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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 12/17/2005 6:40:48 PM EDT
Thought I'd share a little experience. To make a long story short, I accidentally baked an A2 buttstock and an Ergo grip at 350 degrees for an hour and a half! I was curing a thermo epoxy (gunkote) and was supposed to be at 175. Anyway, the Ergo grip I thought for sure was a goner. It came out perfect, except that the adhesive that holds the name medallion melted. The grip was not even soft! The A2 buttstock had a minor crack in the foam in the storage area, maybe an air pocket exploded. Otherwise it was perfect as well. I also, intentionally baked a Glock frame at 200 degrees for two hours, perfect. The Gunkote from Brownell's cured very well at the lower temps (300 degrees for an hour is recommended) and is durable as hell. I've used Duracoat as well, the Gunkote resists wear much better. I can't chip the Gunkote on the Glock, abrading it is very hard too (tried inside the dustcover). Anyway, AR plastic handles baking very well, thankfully!


Celeritas, Impetus, Violentia
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 6:49:31 PM EDT
Good to hear it came out alright!

Firearms get quite warm when they are fired repeatedly.

G

Link Posted: 12/17/2005 7:07:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By glock23carry:
Good to hear it came out alright!

Firearms get quite warm when they are fired repeatedly.

G





Stocks and pistol grips usually don't get all that warm when getting fired....
Link Posted: 12/24/2005 1:27:06 AM EDT
I've worked in injection molding, and now in plastics extrusion...

FYI:
Our melt temps are usually around 550 to 620...

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