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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 7/19/2008 8:20:13 AM EST
I am shooting reloads consisting of 55 gr FMJ and CCI #41 Arsenal primers. I pull the trigger and no “boom” – only a dent in the primer. I can fire factory ammo such as Monarch or Winchester with no problems. Do I have a weak hammer spring? Or do I have some other problem (i.e. firing pin etc.)

The weapon is composed of a 16” Delton complete kit paired with a DPMS lower. I do not have a second weapon to test fire this ammo…

I would appreciate any help available…
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 8:34:28 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 8:39:30 AM EST
Are you sure you are getting the CCI primers fully seated?

CCI primers are a little larger than Winchester and Federal and seat a little harder.

Just something to check before swapping hammer springs to something stiffer.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 12:04:42 AM EST
Not to insult your intelligence, but is the hammer spring installed correctly. It's somewhat common to find them upside-down.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 6:17:06 AM EST
Try shooting some mil-surp. If it does it with that then I would say the hammer spring is probably alittle weak.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:32:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 9:15:56 AM EST by flhtc79086]
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Originally Posted By Eric:
Not to insult your intelligence, but is the hammer spring installed correctly. It's somewhat common to find them upside-down.


Not insulting on your part - but that is not the problem (I did check to make sure though) One never knows... Thanks
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:38:07 AM EST
MYBE BAD PRIMERS.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:38:48 AM EST
How big is the dent? Do they fire on a second strike?

Also, you might want to post this in the reloading sub-forum. Those guys will know more about specific primer types.

It's at the bottom of the Armory forum
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:39:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 9:01:49 AM EST by flhtc79086]
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Originally Posted By mrraley:
I do not have much experience with reloads, but I do know that there are different types of primers that can be bought. Some primers are harder that others.

You might want to check that as a start



You are correct about the primer hardness - these are very hard primers - they are made so to prevent slam fires on floating firing pins and that is why I want to use them... I might load a batch using different primers, but I might be just as well off ($$$) just to buy an extra power spring. Who knows - it is just frustrating when things do not go my way - Thanks
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:42:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 9:02:36 AM EST by flhtc79086]
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Originally Posted By rippersde50:
How big is the dent?

Do they fire on a second strike?

Also, you might want to post this in the reloading sub-forum. Those guys will know more about specific primer types.

It's at the bottom of the Armory forum




It makes a large dent - larger than the usual "slamming the bolt home" dent. And yes they will fire on the second try...
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 8:45:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 9:06:35 AM EST by flhtc79086]
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Originally Posted By zeroman:
MYBE BAD PRIMERS.


That thought has cross my mind - it could be a bad batch of primers - but is cheaper to buy another hammer spring than to buy another batch of primers... I hate it when things do not work out...
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 9:00:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By flhtc79086:
That thought has cross my mind - it could be a bad batch of primers - but is cheaper to buy another hammer spring than to buy another batch of primers... I hate it when things do not work out...



Would replacing the hammer spring with a stronger one increase the risk of a pierced primer ? Or it that be a pressure or broken firing pin problem?
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 9:10:30 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 9:13:05 AM EST by flhtc79086]
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Originally Posted By JedYonkers:
Would replacing the hammer spring with a stronger one increase the risk of a pierced primer ? Or it that be a pressure or broken firing pin problem?


You are correct - and a pierced primer would not be good. So, should I just start over with a new firing pin? And then move on to a stronger hammer spring if the firing pin does not work... Or switch to a different primer before all of the above...
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 9:23:36 AM EST
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Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
Are you sure you are getting the CCI primers fully seated?

CCI primers are a little larger than Winchester and Federal and seat a little harder.

Just something to check before swapping hammer springs to something stiffer.


The primers are well seated. I seat them by hand and not on a press, so I get that "feel" thing going on. If they were not seated properly, they would blow out when ignition took place.

That is a good point for those that reload - one needs to check for proper primer seating and overall cartridge length...
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:13:26 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 4:41:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By JedYonkers:

Originally Posted By flhtc79086:
That thought has cross my mind - it could be a bad batch of primers - but is cheaper to buy another hammer spring than to buy another batch of primers... I hate it when things do not work out...



Would replacing the hammer spring with a stronger one increase the risk of a pierced primer ? Or it that be a pressure or broken firing pin problem?


NO! The firing pin is limited in how far it will move, increasing the energy will only make it faster.

Modern bolt rifles have a lot more energy in the striker.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 4:37:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 4:38:55 AM EST by wicked_chicken]
The problem could also be how you handle the primers when reloading. Skin has natural oils in it that deactivate primers, and as such, handling them directly can result in primers going bad.

I know when I reload they go from the box to the tray to the casing. No skin contact at all. Just a thought.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:08:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By wicked_chicken:
The problem could also be how you handle the primers when reloading. Skin has natural oils in it that deactivate primers, and as such, handling them directly can result in primers going bad.

I know when I reload they go from the box to the tray to the casing. No skin contact at all. Just a thought.


I am a very experienced reloader and can attest that this is not the problem in this case - but thanks for the reply anyway...
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