Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 8/17/2005 11:37:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 11:37:46 AM EDT by NevadaARshooter]
I am thinking about going back to plain old gun oil (such as Hoppes). It seems like Break Free, used as a lube, evaporates too quickly. Other oils seem to stay in place for a long time. Opinions?
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:58:37 AM EDT
For cleaning I use dedicated solvents like Shooter's Choice, Butch's Bore Shine, etc.
For lubricating I use a dedicated lubricant. Personally I use a good quality motor oil.
When heavier lube is appropriate I use a gun grease (Tetra Gun Grease ).
When a protectant is needed Iuse a long-term metal-protecting storage product MP-hd

Using CLP is a lot better than nothing at all. However, it can't be as good a solvent as solvents are. It can't do as well at lubricating as lubricants can, and it can't protect as wel las protectants can.

CLP may do everything fairly well, but does nothing extremely well.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:04:32 PM EDT
I agree with HB. I use Hoppes solvent and Rem oil for lubrication.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:21:48 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:39:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HBruns:
CLP may do everything fairly well, but does nothing extremely well.



Yep.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:41:05 PM EDT
Stay with the Breakfree, very good product.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 1:37:26 PM EDT
Spot-on Hapjack. Breakfree all the way. It has a Mil-spec # for a reason. I wish more people I know could understand this.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 1:41:20 PM EDT
I have used breakfree on everything I have ever owned, and it never failed me for any reason.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 8:30:45 PM EDT
Breakfree works extremely well for protection from corrosion. Much better than many dedicated protectants. The solvent portion of CLP lubes also helps in keeping the carbon, that is deposited in the receiver on AR-15's, from gumming up, leading to better reliability under high round counts.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 10:48:25 PM EDT
BF is good to wipe down the outside of your rifle but it is does not have very good lubricating properties. I have found many other dedicated lubricants to be far superior to CLP for lubricating.

SHTF day... sure I would take BF CLP but last time I checked I was not at war, nor has SHTF day arrived yet so I will use dedicated chems and get the job done right.
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 3:09:33 AM EDT
If your firearms jams due to break free. The problem is your firearms and not break free.

Ever wonder why just about every other oil clp manuf compares there item to break free.
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 3:14:36 AM EDT
I'm a breakfree convert, love the 16 oz aeresol cans. I field strip my guns just before shooting them, spray with breakfree, give a quick wipe of the bolt, then mist with breakfree again and then then shoot.

Starting to love the smell of it too!
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 3:38:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/20/2005 2:38:57 AM EDT by wrecktech]

Originally Posted By APTECH77:
Breakfree all the way. It has a Mil-spec # for a reason. I wish more people I know could understand this.

I must disagree. LSA has a Mil-spec number too. Break-free does three jobs with one product. However it doesn't do all of them well. If it did, then we would not need Sweet's or cosmoline. My .02....

Nevada, find a product YOU think works for you and use that. If you are happy with Break-free, FP-10, Rem-oil, Mili-tec or motor oil, GREAT! Use it regularly and your gun will love you for it.
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 1:42:28 PM EDT
The way I understand it is, C = Cleaner, not bore solvent, not copper remover, but does loosen carbon and keeps it in suspension. L = Lubricant, simply reduces friction between moving parts. P = Protectant, stops corrosion. As far as my experience with Breakfree CLP it does everything very well.
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 11:29:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HBruns:
CLP may do everything fairly well, but does nothing extremely well.



Not true.

CLP cleans everything well except copper fouling.
CLP is a good lubricant, but not the best.
CLP is one of the best rust preventatives you can get.

Add them up and it's damn good for an all-in-one.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 10:17:52 AM EDT
I've tried Break Free on my XM16E1 and I'm very satisfied with it. I thought the bolt carrier assembly was already clean when I was still using WD-40 which is good to some extent. But when I started using Break Free, it removed more dirt that the WD-40 wasn't able to get out.

As long as you put a generous amount of Break Free to the M16's moving parts, you won't have a problem with your rifle.P - Preservative
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 11:13:17 PM EDT
wd-40 is not a lubricant
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 9:56:23 AM EDT
BF CLP works well. It may evaporate leaving no visible trace of the oil, but its rust protection is superior to almost everything else on the market save for Eezox and some other non-CLP preservatives. Walmart sells BF CLP in aerosol cans at a good price, so good that I just spray it into a small oil dispenser to conserve CLP usage.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 4:44:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/23/2005 4:53:21 PM EDT by rch]

Originally Posted By slider713:
wd-40 is not a lubricant



I checked the WD-40 website at www.wd40.com and it says that WD-40 "cleans, protects, penetrates, LUBRICATES, and displaces moisture..."

According to WD-40, it was developed for the aerospace industry, and Convair was the first to use it to prevent corrosion on the outer skin of the Atlas Missile.

It's readily available almost anywhere, even at drugstores and convenience stores.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 5:08:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 5:21:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rch:

Originally Posted By slider713:
wd-40 is not a lubricant



I checked the WD-40 website at www.wd40.com and it says that WD-40 "cleans, protects, penetrates, LUBRICATES, and displaces moisture..."

According to WD-40, it was developed for the aerospace industry, and Convair was the first to use it to prevent corrosion on the outer skin of the Atlas Missile.

It's readily available almost anywhere, even at drugstores and convenience stores.



WD40 = kerosene in a can
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:49:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/24/2005 5:50:43 PM EDT by rch]

Originally Posted By Dave_A:

Originally Posted By rch:

Originally Posted By slider713:
wd-40 is not a lubricant



I checked the WD-40 website at www.wd40.com and it says that WD-40 "cleans, protects, penetrates, LUBRICATES, and displaces moisture..."

According to WD-40, it was developed for the aerospace industry, and Convair was the first to use it to prevent corrosion on the outer skin of the Atlas Missile.

It's readily available almost anywhere, even at drugstores and convenience stores.hr


WD40 = kerosene in a can



Taken from the WD40 (FAQ) website:

What does WD-40 contain?
While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

Link Posted: 8/24/2005 6:13:43 PM EDT
WD40=water based crap, used BF clp for many years in all my weapons, hasn't failed me yet.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 9:47:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dilligaff:
WD40=water based crap...


Where, in God's universe, do you come up with such patently absurd nonsense?
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 10:22:12 PM EDT
I use break free for all my needs except the occasional bore srcub. I love it.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 7:37:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 12:03:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/25/2005 12:04:39 PM EDT by dilligaff]
nvm
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 12:05:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By romulus:

Originally Posted By dilligaff:
WD40=water based crap...


Where, in God's universe, do you come up with such patently absurd nonsense?


Then go ahead and us it on YOUR weapons.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 1:44:52 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 3:31:26 PM EDT
I don't use WD40 on my firearms for either lubing or protecting. I occasionally use it for some light cleaning, but primarily as a demoisturant. In that application it's a legendary product, a superb product in fact, and as American as apple pie.

It's a great water displacer, it has no water in it, it's an enemy of water, it's immiscible in water...lord, where do these urban legends start?
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 4:45:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HeavyMetal:
WD40 is not water based. It is okay for a light duty lubricant and rust preventative used in non life threatning applications. I use it on hinges, wheelbarrows, etc because it is cheap.

Break Free is a much more heavy duty synthetic base lubricant. It goes on the AR's.



You're exactly right! How can WD-40 be water-based when it's supposed to displace water or moisture? Hahahaha! I use both WD-40 and Break Free CLP, and I see nothing wrong with both products. I suggest those who criticize a product (not just WD-40) do a research first before doing so.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 8:58:03 PM EDT
Once again, WD 40 is not a lubricant. I am in the aerospace industry, and we don't use that. However what it does do is a great rust preventative and cleaner, but if u use it on anything that has grease or lub. on it already, it will remove it for you and leave that thing dry. If you are going to lubricate anything around the house, hinges, whatever, use a silicone based lub, like something that 3M makes, they are the best. For an example, go spray wd 40 on ur moto or bike chain and watch what happens.... dry as the desert. .... ok, my hands hurt now.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 9:03:48 PM EDT
And to another reply I saw, to answer your question... WD 40 is a petroleum based product, so much like kerosene or gasoline... Does it lubricate, YES, but not for long, and I sure as hell wouldn't use it on a firearm... hense the word "petroleum"... It is quite flammable and not a good place to be where there is combustion going on... Hope that helps.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 9:13:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/25/2005 9:15:04 PM EDT by Pistonman]
I stored handguns and rifles in a cheap sheetmetal safe in an outdoor garage for five years.
Every few months I sprayed them with WD-40, sometimes six months apart.
When I took them out of storage, cleaned with BF CLP, they look as new.
And no I was not in prison.
Edit to add: They were damn gooey when I cleaned them.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 7:30:22 AM EDT
Depends on the weapon. I use clp to hose out the upper and bolt carrier, sure, it's great for cleaning. If I'm only going to be fooling around at the range, that is usually good enough, but if I'm going to be doing something all day with a high round count, I put my trust in something a little more substantial: Castrol Syntech 50w. The BreakFree is fine, but it dries up fast; doesn't have much "staying power." On pistols I use either Syntech 50w or ProShot ProGold when I want grease. (about the consistency of vaseline)
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:41:29 AM EDT
vasoline????hock.gif
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 2:51:03 AM EDT
i read way back some where" think it was a mag"that the best way to use bfclp

was to cleean weap the lub all your parts then let it sit for 24 hrs for the product to cure

it would look dry but actually left a lubracating film on the parts...

iam not 100% positive on this but pretty sure.
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 8:18:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By slider713:
Once again, WD 40 is not a lubricant. I am in the aerospace industry, and we don't use that. However what it does do is a great rust preventative and cleaner, but if u use it on anything that has grease or lub. on it already, it will remove it for you and leave that thing dry.hr


Yup, WD-40 is a good cleaner, that it removes grease or lube from a part, but it doesn't leave it dry. It leaves a coating even if it looks dry. This was taken from the WD-40 website at www.wd40.com:

How long does WD-40 last after application?
While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of WD-40 for maximum protection.

And one more thing. WD-40 is very popular with aircraft mechanics. Your company may not use WD-40, but I've seen WD-40 cans in almost every aircraft mechanic's toolbox.

I'm not defending the product. Just stating the facts.

Link Posted: 8/27/2005 9:02:10 PM EDT
wd-40 is not a great rust prevent. there are much better products out there. What wd is good for say you drop your shotgun in the water while goose hunting, hose it down with wd, or starters and spark plug wires on trucks after getting swamped. I have found like stated above wd promotes rust.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 9:40:01 AM EDT
Not to compare WD-40 to Break Free by any means...but I used WD-40 for several years on my weapons and never saw a spot of rust.Reason I started using it was due to the recommendations from my elders.We were getting the weapons rain soaked at times and the WD-40 would run the water right off.
That said I can say for a fact keep the WD-40 away from orings and seals such as found in scopes.It will penetrate scopes and fog them out.If you use it in the action as alube clean the weapon often.WD-40 mixes with powder residues and when heated turns into a gummy mess.Trust me,I had two Remingtons(742 and Mod.4) stop running due to this.
The WD-40 is very helpful when it comes to getting water out of electronics.Ive had to hose out my distributor and caps with WD-40 after drowning out in water crossings.Stuff works as it should for its intended purpose.
But It aint Break Free CLP.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 1:24:15 PM EDT
Rch,
I too am in aviation and I have to disagree. I see few/ if any mech that use WD-40. Why? It is crap that should be left at home for the occasional sticker removal, gum removal, stuck hinges, tar/ grime removal, etc....I have been in aviation a long time and have NOT seen it all, but I can tell you I don't see WD-40 being used. If you want a good penetrating oil, use something like Aerokroil or PB Blaster. In aviation lubrication we use things more like Boeshield, LPS 1,2,3, ZEP Chem products , Dow Corning products or some airlines use 3M products. All are aviation specific. Things of this nature have what is called a MIL-SPEC number. That means it has been approved by military/ aviation industry standards FAR's (Federal Aviation Regulations) for usage on aircraft. Let's remember planes operate in temp extremes from -70/120+ deg Far. Airlines AMM's (aircraft maintenance manual) calls out for specific products to be used in specific job applications. These products have been tested, studied, analyzed and approved for the application for which they are intended, hence they are given a MIL-SPEC number. If that exact product cannot be used, an EQUIVALENT MIL-SPEC product is called out for. As far as I know, WD-40 does not have a MIL-SPEC number and if for some reason it does, the aviation industry has found better products to use in its place. If you need to use something for corrosion prevention, products like CorrosionX, LPS 3, Nox-Rust or are good products to use. Break-free is given a MIL-SPEC number of MIL-L-63460 for its ability to clean, lubricate, and protect (CLP). Other products that have a MIL-SPEC number have been approved for what they're designed usage is. I'm not saying Break-Free is the only MIL-SPEC product out there, but it is recognized gun industry-wide as a good CLP. WD-40 IMO will not stand up to the demands of a firearm's violent mechanical action. That is why I will not use it in my firearms. Break-Free CLP is what I choose to use to clean, lubricate, and protect. For long time storage after I clean my firearms, I coat them with a light coating of RIG grease, Tropix, or some sort of Cosmoline. Hope this helps. Just my $ .02
Link Posted: 8/29/2005 7:09:45 AM EDT
slider713-->
yeah, good on carry weapons because it does not run out of the gun like oil and stain/soak through your clothes. slows down the cycling of the gun noticeably, though, so it doesn't get used during competitions.
Link Posted: 8/29/2005 7:45:53 AM EDT
WD-40 is a poor corrosion inhibitor. It had the same amount of protection as Militec-1, FP-10, and Slip 2000 CLP in my testing.

BF CLP may not be a very good lube, but it cleans and protects at a low cost and is readily available.
Link Posted: 8/29/2005 11:43:07 AM EDT
RCH----->
I have seen it around the shop, as it should be, it is a great product, but I would imagine it has specific use. And like I saw mentioned above, CorrosionX is a great product, so are Zep chemicals. I still just wouldn't use it on my firearm, as also mentioned above and a good point I might add, wd40 is a great dirt attractant and will gum up just about anything. Much like CLP, wd40 doesn't do any one thing great, but does them all well.
Link Posted: 8/29/2005 5:47:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:54:16 PM EDT
The WD STANDS FOR ........................ WATER DISPLACEMENT... just to clear that fact up.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 12:24:11 AM EDT
I use BreakFree CLP ALMOST exclusivly. I think it works fine. However it does poorly in cleaning shotgun bores. My guess is because of the plastic fouling and heavy leading shotgun barrels are subject to. Other then BF and some Eds Red I was given, I have no need for other products.

In my opinion WD-40 sucks, except for automotive and home use aplications.
The thing somebody posted earlier about bike chains is quite true. I often use WD to degrease my bike
(hubs, chain, stubborn rusty parts) before relubing with a quality grease.

YMMV
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 6:31:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By muddawggin:
I have used breakfree on everything I have ever owned, and it never failed me for any reason.




Same here
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 6:36:33 PM EDT
Correct me if I'm wrong, I have noticed if the AR is stored for 30-60 days
the bolt gets sticky/ gummy. Is this Fl humidity or my beloved CLP?
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:02:33 AM EDT
Could be a mixture of both. I have dies still dripping in clp that have been stred in a ammo can for over 2 years with no sign of gumming up.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 8:20:18 AM EDT
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top