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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/4/2005 3:33:43 PM EDT
I remember there being a thread about this a while back, but I can't find it and since I didn't have a CF FF tube at the time I didn't pay enough attention to it. I've got a DPMS rifle length length tube that I want to cut down to carbine length. Any ideas what blade and RPM to use?
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 4:14:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2005 4:35:22 AM EDT by eklikwhoa]
a very sharp one and really fast, seriously i dont know the specifics but the sharper the better, along with the faster.



why not send it back and get the correct one? the resin/coat will crack at the edge and will look nasty!

eta: found a similar thread for you here
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 4:36:52 AM EDT
I can see by the marks on the end of the tube that they cut it with something and there is no fraying or cracking whatsoever. Someone must know what's used to cut these things.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 5:31:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2005 5:44:02 AM EDT by TheRealKiller]
My guess carbide tipped blade in a chop saw clap tube in place run saw up to full speed and make one smooth cut.

www.midwestproducts.com/carbonfiber.htm


Guess I'm wrong looks like a abrasive is what is recomended still same deal use a hot saw run it up and cut it off



tile saw


yep eveything I find says high speed abrasives
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 1:54:26 PM EDT
Thanks, I guess I could have done a google search, but I know Carbon FF Tube cutting was specifically discussed here in the past, and I was hoping someone remembered the conclusion.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 3:29:35 PM EDT
I worked for a long time in several aircraft carbon fiber factories and they only used two methods in cutting.

The most common method is using a high speed carbide router. The router bit looks like a rough file (triangular shaped spikes). A guide tool is used which controls the location of the router when trimming.

The second less used method is water jet or CNC controlled water jet.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:16:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/6/2005 7:29:04 PM EDT by Fenian]
I asked the same question...I have a Clark Custom tube I want cut from full to carbine length. After no one came up with a good method that I *knew* would work, I called Clark...they'll cut the tube for me for free, and $10 for return shipping. I guess I'll drop it in the mail on Monday.

You could just call Clark and ask them what they do
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:45:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Alpha-Romeo3:

The most common method is using a high speed carbide router. The router bit looks like a rough file (triangular shaped spikes). A guide tool is used which controls the location of the router when trimming.

The second less used method is water jet or CNC controlled water jet.




The first statement is very accurate. Actually any "metal" chop saw blade with VERY fine teeth will cut nicely. As long as the saw being used has a high RPM (maybe 6000-10000 rpm), and the blade is metal with VERY FINE teeth, it should work fine.

The second statement is also very accurate, but if you can afford a water jet cutter (especially CNC) you better be able to afford a new Carbon FF tube. LOL

Link Posted: 8/8/2005 9:02:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pup-dawg:

Originally Posted By Alpha-Romeo3:

The most common method is using a high speed carbide router. The router bit looks like a rough file (triangular shaped spikes). A guide tool is used which controls the location of the router when trimming.

The second less used method is water jet or CNC controlled water jet.




The first statement is very accurate. Actually any "metal" chop saw blade with VERY fine teeth will cut nicely. As long as the saw being used has a high RPM (maybe 6000-10000 rpm), and the blade is metal with VERY FINE teeth, it should work fine.

The second statement is also very accurate, but if you can afford a water jet cutter (especially CNC) you better be able to afford a new Carbon FF tube. LOL


I don't know if smaller size companies use saw blades to trim their parts. The large companies I had work for only used saw blades to trim their test coupons.

These days CNC controlled routers are used by big companies to meet tighter tolerances (+/- 0.010 in.) of new aircraft models. Hand routing methods could not pass the new tighter tolerances.
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 9:08:34 AM EDT
I asked about this once before and was advised that the dust and fibers will stick in you lungs and cause problems. Cut it wet and/or wear a good respirator to be safe.
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 9:26:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By in_burrito:
I asked about this once before and was advised that the dust and fibers will stick in you lungs and cause problems. Cut it wet and/or wear a good respirator to be safe.


All hand routing shops that I worked with uses a booth similar to a paint booth to catch the carbon fiber dust.

Carbon fiber dust is very bad stuff, always wear goggles, a good spray painting respirator and ear protection.

Using a shop vacuum with HEPA filter is recommended when a trim booth is not available.

There are still a lot to learn about new developments in carbon fibers. I only have 20 yrs. experience, I know nothing. LOL

I was ISO 9001 certified in Advanced Statistical Process Control and practiced it for six years.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 9:14:39 AM EDT
I cut mine (Clark) carefully with a new hacksaw blade. I was very careful to keep the cut as square as possible. When I was done with the initial cut, I refinished the cut end on progressively finer sand paper attached to my workbench, being careful to keep the tube perpendicular to the bench. Looks factory cut (actually a little better than the original cut).
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 12:27:35 PM EDT
I just got a call from Clarks...they're shipping my tube back to me today. Hope to see it by Sat. at the latest.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 2:33:31 PM EDT
I use scissors.



Oh wait, that's before the resin.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 5:28:58 PM EDT
My local archery shop uses a high speed wheel to cut carbon fiber arrows, so this may be a thought.

77Bronc
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 7:25:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 77Bronc:
My local archery shop uses a high speed wheel to cut carbon fiber arrows, so this may be a thought.

77Bronc



Or find a Golf repair shop since they also have the same cutters for cutting graphit golf shafts
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