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Posted: 4/17/2017 3:41:35 PM EDT
I am having a hard time getting the buffer tube off an older AR with rifle stock/rifle tube.

Yes I know about heating it up, haven't tried that yet as last time it was hard even after heating it up.

Is there a vise block I  can buy that would properly mount and protect the lower so I can turn the wrench and apply some force without risking damage to the lower ? Mostly all i find is upper vises and the mag block vise which would not protect the lower from possibly from being twisted
Link Posted: 4/17/2017 6:03:13 PM EDT
[#1]
Vise block for magwell, if I didn't have one I'd use pmag for $10 if ya smash it owell, I've flexed some lowers in the past and never had a issue, not saying I'd use a 8ft cheater though
Link Posted: 4/17/2017 6:21:08 PM EDT
[#2]
I have this one, it has steel reinforcement to prevent flexing 
Link Posted: 4/17/2017 9:32:21 PM EDT
[#3]
Clamp your receiver directly in the vise using these. > Link.

Clamp the flat area of the receiver above the grip and trigger as close as you can to the work being done, you will have to remove the grip and safety first though.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:19:04 PM EDT
[#4]
Geissele Reaction Block is one way of taking the stress off the mag well portion of the lower.  A couple of places had them on sale recently.  Another option that is less costly than the Geissele option is this block that allows you to clamp the receiver extension in a vise.  

http://www.762sass.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=59_84&product_id=246
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 1:35:07 PM EDT
[#5]
I've put some serious torque on lowers while they were in a vise block and never had an issue. Get one and you'll be fine, OP. Lower receivers are stronger than most give them credit for.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 4:23:23 PM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
Is there a vise block I  can buy that would properly mount and protect the lower so I can turn the wrench and apply some force without risking damage to the lower ?
View Quote
A couple pieces of 1x4 or 1x2 or similar piece of wood works perfectly for this application. And if you're a man's man you probably already have some scrap pieces laying around. If not you can pick up a board for about a buck fitty at the store. Clamp down nice and close to where the extension screws into the receiver and torque away.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 6:27:01 PM EDT
[#7]
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Quoted:
A couple pieces of 1x4 or 1x2 or similar piece of wood works perfectly for this application. And if you're a man's man you probably already have some scrap pieces laying around. If not you can pick up a board for about a buck fitty at the store. Clamp down nice and close to where the extension screws into the receiver and torque away.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Is there a vise block I  can buy that would properly mount and protect the lower so I can turn the wrench and apply some force without risking damage to the lower ?
A couple pieces of 1x4 or 1x2 or similar piece of wood works perfectly for this application. And if you're a man's man you probably already have some scrap pieces laying around. If not you can pick up a board for about a buck fitty at the store. Clamp down nice and close to where the extension screws into the receiver and torque away.
Great suggestion. If you don't have the Geissele block or a standard lower block, two pieces of scrap wood will fill in nicely. Remove the stock and sandwich the tube between the two blocks in the vise. If you're worried about stressing the lower with a vise block, this method should alleviate that concern.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:23:20 PM EDT
[#8]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Geissele Reaction Block is one way of taking the stress off the mag well portion of the lower.  A couple of places had them on sale recently.  Another option that is less costly than the Geissele option is this block that allows you to clamp the receiver extension in a vise.  

http://www.762sass.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=59_84&product_id=246
View Quote
How is a Geissele reaction Block or those delrin blocks you linked to going to work on a rifle tube?

OP, you can remove the grip and safety, then clamp the back half of the lower in a vice if you have soft jaws for your vice.  An old belt would work as well.  They may have used Loctite on it.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:18:53 PM EDT
[#9]
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Quoted:


How is a Geissele reaction Block or those delrin blocks you linked to going to work on a rifle tube?

OP, you can remove the grip and safety, then clamp the back half of the lower in a vice if you have soft jaws for your vice.  An old belt would work as well.  They may have used Loctite on it.
View Quote
I wouldn't clamp the receiver itself into the vise, with, or without, soft jaws. There's a reason they make vise blocks. Like I said before, use a vise block and don't worry about flexing the lower. I've put a lot of torque on some and they were just fine. Also, unlike the castle nut on a carbine tube, the nut on the end of a rifle tube only allows you to get it so tight. I'd try applying some heat to see if it helps just in case loctite was used.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:45:47 PM EDT
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I wouldn't clamp the receiver itself into the vise, with, or without, soft jaws. There's a reason they make vise blocks. Like I said before, use a vise block and don't worry about flexing the lower. I've put a lot of torque on some and they were just fine. Also, unlike the castle nut on a carbine tube, the nut on the end of a rifle tube only allows you to get it so tight. I'd try applying some heat to see if it helps just in case loctite was used.
View Quote
Clamping the lower directly in the Vise (with protective vise jaw caps) is the correct tech manual approved method for installing and removing receiver extensions.

Installing and removing receiver extensions with a magwell vise block is more likely to cause damage.

The reason that they make magwell vise blocks is to act as a third hand while installing triggers.

Torque spec for rifle receiver extension is 35-39 FOOT POUNDS with grease.

Torque spec for carbine castle nut is 38-42 FOOT POUNDS with grease.

Dealing with the torque specs listed above is asking for trouble if only using a magwell vise block for support.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 7:24:15 AM EDT
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Clamping the lower directly in the Vise (with protective vise jaw caps) is the correct tech manual approved method for installing and removing receiver extensions.

Installing and removing receiver extensions with a magwell vise block is more likely to cause damage.

The reason that they make magwell vise blocks is to act as a third hand while installing triggers.

Torque spec for rifle receiver extension is 35-39 FOOT POUNDS with grease.

Torque spec for carbine castle nut is 38-42 FOOT POUNDS with grease.

Dealing with the torque specs listed above is asking for trouble if only using a magwell vise block for support.
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Quoted:
Quoted:


I wouldn't clamp the receiver itself into the vise, with, or without, soft jaws. There's a reason they make vise blocks. Like I said before, use a vise block and don't worry about flexing the lower. I've put a lot of torque on some and they were just fine. Also, unlike the castle nut on a carbine tube, the nut on the end of a rifle tube only allows you to get it so tight. I'd try applying some heat to see if it helps just in case loctite was used.
Clamping the lower directly in the Vise (with protective vise jaw caps) is the correct tech manual approved method for installing and removing receiver extensions.

Installing and removing receiver extensions with a magwell vise block is more likely to cause damage.

The reason that they make magwell vise blocks is to act as a third hand while installing triggers.

Torque spec for rifle receiver extension is 35-39 FOOT POUNDS with grease.

Torque spec for carbine castle nut is 38-42 FOOT POUNDS with grease.

Dealing with the torque specs listed above is asking for trouble if only using a magwell vise block for support.
I don't care what the manual says. I, along with every other armorer I know uses either a vise block or something like the Geissele block to torque castle nuts. I've never seen ANYONE clamp a lower receiver directly between the vise jaws, with, or without, soft jaws. This includes several armorers courses, by the way. I'm not sure if you realize this, but 38 foot pounds of torque is not very much and WILL NOT deform or harm the lower when using a vise block.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 8:28:40 AM EDT
[#12]
get a torch and heat it from inside the buffer tube or just behind the buffer tower.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 10:04:45 AM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I don't care what the manual says. I, along with every other armorer I know uses either a vise block or something like the Geissele block to torque castle nuts. I've never seen ANYONE clamp a lower receiver directly between the vise jaws, with, or without, soft jaws. This includes several armorers courses, by the way. I'm not sure if you realize this, but 38 foot pounds of torque is not very much and WILL NOT deform or harm the lower when using a vise block.
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38-42 FOOT POUNDS of installation torque can become a lot more upon removal and I have seen lowers become warped when using a magwell vise block, so I will continue to follow the manual which doesn't lead to these issues, YMMV I guess.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 10:25:42 AM EDT
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


38-42 FOOT POUNDS of installation torque can become a lot more upon removal and I have seen lowers become warped when using a magwell vise block, so I will continue to follow the manual which doesn't lead to these issues, YMMV I guess.
View Quote
Agree with Cliff on high removal torque...  especially if the castle nut is staked.  The Geissele reaction block is expensive, but I have to admit, it is really handy to hold a lower receiver and for more than just receiver extension work.  This really facilitated removal of a staked castle nut (like Tig said - allows you to put some "ass" into it).  Friend loaned me his and now I'm saving up my pennies to buy one eventually.
Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 11:08:41 AM EDT
[#15]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Agree with Cliff on high removal torque...  especially if the castle nut is staked.  The Geissele reaction block is expensive, but I have to admit, it is really handy to hold a lower receiver and for more than just receiver extension work.  This really facilitated removal of a staked castle nut (like Tig said - allows you to put some "ass" into it).  Friend loaned me his and now I'm saving up my pennies to buy one eventually.
https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/415329/Geissele-reaction-block-190694.JPG
View Quote
The Geissele buffer tube holder does not work on rifle extensions.

I have one of the Geissele blocks and I really like it for installing standard receiver tubes.  Makes it easy to get them straight and put some torque on the castle but.

Botach makes one very similar to the Geissele for half the cost.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 12:53:34 PM EDT
[#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


38-42 FOOT POUNDS of installation torque can become a lot more upon removal and I have seen lowers become warped when using a magwell vise block, so I will continue to follow the manual which doesn't lead to these issues, YMMV I guess.
View Quote
I guess so. I've removed some very tight and we'll staked castle nuts using a vise block and have never had a lower crack or bend. It's working just fine for me.
Link Posted: 4/21/2017 2:01:58 PM EDT
[#17]
A vise with jaw protectors to clamp the lower.
If it was installed with Loctite in place of assembly lube then you will need 500 DEGF to soften the Loctite.
Link Posted: 4/21/2017 2:09:25 PM EDT
[#18]
I'm guessing you didn't put the lower in a vise so far?

In that case: use the butt vise.

Seriously, put the lower on a cushion on a chair, sit on the lower.  Use the wrench.
I've tightened all my buffer tubes this and none have come loose.

I don't know how many ft-lbs this method will tolerate (I guess it depends on your ass), but you can get a castle nut pretty snug with it.

Also, like the poster above said loc-tite could make this more difficult if it was used.

My other suggestion is to try some kroil on the threads and let it sit overnight.
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