Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 8/29/2015 8:21:34 AM EDT
I haven't bought a BCG in a few years, and have decided to work on a couple of new builds. I own a few spares, but they're all standard production BCGs which are (panic buys) from 2008.

Is there a substantial difference between nitrided and NiB, and if so what is it?
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 9:55:43 AM EDT
Nickel boron is a slightly slicker surface.  It is also more expensive to apply.  Neither one of them holds oil like parkerizing does.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 1:51:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/29/2015 1:52:10 PM EDT by rzrsedge]
Nitride/QPQ/Melonite/Whatever the brand calls it, is a metal hardening and corrosion resistance treatment to the base metal, NiB is a coating on top of the base metal.
 
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 2:19:05 PM EDT
I own both types and from here on out will be going with Nitride.
It cleans up easier and doesn't show the ugly stains and off color that NiB will eventually have.

If you want to see a work of art in Nitride check out JP Enterprise's carriers.
AIM has very good pricing on their Nitride BCG's and I have had no problems with mine..
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 2:25:36 PM EDT
NiB has been known to flake, even on some of the nicer brands. Not always, but it happens

Nitride can't flake, just wear down

I use a nitride paired with a fortis hammer, slicker than an ovulating woman at a chipndales show, feels oiled even when it's dry
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 2:31:09 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Krashdog:
NiB has been known to flake, even on some of the nicer brands. Not always, but it happens

Nitride can't flake, just wear down

I use a nitride paired with a fortis hammer, slicker than an ovulating woman at a chipndales show, feels oiled even when it's dry
View Quote


That's some colorful language there.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 4:32:09 PM EDT
So....NiB not worth the added expense over park'd, or is it?
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 4:47:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NCFLAR15:
So....NiB not worth the added expense over park'd, or is it?
View Quote


One way of putting it. A Facebook gun group metaphor

"For sale, smith and Wesson m&p multi cal, upgraded blackhawk stock and grip. NiB bcg, bad lever, and 20 rounds wolf gold $1500 firm"


Link Posted: 8/29/2015 4:48:08 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NCFLAR15:
So....NiB not worth the added expense over park'd, or is it?
View Quote

Not to me. I had a couple, and 1 was high quality (I believe it was made by a member here) but it just wasn't for me. I didn't notice any improvement over park'd other than wiping down a little easier.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 7:32:12 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NCFLAR15:
So....NiB not worth the added expense over park'd, or is it?
View Quote


Not NiB over park, not to me (especially when you can get excellent ToolCraft park'd bcg's for so little).  
But I have to admit I've been impressed w/AIM's $99 V2 Nitride bcg (Bryan at AIM has stated their Nitride bcg's get the fewest warranty calls).
I'm currently running a reliability test on a new V2, it was initially cleaned/lubed then used for 750rds when more lube was added, currently at 1,300rds and still 100%, going for 1,500rds before I finally clean it.
Tomac
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 8:41:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tomac:


Not NiB over park, not to me (especially when you can get excellent ToolCraft park'd bcg's for so little).  
But I have to admit I've been impressed w/AIM's $99 V2 Nitride bcg (Bryan at AIM has stated their Nitride bcg's get the fewest warranty calls).
I'm currently running a reliability test on a new V2, it was initially cleaned/lubed then used for 750rds when more lube was added, currently at 1,300rds and still 100%, going for 1,500rds before I finally clean it.
Tomac
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tomac:
Originally Posted By NCFLAR15:
So....NiB not worth the added expense over park'd, or is it?


Not NiB over park, not to me (especially when you can get excellent ToolCraft park'd bcg's for so little).  
But I have to admit I've been impressed w/AIM's $99 V2 Nitride bcg (Bryan at AIM has stated their Nitride bcg's get the fewest warranty calls).
I'm currently running a reliability test on a new V2, it was initially cleaned/lubed then used for 750rds when more lube was added, currently at 1,300rds and still 100%, going for 1,500rds before I finally clean it.
Tomac


I just hit 1000rds today on my Toolcraft NiB BCG and only oiled it once at 450rds after the initial oiling.  I did not clean it with any type of cleaner when it was new, only wiped down and oiled..  I pull it out on occasion to inspect and not one issue so far.  I took some pictures at 500rds and today at 1000rds.  I will be cleaning it and comparing the color/ finish to a never used Toolcraft NiB BCG soon at around 1500-1800rds.  

I have one of the non NiB coated Toolcraft BCG's as well and it's been 100% reliable as well but I only have around 400rds on it.  I have cleaned and oiled this one a couple of times.  I like how easily the NiB coated ones wipe down but honestly they both seem to perform the same for me.  If you like the shiny look and ease of wiping clean, maybe the NiB coating is for you.  If you're going to scrub it clean every time you clean it and don't care about it being shiny at the range, maybe the non NiB coated is for you and it will be cheaper.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 9:53:15 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By QtrHorse:


I just hit 1000rds today on my Toolcraft NiB BCG and only oiled it once at 450rds after the initial oiling.  I did not clean it with any type of cleaner when it was new, only wiped down and oiled..  I pull it out on occasion to inspect and not one issue so far.  I took some pictures at 500rds and today at 1000rds.  I will be cleaning it and comparing the color/ finish to a never used Toolcraft NiB BCG soon at around 1500-1800rds.  

I have one of the non NiB coated Toolcraft BCG's as well and it's been 100% reliable as well but I only have around 400rds on it.  I have cleaned and oiled this one a couple of times.  I like how easily the NiB coated ones wipe down but honestly they both seem to perform the same for me.  If you like the shiny look and ease of wiping clean, maybe the NiB coating is for you.  If you're going to scrub it clean every time you clean it and don't care about it being shiny at the range, maybe the non NiB coated is for you and it will be cheaper.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By QtrHorse:
Originally Posted By Tomac:
Originally Posted By NCFLAR15:
So....NiB not worth the added expense over park'd, or is it?


Not NiB over park, not to me (especially when you can get excellent ToolCraft park'd bcg's for so little).  
But I have to admit I've been impressed w/AIM's $99 V2 Nitride bcg (Bryan at AIM has stated their Nitride bcg's get the fewest warranty calls).
I'm currently running a reliability test on a new V2, it was initially cleaned/lubed then used for 750rds when more lube was added, currently at 1,300rds and still 100%, going for 1,500rds before I finally clean it.
Tomac


I just hit 1000rds today on my Toolcraft NiB BCG and only oiled it once at 450rds after the initial oiling.  I did not clean it with any type of cleaner when it was new, only wiped down and oiled..  I pull it out on occasion to inspect and not one issue so far.  I took some pictures at 500rds and today at 1000rds.  I will be cleaning it and comparing the color/ finish to a never used Toolcraft NiB BCG soon at around 1500-1800rds.  

I have one of the non NiB coated Toolcraft BCG's as well and it's been 100% reliable as well but I only have around 400rds on it.  I have cleaned and oiled this one a couple of times.  I like how easily the NiB coated ones wipe down but honestly they both seem to perform the same for me.  If you like the shiny look and ease of wiping clean, maybe the NiB coating is for you.  If you're going to scrub it clean every time you clean it and don't care about it being shiny at the range, maybe the non NiB coated is for you and it will be cheaper.

I just checked out their website, nice looking parts.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 10:08:59 PM EDT
I bought my Toolcraft BCG's from WCarmory, they have the best price that I know of.  The AIM BCG's are also very reasonably priced.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 10:31:48 PM EDT
I see no reason to part from the tried and proven recipe for a reliable BCG -- parkerized shot peened HPT/MPI C158 bolt with tool steel extractor, 8620 carrier, chrome lined inside and parkerized outside, staked grade 8 fasteners on the gas key.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 11:10:17 PM EDT
I have 1 fail zero NIB.  It works, I would never do it again.  The expense is not worth it.  The nitrided AIM bcg's I have seen are pretty nice.  My buddy has started using them and they are working great for him.  There is no real extra cost with them.  Every other BCG I own is a standard mispec type chrome lined bcg.  They are all performing great and clean up easy.  I choose to clean after shooting most of the time.  In this instance they clean quick and easy.  



My personal opinion is not to pay extra for coatings or treatments.  With the advent of nitriding bcgs I will surely never buy another NIB.  
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 11:15:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/29/2015 11:23:53 PM EDT by MS556]
NiB is a nickel-boron plsting.  It has the best lubricity (slipperiness) or lowest coefficient of friction.  It is, in effect, a very good dry lubricant.  That is how it is and has been used in industry for a long time.  It is a plating over the undercut base metal.  It is no more or less likely to crack or peel than hard chrome on the typical rifle bore.  It can be run on rotating and sliding surfaces for prolonged periods of time.  It is harder than 4150 CMV steel, but not as hard as nitride.

Nitride, or QPQ SN is a heated chemical or gas process for surface hardening of the steel, itself, at the molecular level.  It is not a plating.  It leaves the dimensions of the treated product unaltered.  While it is harder than nickel-boron, it does not have the same lubricity.  It is not as slippery, but is better than parakerized steel.  It cannot peel.  It does require great skill  because the temperature required is close to that which would cause the steel to lose its temper.  It is extremely resistant to corrosion and is harder than hard chrome.

I have  WMD NiB-X nickel boron BCG and a nitride barrel on the same rifle as a nitride barrel.  I have matched the metallurgy to the task.  Barrels need hardness to extend tbeir useful round count life and need corrosion resistence.  Nitride does that, protecting the barrel inside and out with extreme hardness and corrosion protection without disturbing the exact contours of the lands a d grooves of the rifling.

A BCG has different characteristics.  It needs to be super slippery and benefits fron self lubrication capabities.  Except when being fired, it is usually protected by a closed door.  Lubrticity is more important than hardness.  Nickel boron is ideal for this.  The part that needs hardness is the firing pin, which typically is still hard chrome plated.  It is best to add a little lube to a NiB BCG, but it can be run dry for a long time.  It wipes clean easily.

Match the metallurgy to the task.. Nitride is ideal for barrels.  Nickel-boron is better for the BCG.

BTW, NiB will not stain (or at least mine has not at about 2k rounds) if you lightly coat all parts, especially the bolt, with a high detergent diesel engine synthetic motor oil.  Diesel engines run  very dirty with high carbon deposit potential.  Shell Rotella T6 5w40 has kept my NiB BCG looking great and easy to wipe clean with no scraping whatsoever.

This photo of my disassembled WMD NiB BCG is at somewhere between 1,800 and 1,900 rounds.  The lube I use is in the background.

Link Posted: 8/30/2015 12:01:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2015 12:03:48 AM EDT by Lug1]
MS556, you post on matching metallurgy...I would suggest you touch, feel, and use a nitride before dismissing it if you haven't(in the bcg category).  Moreover, the NIB adds to the dimensions being the coating you speak of.  I am not particularly a fan of of the NIB coated bcgs owning just 1 that I HAD to have.  Its a coating, it can flake or peel, it is not that much more lubricious than nitride.  Or at least it is different than nitride.  I would take a nitride bcg over my fail zero.  My fail zero is a quality bcg.  Just cost too much.  So I do not see where your metallurgy statement comes into play.  The nitride works absolutely great on bcgs.  I am not sure where NIB falls because I have seen other NIB's fail head space check.  Not saying all of them do.  So I am saying there is no inherent reason that I can see where REAL metallurgy comes into play here as long as you are using appropriate metals for your components.  





Nitrided bcgs make fine bcgs without adding dimensions.  Using quality 9310 or C158 bolts would be imperative.  There are many out there that work great.  I will for the most part stay with parkerized and chrome lined.  Warming up fast to the AIM nitrides.  


 



ALSO:  I have never even scraped a parkerized bolt.  Clean them after you use them and don't let them cake up, they are really easy to clean if they were lubed from the beginning.  
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 1:03:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2015 1:06:20 AM EDT by MS556]
Good points.  It is my understanding that the WMD BCGs are undercut to allow for the plating.  Of course chrome lined barrels are plated and seem to have extremely long lives, so peeling or flaking would be an issue only if the mfg does not do it properly,  it would seem.

I'm with you on the issue of regular cleaning after a day of shooting.  Just a wipe off and light relube.  

I do wonder how a nitride BCG would do in test to failure full auto torture testprotocol posted on Fail Zero s website in which they compared their BCG to phosphate milspec under some pretty extreme conditions.  I do love nitride barrels.
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 1:11:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2015 1:16:52 AM EDT by dalle0001]
The slickest BCG I ever owned was a JP FMOS bolt. A lot of people don't believe it but as soon as you rack the bolt on one, you'll be hooked. It doesn't even feel like a BCG is even in there and it moves very smoothly. I mean ridiculously smooth. You'll probably spend hours talking about how smooth it is after buying one.

Only problem is that it is very pricey. Just don't tell anyone that part of this story.
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 3:44:49 AM EDT
MS556, doesn't the lubricity of NiB change over time as it wears?: https://robarguns.com/blog/2013/08/23/np3-vs-nickel-boron/
Tomac
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 9:24:59 AM EDT
Thanks for the info and perspective, and to MS556 for the detailed technical info - my experience has been with the mil spec parkerized BCGs, and I've never had issues save a little extra elbow grease while cleaning after heavy use but I'm admittedly a couple of years behind on my tech. For example... nitride barrels?

For the last few years I've been cleaning after every couple of trips to the range/local gravel pit, but haven't taken any of my rifles from their cases in a year (I know, I know... I've started a new business, which has resulted in a severe drought when it comes to spare time). I think what I'll do for the new builds will be nitride BCGs; seems like the more variables you can shave away when it comes to potential failure the better.


Link Posted: 8/30/2015 9:36:50 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By QtrHorse:
I bought my Toolcraft BCG's from WCarmory, they have the best price that I know of.  The AIM BCG's are also very reasonably priced.
View Quote


Just checked WC and couldn't find them listed.

I've ordered a ton of stuff from AIM, mostly ammo. It seems like Toolcraft edges them out in terms of OEMness, but I don't know who makes AIM's BCGs.
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 9:58:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2015 10:25:17 AM EDT by SailorJ]
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 10:36:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 11:17:53 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tomac:


Not NiB over park, not to me (especially when you can get excellent ToolCraft park'd bcg's for so little).  
But I have to admit I've been impressed w/AIM's $99 V2 Nitride bcg (Bryan at AIM has stated their Nitride bcg's get the fewest warranty calls).
I'm currently running a reliability test on a new V2, it was initially cleaned/lubed then used for 750rds when more lube was added, currently at 1,300rds and still 100%, going for 1,500rds before I finally clean it.
Tomac
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tomac:
Originally Posted By NCFLAR15:
So....NiB not worth the added expense over park'd, or is it?


Not NiB over park, not to me (especially when you can get excellent ToolCraft park'd bcg's for so little).  
But I have to admit I've been impressed w/AIM's $99 V2 Nitride bcg (Bryan at AIM has stated their Nitride bcg's get the fewest warranty calls).
I'm currently running a reliability test on a new V2, it was initially cleaned/lubed then used for 750rds when more lube was added, currently at 1,300rds and still 100%, going for 1,500rds before I finally clean it.
Tomac


Toolcraft looks nice at $110, but the last Aim I ordered went out the door shipped for $80.
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 11:21:49 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sebois:


Just checked WC and couldn't find them listed.

I've ordered a ton of stuff from AIM, mostly ammo. It seems like Toolcraft edges them out in terms of OEMness, but I don't know who makes AIM's BCGs.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sebois:
Originally Posted By QtrHorse:
I bought my Toolcraft BCG's from WCarmory, they have the best price that I know of.  The AIM BCG's are also very reasonably priced.


Just checked WC and couldn't find them listed.

I've ordered a ton of stuff from AIM, mostly ammo. It seems like Toolcraft edges them out in terms of OEMness, but I don't know who makes AIM's BCGs.


Toolcraft BCG's
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 12:49:00 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By QtrHorse:


Toolcraft BCG's
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By QtrHorse:
Originally Posted By sebois:
Originally Posted By QtrHorse:
I bought my Toolcraft BCG's from WCarmory, they have the best price that I know of.  The AIM BCG's are also very reasonably priced.


Just checked WC and couldn't find them listed.

I've ordered a ton of stuff from AIM, mostly ammo. It seems like Toolcraft edges them out in terms of OEMness, but I don't know who makes AIM's BCGs.


Toolcraft BCG's


Thanks for the link - I was looking for the TC nitride BCG rather than the park'd MPI version.
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 12:51:32 PM EDT
Send him an email.  I have seen his BCG's at my local gun show and they look to be nitride, maybe listed incorrectly.
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 3:23:19 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SailorJ:
If a Nickel Boron bolt fails headspace then the bolt was probably  out of spec, before and after the plating. Typical plating will be around .0005" thick.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SailorJ:



Originally Posted By Lug1:

MS556, you post on matching metallurgy...I would suggest you touch, feel, and use a nitride before dismissing it if you haven't(in the bcg category).  Moreover, the NIB adds to the dimensions being the coating you speak of.  I am not particularly a fan of of the NIB coated bcgs owning just 1 that I HAD to have.  Its a coating, it can flake or peel, it is not that much more lubricious than nitride.  Or at least it is different than nitride.  I would take a nitride bcg over my fail zero.  My fail zero is a quality bcg.  Just cost too much.  So I do not see where your metallurgy statement comes into play.  The nitride works absolutely great on bcgs.  I am not sure where NIB falls because I have seen other NIB's fail head space check.  Not saying all of them do.  So I am saying there is no inherent reason that I can see where REAL metallurgy comes into play here as long as you are using appropriate metals for your components.  



Nitrided bcgs make fine bcgs without adding dimensions.  Using quality 9310 or C158 bolts would be imperative.  There are many out there that work great.  I will for the most part stay with parkerized and chrome lined.  Warming up fast to the AIM nitrides.  

 



ALSO:  I have never even scraped a parkerized bolt.  Clean them after you use them and don't let them cake up, they are really easy to clean if they were lubed from the beginning.  





If a Nickel Boron bolt fails headspace then the bolt was probably  out of spec, before and after the plating. Typical plating will be around .0005" thick.
It is entirely possible.  I had 3 barrels last year that failed headspace with multiple bolts.  My point being I have also had a barrel fail with one bolt and pass with another.  You don't have that option with treated or coated sets.  We all like different things.  I can't stress enough my Fail Zero NIB bcg is a good performer.  Nothing wrong with it, except the price tag.  It's good to have options, my favorite option is a phosphate chrome lined option.  I am warming up to the nitride bcgs though.  

 
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 3:25:11 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MS556:


Good points.  It is my understanding that the WMD BCGs are undercut to allow for the plating.  Of course chrome lined barrels are plated and seem to have extremely long lives, so peeling or flaking would be an issue only if the mfg does not do it properly,  it would seem.



I'm with you on the issue of regular cleaning after a day of shooting.  Just a wipe off and light relube.  



I do wonder how a nitride BCG would do in test to failure full auto torture testprotocol posted on Fail Zero s website in which they compared their BCG to phosphate milspec under some pretty extreme conditions.  I do love nitride barrels.
View Quote
I very much wonder this myself.  I was never a fan of the nitride bolts.  Until my buddy started ordering them.  They are very appealing.  I do not own one yet.  I still have several phosphate bcgs on the shelf to go through before I would get to a nitride but.....

 
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 4:08:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2015 4:09:01 PM EDT by MS556]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tomac:
MS556, doesn't the lubricity of NiB change over time as it wears?: https://robarguns.com/blog/2013/08/23/np3-vs-nickel-boron/
Tomac
View Quote


Apparently not enough to matter at 40,000 rounds.

WMD NiB-X at 40,000 rounds
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 6:16:41 PM EDT
Grease is cheaper than fancy coatings.

Call me old fashioned, but I don't like shiney bolts.
Link Posted: 8/30/2015 6:39:11 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Eat_Beef:


Grease is cheaper than fancy coatings.



Call me old fashioned, but I don't like shiney bolts.
View Quote
Grease for an AR?

 
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 11:59:26 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mitsuman47:
Grease for an AR?  
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mitsuman47:
Originally Posted By Eat_Beef:
Grease is cheaper than fancy coatings.

Call me old fashioned, but I don't like shiney bolts.
Grease for an AR?  



Shhhh.  The grown ups are talking.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 1:19:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2015 1:21:00 PM EDT by Unreconstructed]
Toolcraft marked phosphate BCG - $92.38
http://www.wcarmory.com/toolcraft-bcg-223-5-56-bolt-carrier-group-black-1b1b6-c-158-mpi-complete.htm

Toolcraft marked NiB BCG - $106.24
http://www.wcarmory.com/toolcraft-bcg-223-5-56-bolt-carrier-group-ni-bo-t-c-engraved-mpi-9310-complete.htm

NiB costs $13.86 more than phosphate in this example.

Grown ups are capable of making an informed decision based on cost vs. benefit.  Many here are not grown ups.

I am considering the advantages of hard chrome, NiB, NP3, Nitiride, etc.  From what I have read, it appears reasonable that "shiney bolts" have some benefit over phosphate in coefficient of friction, corrosion resistance, etc.  There is very little difference in cost in many cases.  Looks worthwhile to consider to me without the bs insults.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 1:30:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2015 1:33:40 PM EDT by MS556]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Unreconstructed:
Toolcraft marked phosphate BCG - $92.38
http://www.wcarmory.com/toolcraft-bcg-223-5-56-bolt-carrier-group-black-1b1b6-c-158-mpi-complete.htm

Toolcraft marked NiB BCG - $106.24
http://www.wcarmory.com/toolcraft-bcg-223-5-56-bolt-carrier-group-ni-bo-t-c-engraved-mpi-9310-complete.htm

NiB costs $13.86 more than phosphate in this example.

Grown ups are capable of making an informed decision based on cost vs. benefit.  Many here are not grown ups.

I am considering the advantages of hard chrome, NiB, NP3, Nitiride, etc.  From what I have read, it appears reasonable that "shiney bolts" have some benefit over phosphate in coefficient of friction, corrosion resistance, etc.  There is very little difference in cost in many cases.  Looks worthwhile to consider to me without the bs insults.
View Quote


Well said.  And "grease" is not what you want on a BCG, not even phosphate.  A good grade of lubricant, but it ain't grease.  Not unless you want to attract and keep a lot of dirt, debris, sand and everything else that grease attracts and holds.

That guy probably has  no light bulbs in his house, either because, well . . . candles work just fine, and cheaper than electricity, right?  Let's not let innovation, even if incremental,  lead to improvement, right?




Link Posted: 8/31/2015 6:22:43 PM EDT
You completely misunderstood me.  I don't like shiny bolts.  As in I don't like a bolt that shines, regardless of which coating causes it to shine.

I agree that NiB is slicker than phosphate, but I don't find this to be worth the added $13, or the added silver spot on the side of my rifle.

I would like to know how many of you guys who are afraid of grease have actually had a malfunction caused by grease.  Grease will be full of junk, yes, but it will still be lubricating when oil has dripped, run, and cooked off.


The "no grease" comment was childish.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:26:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2015 7:35:53 PM EDT by SailorJ]
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:50:26 PM EDT
I don't like shiny because of the probability that it will reflect light, and someone or something I don't want to see will see it.  It has nothing to do with cosmetics, it has to do with stealth.

I've never run an AR dry.  I put grease on it, and it's there for years, and thousands of rounds.  That is exactly the reason I don't use oil (although I hear there are some oils now that stick well, but grease has already proven itself to me.)
Top Top