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Posted: 3/12/2015 8:35:47 PM EDT
I'm looking to buy my first AR.  I need some input on whether I should buy an AR whole or build using a complete upper and lower so I have a few questions.

Which would be cheaper as far as $$?
If I were to build an AR with a complete upper and lower what other things would I need such as bolt, charging handle, sights, etc?
Would there be more chance of a failure or other issue with a build vs whole AR?
If I were to build what bolt, etc. is recommended?
What would be a better quality rifle as far as either a RRA, S&W or a build from PSA?

Any help or suggestions are appreciated.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 8:40:44 PM EDT
What are you using it for and budget will be the question you will be asked. Building is diferent then putting a upper and lower together but its not a bad option to get a quality upper and a cheaper lower for a good price.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 8:42:30 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jkitchen:
What are you using it for and budget will be the question you will be asked. Building is diferent then putting a upper and lower together but its not a bad option to get a quality upper and a cheaper lower for a good price.
View Quote


+1
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 8:53:47 PM EDT
Either around or less than $1000. I already have Magpul sights and a red dot which I was going to put on my M&P15-22.

Use mainly for range and when SHTF.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 8:54:54 PM EDT
With prices as low as they are now for factory built rifles with warranties I would suggest you buy one.  Learn the rifle/platform.   Don't throw a bunch of tacti-cool parts on it that you don't need.  Shoot it a LOT and figure out for yourself what upgrades are necessary for you.

With those upgrades you will more than likely end up buying the tools that will allow you to build other rifles (ie barrel nut wrench, vise, torque wrench, punches, receiver block or reaction rod).

Buy the rifle.  Buy a good sling that will or can evolve with your skill set.  buy a GOOD weapon light.  Buy a TON of ammo.



Link Posted: 3/12/2015 8:57:26 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By balloo93:
With prices as low as they are now for factory built rifles with warranties I would suggest you buy one.  Learn the rifle/platform.   Don't throw a bunch of tacti-cool parts on it that you don't need.  Shoot it a LOT and figure out for yourself what upgrades are necessary for you.

With those upgrades you will more than likely end up buying the tools that will allow you to build other rifles (ie barrel nut wrench, vise, torque wrench, punches, receiver block or reaction rod).

Buy the rifle.  Buy a good sling that will or can evolve with your skill set.  buy a GOOD weapon light.  Buy a TON of ammo.



View Quote

This is good advice here ^
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:02:40 PM EDT
Colt 6920 is good for range and shtf for a 1000 and yeah buy for your first and stack up on mags and ammo.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:03:39 PM EDT
Would an RRA LAR-15 or S&W 15T be okay for a first AR?  and really don't want to do any mods other than obviously sights if need be.  I like the looks of them I've looked at the prices and they are right about or less than my budget. I haven't decided on a middy or carbine yet but I'm going to a gun show south of where I live next Saturday so I'll be able to get my hands on some rifles.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:08:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2015 9:10:25 PM EDT by OnlytheTip]
I built one of my favorite AR15's for under $600.00, with quality parts. An ACT trigger, Fail Zero NiB BCG, Magpul hardware, etc....... It's all about timing, buying from the right AR15.com Dealer's, and finally the Equipment Exchange.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:10:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Would an RRA LAR-15 or S&W 15T be okay for a first AR?  and really don't want to do any mods other than obviously sights if need be.  I like the looks of them I've looked at the prices and they are right about or less than my budget. I haven't decided on a middy or carbine yet but I'm going to a gun show south of where I live next Saturday so I'll be able to get my hands on some rifles.
View Quote


Those would be okay but how much under your budget? If only by $100-$150 why skimp and not get the colt for carbine length and if you want mid grab a decent complete lower at the show and order a BCM. Just my personal preference to go with a more solid quality rifle(not to say those ones are bad choices). Like one poster said prices are so low now you can get a solid gun for under $1000.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:12:06 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Would an RRA LAR-15 or S&W 15T be okay for a first AR?  and really don't want to do any mods other than obviously sights if need be.  I like the looks of them I've looked at the prices and they are right about or less than my budget. I haven't decided on a middy or carbine yet but I'm going to a gun show south of where I live next Saturday so I'll be able to get my hands on some rifles.
View Quote


Either would probably serve you well.  There are many good options for good prices these days.  The Colt for $799 at PSA would be a good option as well.

Personally, midlength gas makes more sense in a 16" barrel to me.  That being said I've owned both and really can't tell a difference.  Middy looks better if running stock length handguards.  I wouldn't sweat the middy vs. carbine thing at all if you find one or the other you like.

Oh yeah.....Balloo's advice above is solid ^^^^

Good luck!
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:20:26 PM EDT
To be honest I don't like the looks of the Colt. I know looks really shouldn't matter though. Also I'm not sure where my grip will be on the handrail so that could be too short for me.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:24:01 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By balloo93:
With prices as low as they are now for factory built rifles with warranties I would suggest you buy one.  Learn the rifle/platform.   Don't throw a bunch of tacti-cool parts on it that you don't need.  Shoot it a LOT and figure out for yourself what upgrades are necessary for you.

With those upgrades you will more than likely end up buying the tools that will allow you to build other rifles (ie barrel nut wrench, vise, torque wrench, punches, receiver block or reaction rod).

Buy the rifle.  Buy a good sling that will or can evolve with your skill set.  buy a GOOD weapon light.  Buy a TON of ammo.



View Quote



This!

And any other year, I'd recommend you build a quality AR for cheap. (That's what I did years ago) But prices now are ridiculously low for quality factory rifles with warranties and better resale value. You'll almost certainly buy more AR15s so even though you may doubt you'll ever sell this AR15... you might to get something else.

And in terms of resale, built guns simply do not get that much return back. Why would a buyer pay that much when they could build a new one themselves?
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 9:27:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2015 9:37:32 PM EDT by jkitchen]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
To be honest I don't like the looks of the Colt. I know looks really shouldn't matter though. Also I'm not sure where my grip will be on the handrail so that could be too short for me.
View Quote


If you can find a decent lower for a good price check out Bravo Company for midlength uppers they ship fast and have great quality also add the charging handle and BCG for $69. Its a full milspec bcg and one of the best charging handles on the market. You have a sight the only tbing you need is a hand gaurd and lower. I am only giving you advice on what I would do I'm sure these guys have good or better options.

Edit- http://www.bravocompanyusa.com/BCM-16-Mid-Length-Upper-Receiver-Group-p/bcm-urg-mid-16.htm
Here one
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 10:29:01 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Would an RRA LAR-15 or S&W 15T be okay for a first AR?  and really don't want to do any mods other than obviously sights if need be.  I like the looks of them I've looked at the prices and they are right about or less than my budget. I haven't decided on a middy or carbine yet but I'm going to a gun show south of where I live next Saturday so I'll be able to get my hands on some rifles.
View Quote


Either of those will serve you well.  Check with the site vendors for prices instead of going directly through the manufactures website.  For example Legal-transfers on here can get you below msrp prices on the RRA rifles.  Not sure about the S&W.  Shop around and see if anyone offers discounts or free shipping as well.

Find a FFL near you that will do a transfer for a reasonable price as well.  Ask in the HTF (Home Town Forum) as well to find a good FFL.

Link Posted: 3/12/2015 10:50:14 PM EDT
If I did decide to build from a complete upper and complete lower what would I need as far as tools, etc? I'm still completely up in the air as far as what to do.
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 11:19:51 PM EDT
Lower:
Stock wrench
Punch set
Screw driver or allen wrench for grip

Lower extras (make things easier):
Roll pin holders
1/4" hitch pin
bolt catch pin punch


Upper:
Vise
Receiver block (clam sell type) or reaction rod
Torque wrench
Barrel nut wrench
Punches
Barrel blocks
Proper grease for barrel nut
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 11:26:35 PM EDT
Oh geez. I thought all you needed to do was snap a complete upper and complete lower together. So what other mil-spec rifles are out there for around $1000 b e s I d e s Colt?
Link Posted: 3/12/2015 11:41:52 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Oh geez. I thought all you needed to do was snap a complete upper and complete lower together. So what other mil-spec rifles are out there for around $1000 b e s I d e s Colt?
View Quote


Spikes middy.  Think I seen them for $799 at AIM when they aren't sold out.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 12:15:53 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Oh geez. I thought all you needed to do was snap a complete upper and complete lower together. So what other mil-spec rifles are out there for around $1000 b e s I d e s Colt?
View Quote


Ha, Ha, no I misread.  If you are building from a complete lower and upper then yes, two push pins and you're done.

Link Posted: 3/13/2015 12:17:47 AM EDT
I agree with the 6920 Pony boys. It is a solid foundation as is outa the box, or for carbine excessory whores. ;)
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 12:19:13 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Oh geez. I thought all you needed to do was snap a complete upper and complete lower together. So what other mil-spec rifles are out there for around $1000 b e s I d e s Colt?
View Quote


If you buy a complete upper and a complete lower then yes, you just need to put the upper on the lower and go shooting. It would take 10sec..

If you're looking at that option get a complete Lower from PSA for $150ish and a complete upper from BCM for $500-1000 depending on how much you want to spend. BCM has many, many different uppers available.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 12:27:54 AM EDT
What is the ETA on PSA parts? Any other companies who have complete uppers and lowers with a decent ETA?
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 12:35:07 AM EDT
In the very least, don't skimp on the upper because it is the heart of the rifle. Check out the wide variety of complete assembled uppers from BCM. they are still running their free bolt carrier group and muzzle device if you buy a 16" upper. Then you can save some cash by assembling your own lower with a good solid lower parts kit. Joe Bob Outfitters, Brownells, Primary Arms, and Midwayusa have been my go-to's for good prices on in stock items.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 6:50:25 AM EDT
Build. But buy all the parts used here on the equipment exchange.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 7:12:19 AM EDT
Buy your first rifle. Then build one. At least this is how I did it. I bought my first AR in September of 2014 and took it to the range a few times. Then a month later I built one.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 7:39:38 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
If I did decide to build from a complete upper and complete lower what would I need as far as tools, etc? I'm still completely up in the air as far as what to do.
View Quote

I built a complete quality rifle with top name parts piece by piece and only needed one punch a vice, and an armorers wrench. I'm sure its nice with with all the proper tools but can be done really easily without. A good wrench and punches are main thing. I do agree with above statements thought. Factory rifles come with warranty and support and are cheap right now. You can always build on it later but might find you like it and save on all the extras.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 10:22:05 AM EDT
I don't really consider buying a complete upper and lower a build. That said, you can probably save a few bucks buying a complete rifle or a complete upper/lower combo vs. piecing one together from parts. However, if you have specific parts in mind that would require you to swap parts out you'll probably end up spending more and doing half the work of a build anyway.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 11:04:24 AM EDT
I'm firmly in the build camp. For me building something gives me a greater sense of accomplishment and satisfaction over just buying something pre-made.   I realize not everyone has the patience, mechanical aptitude, or tools required to build your own though.  I think in the long run building will be cheaper if you heavily customize your rifle.  i.e. new furniture, brakes, barrels, etc.  Building your own lets you pick out each and every part you want before hand that way you don't have a handful of parts you have paid for with your complete rifle that just sits on a shelf collecting dust.  Of course doing it that way requires more planning, more research, and more patience.  Like others have said I don't consider buying an upper and lower and slapping them together to be building a rifle.  That's like buying a shirt and pants and putting them on and saying that you made your own outfit.  But, that is a legitimate way to do it and a good alternative if you don't want to build it yourself.  I think a good compromise would be to buy your barreled upper and build your lower as the lower requires less specialized tools to build.  Just a $7 castle nut wrench and some punches.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 11:12:13 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Either around or less than $1000. I already have Magpul sights and a red dot which I was going to put on my M&P15-22.

Use mainly for range and when SHTF.
View Quote


If you just want an AR, and want to get one for as cheap as possible - just go out and buy one - you can get a quality rifle for $700-800 easily.  Building is more expensive than buying these days.  If you want something unique and special, then consider building one.

http://www.slickguns.com/product/ar15-rifle-comparison-700-or-less
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 11:41:35 AM EDT
I think I'm going to look into the complete upper and complete lower option and compare prices as far as buying a complete rifle versus upper and lower.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 11:46:25 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By balloo93:
With prices as low as they are now for factory built rifles with warranties I would suggest you buy one.  Learn the rifle/platform.   Don't throw a bunch of tacti-cool parts on it that you don't need.  Shoot it a LOT and figure out for yourself what upgrades are necessary for you.

With those upgrades you will more than likely end up buying the tools that will allow you to build other rifles (ie barrel nut wrench, vise, torque wrench, punches, receiver block or reaction rod).

Buy the rifle.  Buy a good sling that will or can evolve with your skill set.  buy a GOOD weapon light.  Buy a TON of ammo.



View Quote


The man speaks the truth
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 11:50:53 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
What is the ETA on PSA parts? Any other companies who have complete uppers and lowers with a decent ETA?
View Quote


With PSA, it al depends on what you order. I ordered ammo from them about a month ago and it took almost two weeks. I ordered a stripped lower from the on March 3rd and it arrived on March 6th. If you are looking at PSA brand uppers and lowers, you can save a lot of cash and get a good quality AR as long as you know what you are looking at. Stay from the PTAC stuff. It is hit and miss. The PSA Premium stuff is good to go. I priced out a PSA Premium M4 type AR for a guy the other day and it came in around $588 with the MAGPUL MBUS rear sight. They have some good sales everyday on various components. Here is a good deal on a complete lower assembly.

http://palmettostatearmory.com/index.php/catalog/product/view/id/15072/category/4282/

Here are a couple nice upper assemblies with free-float lightweight handguards.

http://palmettostatearmory.com/index.php/ar-15-05/barreled-upper-assemblies/psa-16-chf-stainless-steel-5-56-1-7-lw-ssk12-upper-without-bcg-or-ch.html

http://palmettostatearmory.com/index.php/ar-15-05/barreled-upper-assemblies/psa-16-chf-pencil-ssk-12-without-bcg-or-charging-handle.html

You will need to add a charging handle.....

http://palmettostatearmory.com/index.php/ar-15-05/upper-parts/charging-handles/ar15-m16-charging-handle.html

and a bolt carrier group. They are currently out of stock of their Premium BCGS, but I would recommend looking at Primary Arms. They have a Spikes Tactical BCG for a decent price.

https://www.primaryarms.com/Spikes_Tactical_AR15_Complete_Bolt_Carrier_Gr_p/st5bg01.htm

When it comes to factory ARs, there are so many out there that are worth having for well under $1000. Snapping together an upper and lower assembly is an easy way to go as well. It is all a matter of what you are wanting. I have built over three dozen AR in the past eleven years and I have owned almost four dozen. I currently own 31 ARs with one more to be finished next week. If you would like some personal help, fell free to contact me. Good luck on your decision.

reaja@cox.net

Link Posted: 3/13/2015 11:59:03 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JayC:
Building is more expensive than buying these days.  If you want something unique and special, then consider building one.
View Quote


I built a couple of ARs recently for less than $400 each. You can build cheaper than buying, but you have to know what you're doing. And you have to factor in the cost of tools. If you plan on building multiple rifles, it's definitely cheaper. If you only build one, buying is cheaper. OTOH, having tools lets you do your own repairs instead of hiring someone else to do it.

If you build your own, you can build exactly what you want the first time. If you buy something, you'll probably end up buying and replacing stuff, and spending more money in the long run than if you built what you wanted in the first place.

There's also the educational factor. How much do you value expanding your knowledge of how ARs work?
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 12:21:34 PM EDT
Quite a bit. Problem is I am majorly mechanically challenged so would buying a complete upper and complete lower make sense in this situation?
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 12:25:30 PM EDT
If I were to buy a rife complete, I would get a BCM casue you can usually find those pretty close to 1k, If I wanted to kinda build one to stay closer to my budget I would get a complete upper from BCM then a complete lower like this-

https://www.classicfirearms.com/omegae3reccomplete

Its polymer, but for now you will be fine. Then hunt for an Anderson lower cheap and swap the parts eventually. then you can have an extra lower for a Light Weight build.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 1:35:01 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By foursixty:


Spikes middy.  Think I seen them for $799 at AIM when they aren't sold out.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By foursixty:
Originally Posted By JesB:
Oh geez. I thought all you needed to do was snap a complete upper and complete lower together. So what other mil-spec rifles are out there for around $1000 b e s I d e s Colt?


Spikes middy.  Think I seen them for $799 at AIM when they aren't sold out.


I went this direction when I bought my first AR!! An the spikes middy was been great!!
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 1:39:29 PM EDT
Step 1: Buy a complete upper of your choosing

Step 2: go to your lg and buy a lower receiver

Step 3: Order a lpk, Bcg, stock, and. Charging handle

Step 4: get some punches

Step 5: watch a couple videos on YouTube

Step 6:build your lower

Step 7: attach upper to lower
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 2:20:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2015 2:26:48 PM EDT by jrs93accord]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JesB:
Quite a bit. Problem is I am majorly mechanically challenged so would buying a complete upper and complete lower make sense in this situation?
View Quote


It would make a lot of sense. I have a buddy of mine that ordered a complete upper assembly, complete lower assembly, a red-dot optic, and BUISs from PSA a couple weeks ago. Most of the stuff has already arrived. He still has to go pick up the lower from his FFL when he gets back off the boat. This will be a real easy snap-together AR for him. He wanted something easy to assemble and this was the route he went. He opted for an upper with the free-float handguard because he like the clean look and the versatility.

Once you assemble this AR, you can then learn it functions and nomenclature. You can see how things are assembled. I built my second AR and I used my first one as a guide to build it. I had already had many years of using an M16, but never got into all of the mechanics of it. So, 11 years ago, I began learning the ins and outs with my factory built one. I also started modifying it as soon as I got it. That is what prompted me to start building my own. I had too many spare parts laying around. I started by buying the barreled upper assembly I wanted and building my own lower assemblies. Eventually, I began assembling my own uppers. The thing is that I had skills already. I am very mechanically inclined. It was nothing for me to do this. In your case, I do recommend buying the upper and lower assemblies you want to begin with.
Link Posted: 3/13/2015 11:38:25 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/14/2015 12:09:00 AM EDT
I chose to build my Aero Precision rifle over buying a LE6920.  I spent about the same amount but ended up learning a ton about the guns construction and personalizing a lot of the parts.  I vote build it!
Link Posted: 3/14/2015 12:47:50 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History



Excellent rifle and excellent price.

OP-  DO NOT go polymer on your first rifle.  If you feel the need to play with one later, pick it up cheap and try it out.  If you only have 1 rifle make it one with a forged lower.

Link Posted: 3/14/2015 6:30:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2015 6:32:57 AM EDT by CavScout8]
Buy your first, as a complete upper and a complete lower.

It's expensive to tool up to build to do it halfway right. You also have to hunt down a lot of parts unless you're going with a build kit and using whatever they give you anyway. A build will generally be less reliable and not stand up to hard use the way a quality factory built weapon. If you order all sorts of different parts, you'll likely end up with compatibility issues somewhere, and need to return/replace certain parts. It'll generally take you a long time to build something due to waiting on parts.

Buy your first, then you have that base covered. I'd still recommend building one at some point in the future, but builds SHOULDN'T be your go-to weapons (generally speaking).

Would you want to put your life on the line with a weapon built from bottom of the barrel parts that no LE agency or the mil would ever touch, and then have it put together by an amateur garage tinkerer??
Link Posted: 3/14/2015 9:47:59 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CavScout8:
I'd still recommend building one at some point in the future, but builds SHOULDN'T be your go-to weapons (generally speaking).
View Quote


Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.

It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.
Link Posted: 3/14/2015 9:53:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2015 9:56:40 AM EDT by hotbiggun42]
Aim Surplus has a great deal on a complete Spikes AR.

They also have complete spikes uppers for $499 and complete spikes lowers for $260 free shipping . Personally I would go with the complete rifle it comes with a hard case and rear flip up sights
Link Posted: 3/14/2015 9:57:11 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jonwienke:


Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.

It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.
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Originally Posted By jonwienke:
Originally Posted By CavScout8:
I'd still recommend building one at some point in the future, but builds SHOULDN'T be your go-to weapons (generally speaking).


Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.

It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.


Absolutely right. I have built over three dozen ARs over the past 11 years and I trust each and every one of them Even the ones I sold off, I never had one complaint or problem. I build mine to hold up and to work very well. If I am not happy with it, I make it right. I would put up my builds against any similar factory ARs.
Link Posted: 3/14/2015 3:15:46 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By jrs93accord:


Absolutely right. I have built over three dozen ARs over the past 11 years and I trust each and every one of them Even the ones I sold off, I never had one complaint or problem. I build mine to hold up and to work very well. If I am not happy with it, I make it right. I would put up my builds against any similar factory ARs.
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Originally Posted By jrs93accord:
Originally Posted By jonwienke:
Originally Posted By CavScout8:
I'd still recommend building one at some point in the future, but builds SHOULDN'T be your go-to weapons (generally speaking).


Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.

It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.


Absolutely right. I have built over three dozen ARs over the past 11 years and I trust each and every one of them Even the ones I sold off, I never had one complaint or problem. I build mine to hold up and to work very well. If I am not happy with it, I make it right. I would put up my builds against any similar factory ARs.


I also agree.  If anything, my builds are MORE reliable than factory rifles because I get the right buffer and buffer-spring combos to optimize reliability as opposed to a big-name manufacturer that just throws in an H buffer and standard carbine spring.
Link Posted: 3/23/2015 1:39:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2015 1:45:16 PM EDT by CavScout8]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jonwienke:


Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.

It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.
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Originally Posted By jonwienke:
Originally Posted By CavScout8:
I'd still recommend building one at some point in the future, but builds SHOULDN'T be your go-to weapons (generally speaking).


Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.

It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.



That's BS. Those people are TRAINED, a LOT, and do it a LOT. They're also theones doing it for a pay check. Exact same thing, buy from a manufacturer. The pro's know what they're doing, and many or most here don't.

Honestly, you all agree because you built yours and don't want to think for a second that you made the wrong choice or that gun that you wrapped up so much money into might not be 100%.

Your builds MIGHT be good to go, but most would have parts coming loose and/or breaking if they were used hard. I know everyone here has over 1k though every AR they have.... but many builds and configurations here are borderline functional. Even if I didn't care what industry pro's and others say, all I have to do is look in here at all the issue threads.
Link Posted: 3/23/2015 1:49:49 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By CavScout8:

That's BS. Those people are TRAINED, a LOT, and do it a LOT. They're also theones doing it for a pay check. Exact same thing, buy from a manufacturer. The pro's know what they're doing, and many or most here don't.
Honestly, you all agree because you built yours and don't want to think for a second that you made the wrong choice or that gun that you wrapped up so much money into might not be 100%.
Your builds MIGHT be good to go, but most would have parts coming loose and/or breaking if they were used hard. I know everyone here has over 1k though every AR they have.... but many builds and configurations here are borderline functional. Even if I didn't care what industry pro's and others say, all I have to do is look in here at all the issue threads.
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Originally Posted By CavScout8:
Originally Posted By jonwienke:
Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.
It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.

That's BS. Those people are TRAINED, a LOT, and do it a LOT. They're also theones doing it for a pay check. Exact same thing, buy from a manufacturer. The pro's know what they're doing, and many or most here don't.
Honestly, you all agree because you built yours and don't want to think for a second that you made the wrong choice or that gun that you wrapped up so much money into might not be 100%.
Your builds MIGHT be good to go, but most would have parts coming loose and/or breaking if they were used hard. I know everyone here has over 1k though every AR they have.... but many builds and configurations here are borderline functional. Even if I didn't care what industry pro's and others say, all I have to do is look in here at all the issue threads.

I've bought complete ARs and built a few as well. The ones I've built have run 100% and are my "go to" rifles. I can't say the same for the ones I've bought complete.

Link Posted: 3/23/2015 2:36:27 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By M4A1Carbine:

I've bought complete ARs and built a few as well. The ones I've built have run 100% and are my "go to" rifles. I can't say the same for the ones I've bought complete.

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Originally Posted By M4A1Carbine:
Originally Posted By CavScout8:
Originally Posted By jonwienke:
Nonsense. If you know what you're doing, you can build a gun that's just as reliable as anything made by a name-brand manufacturer. The big guys build guns for a paycheck. You're building a gun to save your ass. If you're competent, the gun you build is probably going to be assembled more carefully and tested more thoroughly than a factory build.
It's the same motivation to excel that applies when you have to pack your own parachute.

That's BS. Those people are TRAINED, a LOT, and do it a LOT. They're also theones doing it for a pay check. Exact same thing, buy from a manufacturer. The pro's know what they're doing, and many or most here don't.
Honestly, you all agree because you built yours and don't want to think for a second that you made the wrong choice or that gun that you wrapped up so much money into might not be 100%.
Your builds MIGHT be good to go, but most would have parts coming loose and/or breaking if they were used hard. I know everyone here has over 1k though every AR they have.... but many builds and configurations here are borderline functional. Even if I didn't care what industry pro's and others say, all I have to do is look in here at all the issue threads.

I've bought complete ARs and built a few as well. The ones I've built have run 100% and are my "go to" rifles. I can't say the same for the ones I've bought complete.



Shoot you're builds past 1k rds, for real, and see. They may still be 100%, but odds aren't so great. Yes, people here CAN and DO do it right, but not most. Better test, put it on an Army firing line for 1-2k rds.

You need to buy from better companies. Every other person on here as an issue with their enonomy rifle, built in a shop/factory.
Link Posted: 3/23/2015 2:40:49 PM EDT
Another thing that has become popular here...

Spending the least amount of money to get blems and seconds labelled as blems, for every single major functioning part.

Then they come through and put a $120 Sig brace, a $200 FF handguard/rail, $50-150 stock, and at least $100 in other parts for looks basically.

Oh, and then under $200-300 for an optic. Granded, I wouldn't pay much for an optic for a weapon like that, but I wouldn't keep the weapon either.
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