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Posted: 5/13/2018 9:15:28 AM EDT
I currently have a Smith and Wesson MNP sport 2 to 3 with a Bushnell red dot scope and a very basic mounting system. I have now purchased a 300 blackout upper and had ordered a primary arms 1 x 6 x 24 300 blackout scope but now need a mount. The 223 has flip up sights but I don’t use them, I use the Bushnell red dot. The 300 does not have flip ups. My plan was to leave the red dot on the 223 and mount the primary arms scope on the 300 and have the scopes zeroed in for each upper. However, after searching for a mount, I found the qd mounts and it made me wonder if I would be better off using the QD with the primary arms scope and moving it back and forth from the 223 and 300 but I’m not sure if this will work as each gun will shoot differently. In fact, I don’t understand the value of a QD. If it is only for taking off and cleaning my gun, that’s not valuable to me.

Looking at the aero fixed mount or a larue QD.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 10:41:21 AM EDT
You'll spend more time/money on ammo re-zeroing your optic by switching back and forth vs buying another PA red dot for your other upper.

I personally would rather have a standard (non-qd) mount, because once I mount it and get it zeroed, I want it to stay zeroed.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 10:48:53 AM EDT
I like QD mounts for taking the optic off and using the backups in an emergency. They are also nice for NV mounts and swapping between different types of optics for different types of shooting.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 11:11:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/13/2018 11:11:52 AM EDT by TxRed]
I use a LaRue and Burris Pepr qd mounts on my 2 ar's that share scopes and think it's very worthwhile to have qd mounts. I use a high power scope to test my reloads and then re-mount hunting powered optic.

For me, it only takes a few rounds, 5 or so, to fine tune my pepr mount. I like qd mounts also because I can easily take off the mount and go to irons in case optics fail in whatever scenario comes to mind.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 11:23:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/13/2018 11:23:48 AM EDT by ryandushku]
You'll be just fine with a STD mount. I'm can remove my STD mount in under 30 seconds with my pocket knife, it's not like it's welded on. Unless you're actually using it in a law enforcement or military application I think you'll be fine.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 11:55:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/13/2018 11:58:25 AM EDT by Marine6680]
The primary purpose of a QD mount is to make the optic easy to remove in an emergency situation.

Meaning, you are in a fire fight and the optic has bit the dust and is completely unusable. 30 seconds is forever in a real fire fight. A QD mount can be removed in 5 seconds.

Otherwise they are just cool to have.

Usually the price difference isn't too drastic between the two types. The PEPR mount is like $20 more for QD, and around $50 more for other brands like American Defense, Larue, and Midwest And. But those brands do run between $175-200 for QD.

The PEPR mount is a good lower cost one piece scope mount. It's definitely not as refined as the other, but it works. SWFA and Primary Arms offer their own standard mounts that are reasonable, even cheaper than the PEPR, but I feel a little better in quality. Well the SWFA is in my opinion, I do not have direct experience with the PA mount.

When you order the scope, PA offers mounts at a discount if you add the mount as an option before you add the scope to your cart.

Personally I don't swap optics around. I tend to put one on and it stays. Unless I upgrade the optic for some reason. Then I will remove and maybe shuffle optics around a bit.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 1:30:28 PM EDT
Very helpful thank you. I am going to order a standard mount and do what I was originally planning. Looking st the primary arms mount for $60 but is heavy vs aero precision. I’ve not yet determined which aero is the right on for me as the specs are limited, at least on optics planet.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 7:16:41 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rdfish1:
Very helpful thank you. I am going to order a standard mount and do what I was originally planning. Looking st the primary arms mount for $60 but is heavy vs aero precision. I’ve not yet determined which aero is the right on for me as the specs are limited, at least on optics planet.
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That lightweight aero precision mount... While very lightweight is also not as robust as others.

I have heard more than once of them breaking.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 8:51:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/13/2018 9:27:02 PM EDT by Knife_Sniper]
A quality QD will allow you to zero, pop off the optic, and place the optic back on the rifle and keep your zero within a 1/2 minute.

A mount such as the aero or warne with torx or bolts will require a torque wrench to ensure you keep your zero. Tighten one bolt more than the other, and likely your zero will shift.

For your purposes of wanting to switch an optic back and forth between rifles... Consider this: a QD mount such as Larue may need the mounting hardware itself adjusted between different rifles.

Upper A the lever may be nice and tight, on upper B the lever may be too loose. So not only will you need to re-zero, you may need to adjust your mounts. Not good.

A mount which can be torqued such as the warne will allow you to tighten on either receiver each bolt to the appropriate in lbs.

So switching back and forth between rifles in different calibers is also possible. Zero your optic on your primary, set the turrets, and then when you switch keep a log of the adjustments you need to make to zero rifle 2.

This would be useful for load development and accuracy testing. Just be meticulous.
Link Posted: 5/14/2018 3:01:18 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Knife_Sniper:
A quality QD will allow you to zero, pop off the optic, and place the optic back on the rifle and keep your zero within a 1/2 minute.

A mount such as the aero or warne with torx or bolts will require a torque wrench to ensure you keep your zero. Tighten one bolt more than the other, and likely your zero will shift.

For your purposes of wanting to switch an optic back and forth between rifles... Consider this: a QD mount such as Larue may need the mounting hardware itself adjusted between different rifles.

Upper A the lever may be nice and tight, on upper B the lever may be too loose. So not only will you need to re-zero, you may need to adjust your mounts. Not good.

A mount which can be torqued such as the warne will allow you to tighten on either receiver each bolt to the appropriate in lbs.

So switching back and forth between rifles in different calibers is also possible. Zero your optic on your primary, set the turrets, and then when you switch keep a log of the adjustments you need to make to zero rifle 2.

This would be useful for load development and accuracy testing. Just be meticulous.
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Very enlightening. Appreciate the time you took to respond. Very helpful.
Link Posted: 5/16/2018 8:29:21 PM EDT
With a red dot I run standard mounts with absolute cowitness. If it fails i can still flip irons and be fine. With magnified optics i prefer a QD so in case of emergency i can yank it and go to irons quick.
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 2:19:41 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Al303:
With a red dot I run standard mounts with absolute cowitness. If it fails i can still flip irons and be fine. With magnified optics i prefer a QD so in case of emergency i can yank it and go to irons quick.
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And if your RDS gets the glass shattered? Or you fall and get the front and rear lens covered in mud? Or you grab your rifle after sleeping in below freezing weather and find a layer or frost over the rear lens? If these or other things happen and you need your rifle in the next ten seconds or people die... it will not be OK.
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 2:29:54 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DevL:
And if your RDS gets the glass shattered? Or you fall and get the front and rear lens covered in mud? Or you grab your rifle after sleeping in below freezing weather and find a layer or frost over the rear lens? If these or other things happen and you need your rifle in the next ten seconds or people die... it will not be OK.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DevL:
Originally Posted By Al303:
With a red dot I run standard mounts with absolute cowitness. If it fails i can still flip irons and be fine. With magnified optics i prefer a QD so in case of emergency i can yank it and go to irons quick.
And if your RDS gets the glass shattered? Or you fall and get the front and rear lens covered in mud? Or you grab your rifle after sleeping in below freezing weather and find a layer or frost over the rear lens? If these or other things happen and you need your rifle in the next ten seconds or people die... it will not be OK.
At least he's more prepared than the ones who proudly go from thread to thread and profess with edginess how they don't.
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 1:52:49 PM EDT
QD mounts are a must for me, but I pair an optic to a rifle permanently. This way I never have to rezero when swapping back and forth between guns.

I prefer QD because:
-Can remove due to malfunction and use irons
-Can use other optics (switch between red Dot and a scope)
-I prefer to tighten down with a QD instead of a screw/Allen key on a non QD mouny... I won't worry about the mount coming loose.
-QD mounts don't cost that much. I use QRP2 for my 30mm dots ($45 used buy lnib) and ADM on anything else.
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