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Posted: 5/1/2015 7:40:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2015 3:25:07 PM EDT by eracer]
I've always joined right in with the crowd when it comes to: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" with regards to ejection patterns

My Grendel ejects, loads, fires, and ejects just fine (AS LONG AS THE BOLT HAS PLENTY OF LUBE,) except the the cases only go about three feet to the side, and they're spinning like like Linda Blair's head on meth when they leave the ejection port.

A week ago, when I put a new hand guard on, I noticed that I had installed the gas block slightly askew, and the ejection was REALLY feeble. The cases were basically dribbling out of the port. Today I loosened the hex screws and aligned the block as best I could, and took the gun out, and ejection was better, but certainly nowhere near 'spirited.' And there's that weird 'spinning like a pulsar' thing going on.

Any ideas?

Should I not worry?

Should I try a different buffer?

Is there a way to tell if the gas block is properly aligned? Maybe I should use some loctite around the gas port?
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 10:57:43 PM EDT
What buffer are you using now. Have you checked for any gas leaks around block or gas key on bcg?
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 12:02:15 AM EDT
Heavier buffer and/or heavier buffer spring are probably the easiest things to try to tone down the effects of high gas pressure.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:02:55 AM EDT
I was having the same issue with an older CMMG. I ran an H3 buffer AND Springco Red spring. Now I do that to all guns I buy. I just ran 500 rounds of everything under the sun in my Colt 6920 and PSA CHF midlength. It ejected all ammo forcefully at 4 oclock which is perfect for me. My CMMG drove me crazy when it ejected brass at 1 oclock. I feel like gun makers that overgas their guns from the factory are lazy and they just want to make sure it will run everything. Any overgassed gun will beat itself up more.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 7:07:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2015 7:07:13 AM EDT by VA-gunnut]
Topic Moved
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 4:11:01 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ElvisTCB:
What buffer are you using now. Have you checked for any gas leaks around block or gas key on bcg?
View Quote

Not sure how to check for leaks. I don't see any excess carbon around the block. I suppose I could swap out the carrier.

It's a mid-length gas system (~9" from the gas port to the receiver) and a rifle buffer. There are no markings on the buffer at all, but it's definitely longer than an H buffer.

It looks like the bottom one. I swapped the original stock for the rifle stock (I was told it wouldn't be a problem.)



Link Posted: 5/2/2015 4:13:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2015 4:14:20 PM EDT by eracer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dennis2313:
Heavier buffer and/or heavier buffer spring are probably the easiest things to try to tone down the effects of high gas pressure.
View Quote

Check my original again. I think I confused people with the talk about the 5.56 gun ejecting at 1:00. I've since deleted that part...

This one is a Grendel, and it ejects at 3:00, and the brass only goes about 3 feet. Seems like the rearward travel of the bolt is not firm enough to eject the cases with any authority.
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 12:50:33 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 7:15:27 AM EDT
Thanks Dano,

The bolt has been held back on the last round every time.

I will do what you suggested.

How precise does the alignment of the gas block need to be? The block is flush with the flange on the barrel, and to the naked eye, the rail on the block is perfectly aligned with the rail on the receiver. Is there a way to verify that the ports on the block and the barrel are aligned correctly?

Or would the bolt locking back be evidence of sufficient gas pressure, as you suggested?
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 8:17:08 AM EDT
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