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Posted: 3/7/2010 9:16:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/7/2010 9:40:23 AM EDT by rome5982]
According to the ammunition review on heavy OTMs, the comparison between the Hornady 223 75 grain Match and the 223 75 grain TAP (T1) was almost identical for the accuracy and the velocity.  In fact, the Match load had slightly higher average velocities.  However, the cost comparison betwen the two (Wholesale Hunter) shows that the 75 grain Match is $16 while the TAP is $19.  I would suspect the terminal performance would also be similar since the bullet construction and the velocities are the same.  What then am I missing since the prices are so different?  Why should I purchase the TAP over the Match product?

edited to correctly reflect the ammo review info regarding the TAP T1 type bullet rather than the T2.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 9:21:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/7/2010 9:23:48 AM EDT by Molon]
Originally Posted By rome5982:
According to the ammunition review on heavy OTMs, the comparison between the Hornady 223 75 grain Match and the 5.56 75 grain TAP (red box) was almost identical for the accuracy and the velocity.


Totally false.




Catalog of Hornady 75 Grain Loads

Here is a little “visual catalog” of the 5 different loads that Hornady produces using a 75 grain bullet.  I thought it might help clear up some of the confusion pertaining to the various loads offered by Hornady.







75 grain BTHP MATCH:  catalog #8026
223 Remington




This load uses the 75 grain BTHP “T1” bullet without a cannelure.  (The is the same bullet that is available as a reloading component.)  The case neck does have a very slight taper crimp.  The powder used is a short cut extruded type.  The lots of this load that I have chronographed have had velocities similar to or slightly higher than the velocities of the 75 grain TAP FPD load (depending on the barrel.)




75 grain BTHP TAP Precision:  catalog #80265
223 Remington

The original version of this load was referred to as "TAP Precision" while the more recent version has dropped the "Precision" nomenclature.  Both versions come in a red box, but the newer version uses the same style of label on the box that the 5.56 TAP ammunition uses, adding to the confusion.

original  
current


This load is the forerunner to the TAP FPD load.  This load uses the T1 bullet with a cannelure and has a firm taper crimp on the case neck.  This load also uses extruded powder and has a velocity similar to 75 grain TAP FPD.  The primers are not crimped and the cases are plain brass.  


original





current






75 grain TAP FPD (For Personal Defense):  catalog #80268
223 Remington



I think this is the load that started a lot of the confusion about the various 75 grain loads offered by Hornday.  First off, the ammo comes in a black box.  The box is still labeled as “TAP”, but it also has the “For Personal Defense” title on it.  Besides the black box, this round also has the “black nickel” coated cases giving the round its distinctive appearance.  

Other than the black box and black case the round is basically the same as the 75 grain BTHP TAP Precision load.  It uses the T1 bullet with a cannelure and crimped case neck as well as the extruded powder.  It does not have crimped primers.  The muzzle velocity of this load runs around 2640 fps from a 20” chrome lined, NATO chambered Colt barrel.





TAP 5.56 X 45
75 grain BTHP/WC T2:
 catalog #8126N



This is the NATO pressure load.  It comes in a red TAP box, but the side panel is clearly labeled 5.56 X 45.  The panel has a disclaimer that reads “NOT FOR USE IN 223 CHAMBERS.”  I think this load is confused with the 75 grain BTHP TAP Precision load because they both come packaged in the red TAP box.

One of the biggest features of this round besides being loaded to NATO pressures is the new T2 bullet.  The ogive of the T2 bullet is shorter than the T1 bullet and the T2 bullet has a longer bearing surface than the T1 bullet.  The T2 bullets also have incredibly uniform meplats giving the loaded round a more uniform overall length.  It is reported that the shape of the bullet was designed so as to improve feeding in the M4 platform.









     

The T2 bullet has a cannelure and the case neck has a firm taper crimp.  The primers for this load are  crimped in place and the primer itself is reported to be a “mil-spec” primer.  The more recent lots of this load have sealed primers.  Contrary to advertisements, none of the lots of this load that I have seen have a sealed case mouth.  This load uses ball powder and has a muzzle velocity of around 2820 fps from a 20” chrome lined, NATO chambered barrel.























I’d like to dispel the rumor that the TAP 5.56 X 45 load uses a large rifle primer.  This is completely false and can be proved with the application of a tiny bit of science.  The nominal diameter for small rifle primers is 0.175 inches.*  De-priming a fired TAP 5.56 X 45 case and measuring the spent primer with digital calipers shows the primer has a diameter of 0.174”.









75 grain Practice:  catalog #9760
223 Remington








This load comes in a white, 50 round box.  The distinctive feature about this round is the Berdan primed steel case that it uses.  This load uses the T1 bullet with a cannelure and taper crimp.  The load is charged with ball powder and has velocities similar to the 75 grain TAP FPD load.










*The ABC’s of Reloading, page 45.

Link Posted: 3/7/2010 9:37:01 AM EDT
OK, thanks for the clarification on the "red box" TAP ammo.  I will edit my question to pertain to the T1 TAP bullet rather than T2.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 10:09:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rome5982:

edited to correctly reflect the ammo review info regarding the TAP T1 type bullet rather than the T2.


The lack of cannelure on the match ammo is the only thing that might mean its less effective.  Molon might have some gel test info on the different loadings of the ammo.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 11:29:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 11:40:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zhukov:
I don't have any data to support it, but I believe that the cannelure isn't strictly necessary due to the long bullet length and thin jacket.


That's my understanding as well.  I've asked in a couple different threads if anyone has gel test results comparing cannelured v. non-cannelured rounds, but there doesn't seem to be such a direct comparison out there.  However, Molon posted the results of DocGKR's gel tests of the Prvi 75gr round (no cannelure), and the results were very similar to the 75gr TAP round as far as neck length, penetration, and fragmentation.  Based on that, I'd agree that it's the thin jacket and the length of the round that are the keys to fragmentation.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 7:15:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By rome5982:
According to the ammunition review on heavy OTMs, the comparison between the Hornady 223 75 grain Match and the 223 75 grain TAP (T1) was almost identical for the accuracy and the velocity.  In fact, the Match load had slightly higher average velocities.  However, the cost comparison betwen the two (Wholesale Hunter) shows that the 75 grain Match is $16 while the TAP is $19.  I would suspect the terminal performance would also be similar since the bullet construction and the velocities are the same.  What then am I missing since the prices are so different?  Why should I purchase the TAP over the Match product?

edited to correctly reflect the ammo review info regarding the TAP T1 type bullet rather than the T2.


this?




Link Posted: 3/8/2010 5:29:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By danpass:
Originally Posted By rome5982:
According to the ammunition review on heavy OTMs, the comparison between the Hornady 223 75 grain Match and the 223 75 grain TAP (T1) was almost identical for the accuracy and the velocity.  In fact, the Match load had slightly higher average velocities.  However, the cost comparison betwen the two (Wholesale Hunter) shows that the 75 grain Match is $16 while the TAP is $19.  I would suspect the terminal performance would also be similar since the bullet construction and the velocities are the same.  What then am I missing since the prices are so different?  Why should I purchase the TAP over the Match product?

edited to correctly reflect the ammo review info regarding the TAP T1 type bullet rather than the T2.


this?


http://www.box.net/shared/static/7tk29n0nh9.jpg

http://www.box.net/shared/static/8ecpfq3lz3.jpg


Yes

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