Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/26/2005 2:58:44 PM EDT

I read about using these weights in the carrier to help felt recoil....do they work?

Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:02:45 PM EDT
Would probably increase felt recoil
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:04:28 PM EDT


Buffers maybe?

That is a picture of the lightest steel AR carrier made, BTW.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:26:41 PM EDT
There's an article in them in the newest guns and ammo I think....editor talks about them being great.

Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:32:26 PM EDT
I can't help feeling that anyone who is concerned about recoil of the .223 in an AR-15 should switch to .22 Rimfire.

Would someone explain just how this marvel of physics is supposed to work?
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:36:04 PM EDT
Supposed to slow the cycle rate !
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:41:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2005 3:42:27 PM EDT by WS4LIF]
it's heavy.......so it doens't move back as fast...........how is this a hard consept to grasp?

People who are conserned with recoil are people who shoot matches and need to put a double tap in a target in a half second within an inch.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:54:47 PM EDT
The increase mass does slow down the bolt and unlocking sequence but, you are adding reciprocating weight to the one thing that moves and slams into the back of the stock, This will give the perception of more recoil vice less,
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:58:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By STLRN:
The increase mass does slow down the bolt and unlocking sequence but, you are adding reciprocating weight to the one thing that moves and slams into the back of the stock, This will give the perception of more recoil vice less,



True, but it also moves more slowly, which is generally easier to control. Thats why H buffers are so popular.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 3:58:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2005 3:58:56 PM EDT by SHIVAN]

Originally Posted By STLRN:
The increase mass does slow down the bolt and unlocking sequence but, you are adding reciprocating weight to the one thing that moves and slams into the back of the stock, This will give the perception of more recoil vice less,



Actually it will lengthen the recoil impulse to the rear, giving the perception of smoother, "softer", recoil.


This effect is VERY noticeable in the big bore AR's like the 458 SOCOM, 50 Beowulf, and 499LW.


Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:04:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WS4LIF:
it's heavy.......so it doens't move back as fast...........how is this a hard consept to grasp?

People who are conserned with recoil are people who shoot matches and need to put a double tap in a target in a half second within an inch.

+1

In service rifle competition its 10 shots in 60 seconds and 10 in 70 seconds, but there are combat matches that require double taps as fast as possible. Also its a plus to be able to shoot fast in service rifle comp. on the rapid stages as long as accuracy does not suffer because there is less chance the wind can come up and move the shot as there is no time to wait out the wind gusts.

These weights make very little difference, some do like them. My take on them is while they do something to the perceived recoil, im really not sure it has any effect on sight picture, I do not run them. I think what they do best is line the pocket of the big name that sells them as is the case with most he offers for sale. Just my opinion, worth what you paid for it.

Interesting side bar to this is some install heavier springs to supposedly cusion the recoil however what happens is the bolt now closes harder causing movement. Sort of like swapping one evil for another.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:04:19 PM EDT
They're an alternative to heavy buffers. They are tailorable -- insert alone, insert + steel weight, or insert + tungsten weight. They allow bolt to stay locked up a bit longer, which as long as your gun continues to function is a good thing.

If used as is, you must pop both pins to separate the upper from the lower. That's because your buffer, under spring pressure, will capture the flange and not let to upper pivot away from the lower. You can have a smith counterbore your carrier so the carrier insert seats flush with it at which point you can just pop the rear pin and your upper will pivot.

Recoil should be no different than if using a heavy buffer.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:04:52 PM EDT
Reduce felt recoil??? It's a .223/5.56mm... not a .458 Win Magnum....
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:11:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SSFeldjager:
Reduce felt recoil??? It's a .223/5.56mm... not a .458 Win Magnum....



Some of use like to be able to fire 5 shots per second into a playing card at 5 yards.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:11:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2005 4:14:29 PM EDT by 200-10x]
See this link.... David Tubb has won the National High Power championship about a zillion time.

I use his springs and CWS (carrier weight system) in my 20" Service Rifle. It works great. There is also a system and springs for carbines. There have been a ton of threads about "heavy buffers". This is essentially the same thing, only the weight is in the carrier, not the buffer. During recoil they move together. It's the "timing" of the beginning of the travel of the bolt and carrier that gives the impression of less recoil, it comes over a longer period of time.

It allegedly helps with some extraction problems as well, but I can't comment on this from personal experience as I wasn't experiencing extraction problems before using it.

By the way (or should that be "weigh", lol)... he's got lots of other products on his website. But here's the link to the CWS page.
David Tubbs CWS

If you're interested in the high end of AR performance, and you don't need to be a High Power competitor to appreciate some of this stuff, check out Glenn Zediker's site:
Glenn Zediker's AR site

he literally "wrote the book" on getting the most out of AR accuracy.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:15:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2005 4:16:46 PM EDT by txgp17]

Originally Posted By SHIVAN:
Actually it will lengthen the recoil impulse to the rear, giving the perception of smoother, "softer", recoil.


Ding Ding Ding!!!!
We have a winner.
Not much can "lessen" recoil except a muzzle brake or less powder in the case pushing against your body. But other things change the rate that recoil is transferred to your body, and your perception is that it may, (or may not) kick less. The slower the carrier travels, then the more time it takes to transfer that energy to your shoulder, making the recoil feel more like a push, rather than a "kick." YMMV.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:18:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By STLRN:
The increase mass does slow down the bolt and unlocking sequence but, you are adding reciprocating weight to the one thing that moves and slams into the back of the stock, This will give the perception of more recoil vice less,


Recoil is going to be constant M*V. If you increase the M then V will decrease. Likewise, with a ligher M, V will increase. All it does is change how the recoil impulse is felt.

The only real way to reduce recoil is to shoot a lighter load.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 4:20:44 PM EDT

Some of use like to be able to fire 5 shots per second into a playing card at 5 yards.


Hmmm... OK. You win. Good reason; never tried that one...
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 5:11:07 PM EDT
tag to check out sites at home
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 9:08:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2005 9:09:02 PM EDT by MurdockTheCrazy]
What recoil?

Top Top