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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/17/2004 5:30:15 PM EST
I understand that a free floating foreend attaches to the receiver, but not the muzzle end of the barrel...
I also understand that this reduces pressure on the barrel that would normally be caused by the attachement of the foreend to the front sight-post area, which can potentially bend the barrel, etc...

What I dont understand is how it is more accurate to mount the front sight post (for iron sights) or scope to the rail system.
The sights would be zeroed to the receiver, and If the barrel floats independently, there would be a decrease in accuracy, wouldnt there? To maintain optimal accuracy, do you have to use a barrel-mounted front sight post?

I could buy that there is enough rigidity between the barrel and the receiver for a receiver-mounted scope to be accurate, but if a freefloating foreend is intended to reduce barrel flex (implying that the foreend is expected to flex), then a foreend mounted front sight-post would seem problematic.

If any of you smart-guys can explain the underlying inadequecies of my theory, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks
Link Posted: 10/17/2004 5:37:00 PM EST
You are completely correct. The purpose of a free floating handguard is to reduce barrel flex when a sling is used, the sling being attached to the handguard. I fail to understand what advantage there is to mount optics to something that is designed to flex instead of the barrel. I mount my optics to the receiver.
Link Posted: 10/17/2004 7:07:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By gus:
You are completely correct. The purpose of a free floating handguard is to reduce barrel flex when a sling is used, the sling being attached to the handguard. I fail to understand what advantage there is to mount optics to something that is designed to flex instead of the barrel. I mount my optics to the receiver.



Gus, it is acctually for those who mount the sling to the barrel mounted attachments. Or, like me, use a single point sling but mount their optics forward of the receiver. Also if you run a FA rifle, you won't pull on the barrel if you use a forward vertical grip to reduce muzzel climb. FF has many advantages, these are just a few.
Link Posted: 10/17/2004 7:13:53 PM EST
Often they cool the barrel better. They are also a great heat sink.
Link Posted: 10/17/2004 7:31:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/17/2004 7:31:27 PM EST by Zak-Smith]
With a freefloated handguard, any force on the handguard will flex them with respect to the receiver and barrel, which ought not be affected. Thus if optics are mounted on the receiver, you have an accuracy improvement.

When BUIS must be mounted on the rail instead of the barrel for whatever reason, the user has to accept some accuracy degradation with the iron BUIS, but typically, we don't care.

-z
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