the barrel and fill the barrel with solvent and just sit in there for a day or so and just let the shit fall out?




What about the gas port?

You will only get so much solvent in there up to the gas port hole and besides all that, what a mess.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 7:14:00 AM EST

Thanks guys. I think I'll swab some Hoppes through it then.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 11:21:39 AM EST
There's a 24" stainless steel 1 piece cleaning rod at the local shop for $18. Is there a significant advantage to the coated rods? such as graphite coated or dewey rods?

And is a brass jag better than a plastic jag or a patch holder? If so, why?

I just have a plastic guide that came in a cheap Hoppe's kit to put on the muzzle of the gun, any problem with simply using that instead of an expensive $18 bore guide?

So does this sound good for cleaning:

Run patches through with hoppes #9 until it comes out clean. Run dry patches through a couple times, and then run one through that's lightly coated in oil.

Use a brush to clean out the receiver, coat internal parts and all external metal with CLP.

Any problems with that?
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 1:04:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By Opesus:
There's a 24" stainless steel 1 piece cleaning rod at the local shop for $18. Is there a significant advantage to the coated rods? such as graphite coated or dewey rods?



I personally think so. Some may disagree, but one thing for sure, the one piece rod is the only way to go.



And is a brass jag better than a plastic jag or a patch holder? If so, why?



Yes, by far. Brass will not flex or wear out as fast as the plastic one. Some solvents may ruin the plastic one and the plastic ones are bad to strip out.




I just have a plastic guide that came in a cheap Hoppe's kit to put on the muzzle of the gun, any problem with simply using that instead of an expensive $18 bore guide?



You just said the operative word, "cheap." You get what you pay for. What did you pay for the rifle? I bet it wasn't "cheap." The better bore guides are made specifically for the AR and will last a long, long time. They also seal the chamber and keep out solvents out of the trigger well and gumming up the trigger. They are money well spent.


So does this sound good for cleaning:

Run patches through with hoppes #9 until it comes out clean. Run dry patches through a couple times, and then run one through that's lightly coated in oil.




Sounds okay. Just make sure before you fire the rifle then next time that you remove all of the oil from the bore.


Use a brush to clean out the receiver, coat internal parts and all external metal with CLP.



Sounds okay, but you really don't need much if any CLP on the outside of the receivers. Since they are aluminum, they will not rust.

Link Posted: 9/21/2004 1:08:24 PM EST
Can you point me in the way of a good bore guide?

And I paid $550 for the rifle. =)
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 1:35:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 1:39:54 PM EST by wildearp]

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:
Can anyone tell me jsut exactly how clean you need to clean the bore of your AR? Is it supposed to be spotless? Because I swear - I CLP patched/dry patched/CLP... etc. my bore today until it was clean, but there still appears to be a spot or two in the rifling when I peer down the barrel. ARRGH!



Shoot. Punch the bore once or twice. Rack it. Remove, re-oil the bolt bearing surfaces. Shoot. repeat.

You only need it white-glove clean to turn it in to the armorer after issue in the service.

A match barrel should be extremely easy to clean. I highly recommend MPRO-7. That is what I use on my high accuracy tube. It gets more crap out of the barrel than copper solvent. If it is truly a match barrel, the Dewey rod will protect it. Clean from the breech. No guide is really necessary unless you just want to get one.

.......and one of those spots is probably the hole for your gas tube. It won't clean out, no matter how much you try!
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 3:03:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By Opesus:
Can you point me in the way of a good bore guide?

And I paid $550 for the rifle. =)




www.sinclairintl.com

www.midwayusa.com

www.georgiaprecision.com



Contrary what others may say, a bore guide is a very inexpensive and wise investment. It centers the cleaning rod in the bore so as to clean better and not ding the muzzle and it keeps solvenst from entering the trigger well and crudding it up.

I mean, what's up with not spending another $15 to $20 to properly clean a rifle you just paid in excess of $500 for?

Sounds like cheap insurance to me. If costs are really that important to some, then don't fool with guns all they do is cost you money.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 3:20:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 3:26:51 PM EST by Opesus]
Somewhere you gotta draw a line in the sand.

That logic can be applied to:

"what's up with buying a $500+ gun and not having plenty of good mags for it?"
"...and not having a super nice case"
"...and not having really good ammo"
"...and not having a really good sling"
"... and the list goes on"

=)

I guess I don't see the importance, as I don't use nearly enough solvent. I have never had solvent drip back on any of my guns.

<edit>
Anything wrong with something like this?
http://www.midwayusa.com/rewriteaproduct/425524
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 3:40:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By Opesus:
Somewhere you gotta draw a line in the sand.

That logic can be applied to:

"what's up with buying a $500+ gun and not having plenty of good mags for it?"
"...and not having a super nice case"
"...and not having really good ammo"
"...and not having a really good sling"
"... and the list goes on"

=)

I guess I don't see the importance, as I don't use nearly enough solvent. I have never had solvent drip back on any of my guns.

<edit>
Anything wrong with something like this?
http://www.midwayusa.com/rewriteaproduct/425524




You do NOT want that type of muzzle guide. Cleaning the rifle from the muzzle is not wise. It is very easy to damage the muzzle crown which will result in poor accuracy. Get a *bore* guide.


Look, bottome line is this. If you don't want to buy any of this stuff then don't. All I am doing is relating my personal experiences in what may protect your investment and be of benefit to you. My advice is worth exactly what you paid for it, nothing.


I don't recall anyone saying you had to buy a "super nice case", "really good ammo" , "really good sling" or any other stuff. It just makes sense to me that after spending that amount of money you would want to keep your rifle clean and be able to clean it without as much fuss or possibly damaging it. No one said fooling around with guns is cheap, if they did they don't know what they are talking about.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 4:36:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:
...



Sorry, didn't mean to make it sound like that. Just trying to get an idea for this.

Thanks for the advice.

-Matt
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 7:38:07 AM EST
Not only do the bore guides do an excellent job of protecting your barrel, they also speed up the cleaning time quite a bit, as you're not trying to center the rod each pass and not damage the chamber.
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 7:33:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:
Can anyone tell me jsut exactly how clean you need to clean the bore of your AR? Is it supposed to be spotless? Because I swear - I CLP patched/dry patched/CLP... etc. my bore today until it was clean, but there still appears to be a spot or two in the rifling when I peer down the barrel. ARRGH!



Okay, you've wet your bore with patches, passed a brush through enough times to remove fouling, wet swabbed your bore a few more times, and then used dry patches until they're not coming out dirty.
Inspect the bore when dry. If it looks clean and you're happy, then you're done. Swab it once with a patch wet with your favorite lubricant/preservative and you're done cleaning the bore.

If the spots are always in the same place, I wonder if they're just part of your barrels' steel, like a birthmark? Is it the hole from the gas tube you're viewing? I don't know. I hope it's not worth losing sleep.

Sincerely,
Craig
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