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Posted: 6/15/2009 6:50:55 PM EST
I'm looking at a 2.5-10x32mm for a 6.8 Recce rifle. The version with Mil Dot reticle and Zero Stop runs around $300 higher than the version without Zero Stop. Planned usage includes mostly range and some hunting. What would make the zero stop worth the extra coin?
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:48:03 AM EST
The zero stop, as you know, allows you to return to a reference point (zero - or no elevation) without having to read the dial. You simply crank the elevation knob clockwise until it stops.

If you will be using the elevation knob to compensate for elevation, and then have to quickly return to zero (no elevation compensation), it can be a worthwhile option.

I opted for zero stop on my NF but at the time (few years ago) it was only a 100-150 option. Is it the factory quoting the zero stop feature as a $300 option??? That is a chunk of change and if it is $300, I would probably pass for the needs you have stated.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 11:50:36 AM EST

I have zero stop on some of my NSXs . It only usefull if you are twisting your elevation for your come ups. For example, you will need over 30MOA come up to reach out to 1000 on many cartridges. It since the standard MOA dial of the NSX will give you 10MOA on the revolution, you would have to spin the knob over 3 times.

Where the trouble is is when you go back to your zero. Its real easy to dial one full turn off. The zero stop is nice since I just blindly turn until it doesn't turn anymore.

This is why the Schmidt Bender PMIIs with the single turn/ double turn, or the US Optics EREK knobs are far superior than the Leupold M1 / M3 knobs .

The reality is for your 6.8 I doubt you will by dialing up and down constantly. This is expecially true for hunting situations

I would suggest the NP-R2 recticle over the Mil Dot ( Mil may be more tacticool however ). I seldom use my mid dot scopes to range. I always use my NP-R1 type recticles for holdovers. It is far quicker to remember the holdover values for the NP-R2 for the 6.8SPC and just hold over for hunting, than it is twisting knobes in the excitement of a hunt. The NP-R2 and R1s have much finer has marks than a Mil dot will, making it more usefull for holdovers

I would save your $ on the Zero stop and spend it on the Nightforce Unimount.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 12:41:35 PM EST
Originally Posted By trg42:

I have zero stop on some of my NSXs . It only usefull if you are twisting your elevation for your come ups. For example, you will need over 30MOA come up to reach out to 1000 on many cartridges. It since the standard MOA dial of the NSX will give you 10MOA on the revolution, you would have to spin the knob over 3 times.

Where the trouble is is when you go back to your zero. Its real easy to dial one full turn off. The zero stop is nice since I just blindly turn until it doesn't turn anymore.

This is why the Schmidt Bender PMIIs with the single turn/ double turn, or the US Optics EREK knobs are far superior than the Leupold M1 / M3 knobs .

The reality is for your 6.8 I doubt you will by dialing up and down constantly. This is expecially true for hunting situations

I would suggest the NP-R2 recticle over the Mil Dot ( Mil may be more tacticool however ). I seldom use my mid dot scopes to range. I always use my NP-R1 type recticles for holdovers. It is far quicker to remember the holdover values for the NP-R2 for the 6.8SPC and just hold over for hunting, than it is twisting knobes in the excitement of a hunt. The NP-R2 and R1s have much finer has marks than a Mil dot will, making it more usefull for holdovers

I would save your $ on the Zero stop and spend it on the Nightforce Unimount.


I more or less agree with all of this. Odds are you're not going to be out there twisting on the knobs all the time.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 5:26:33 PM EST
Originally Posted By BrianNH:
The zero stop, as you know, allows you to return to a reference point (zero - or no elevation) without having to read the dial. You simply crank the elevation knob clockwise until it stops.

If you will be using the elevation knob to compensate for elevation, and then have to quickly return to zero (no elevation compensation), it can be a worthwhile option.

I opted for zero stop on my NF but at the time (few years ago) it was only a 100-150 option. Is it the factory quoting the zero stop feature as a $300 option??? That is a chunk of change and if it is $300, I would probably pass for the needs you have stated.


Just noticed that I was comparing a 24mm to a 32mm so my math is off.

Reading some of the replies, I get the sense that a zero stop is nice to have, but not a "must have" for my intended use. Maybe I should be asking if the 32mm scope is worth the extra coin over the 24mm?
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