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Posted: 6/17/2009 2:57:50 PM EST
I've heard that getting a barrel fluted changes the shape of the rifling and makes the rifling pressure on the bullet inconsistent as it goes down the length of the barrel.

Any truth to this? Thanks.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 3:08:16 PM EST
It can, if it's done carelessly.

With care, lots of coolant and shallow cuts, it's fine.

I have seen a Remington VSF that was a little bigger under the flutes, but hey, that's Remington for you.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 3:49:33 PM EST
fuck that shit then I ain't getting anything fluted
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 4:02:43 PM EST
It helps when you use tape to help the dremel cut straight. Also remember to change the blades often.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 4:04:51 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 4:10:41 PM EST
I'm hesitant to do anything to the profile of a barrel once it's no longer a blank. Shorten or re-crown, ok. Change profile, very iffy. A gunsmith in this area toasted a barrel for a .505 Gibbs changing it's contour. This was his own rifle. I'd imagine he was very careful as it was an odd caliber going onto a Brevex (VERY, rare) action. He will not do this type of work and that was 30 some years ago.

While somewhat expensive, barrels are cheaper than paying to get one ruined and having to find = wait for a replacement. Just build another upper, you'll save $

ZRM is correct. If you're set on doing this to your barrel. Use lots of coolant. And go slow.
458
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 4:20:44 PM EST
I'll be fluting a stick tomorrow.

If anyone's interested, I'll take some pictures.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 4:31:30 PM EST
I'm contemplating it, I'd send it to ADCO if I were to get it done.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 5:28:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By monkey302:
I've heard that getting a barrel fluted changes the shape of the rifling and makes the rifling pressure on the bullet inconsistent as it goes down the length of the barrel.

Any truth to this? Thanks.
When removing material from the exterior of a barrel one of two things will happen to varying degrees. A typical American manufactured barrel, bored and button rifled, will experience some slight expansion of the bore diameter. It will mirror the barrel profile. A cold hammer forged barrel will experience the reverse, a slight contraction of the bore diameter, it will again mirror the profile. This occurs due to the stresses imposed during the manufacturing process. A slight tightening of the bore in the muzzle area has proven helpful in regard to accuracy. And the opposite will usually occur. Two of the principle reasons for the accuracy of bull barrels is the profile and the favorable slenderness ratio of the barrel. Take note of some of the hyper-accurate, hyper expensive 22 rimfire target rifles, they increase in diameter at the muzzle area to provide some tightening of the bore.


Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:18:41 PM EST
ZRM
I'm more than interested. Post the pic's if you can. Too me it's seems like making the splines on an axle but they don't travel it's length. I don't know how the barrel can keep from warping with each cut, unless they're all done at the same time.
Thanks for the info.
458
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