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Posted: 9/29/2004 1:24:00 PM EST
I have several uppers, 2 in particular that I hardly ever shoot. Is it so wrong to share the b/c/ch between them?
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 1:30:17 PM EST
As a general rule you shouldnt. useing the same carrier is fine, but I would have seperate bolts which where marked for each upper. JMHO

Link Posted: 9/29/2004 1:40:39 PM EST
I think this has been beaten to death- but I have not read everything written here about it. What I do have to add is a question.

When your bolt that is "worn" in to your barrel extension (upper) through normal use wears out what do you do? Buy a new upper to go with your new bolt?

I doubt it- I imagine I could be wrong though. I can see where it certainly makes sense to run the same set-up all the time from a mechanical standpoint (read that can't hurt), but just in thinking about it, it seems like voodoo to me to not be able to switch bolts. I thought the industrial revolution covered the whole interchangeable parts thing? Somebody please answer my question and give me a pass on the clue bus- inquiring minds want to know!

Link Posted: 9/29/2004 2:01:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 2:02:50 PM EST by texashark]
I've built and/or tested headspace in about 10 different rifles with an RCBS headspace gauge, and go/no go gauges.

I've never had a headspace problem with any bolt I've tested, including

Colt/Bushmaster/E.A./DPMS.

I've swapped bolts and carriers and never had a problem, or had the headspace check excessive.

So....I can generally say you'd be ok with any reputable setup. YMMV.



edited for speeling.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 2:12:53 PM EST
I have. I dont worry about it since I read a thread where a military armorer said they mix bolts and rifles all the time by the hundreds.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 2:20:00 PM EST
As far as I know, the only problem would be with a severly worn bolt or barrel extension. As long as everything is within spec, it should all function together.

As a rule I try to avoid it, but then again, every time I get a new upper, I wind up getting a new lower shortly thereafter.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 2:37:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
I have. I dont worry about it since I read a thread where a military armorer said they mix bolts and rifles all the time by the hundreds.

While in theory the 24&P says it is a NoNo to mix bolts, in practice, it happens all the time!
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 2:54:32 PM EST
FWIW, a buddy with at least 3 different 16 lowers at any given time runs one b/bc/ch with at least 4 uppers and has done so for years/I'd guess 50k to 100k rounds without the benefit of any gauges. I run one assembly with 3 different uppers. I've never run into anyone at an EmmaGee shoot that suggested we ought to do otherwise.

It's hard to argue against caution, though.

Sam
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 3:03:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 3:15:48 PM EST by Tweak]
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:12:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By Tweak:
I use one b/bc/ch in 4 uppers, HS is identical on gages. Never been a problem. Sam routinely swaps bolts and barrels.


Originally Posted By GUNGUY1911:
While in theory the 24&P says it is a NoNo to mix bolts, in practice, it happens all the time!



Care to point out the page number in the 23&P where that is written? The headspacing section is very specific.

Yeah fat fingered that, I may have misspoke about the 23&P, but it was in an ARMY pub, I am going through my old stuff, when I find it I will post it.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 9:43:58 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 1:20:45 AM EST
So swapping is a definate maybe.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 1:54:04 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 2:00:39 AM EST
At $100/carrier group I don't see any reason why you'd need/want to. Guys with 10 uppers and only 1 bolt? C'mon. Hell, I'm looking at having (eventually) at least 1 extra bolt for each rifle. But then again, I'm the kind of guy that thinks of a stripped lower as spare parts.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 2:30:25 AM EST
Maybe that old Reagan phrase would be appropriate?

"Trust, but verify.."

If you're going to have a bunch of uppers, and only one or two bolts, or even a bunch of bolts and uppers that might get mixed up, maybe a headspace gauge would be a smart or cautious investment?

Remember, Murphy was an optimist.



Lonny
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 10:09:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2004 10:13:32 AM EST by ramseyj]
If all barrels are within spec and the bolt is within spec there is no safety problem with mixing. It's a wear issue. Remember that "In Spec." can very by as much as .006, and where the difference will get you is on the locking lugs. A new rifle and bolt will go through a break-in period (just like a car engine) of a few thousand rounds before the lugs have worn in. Once broken in all six lugs will share the load evenly, and wear evenly from then on. If you then place that bolt in another AR the lugs will not all mate evenly, some will be tighter than others. The bolt will then start another break-in period until the tighter lugs have worn down and all six are once again sharing the load evenly. On and on this goes each time you move the bolt to a new rifle. It will shorten the over all life of the bolt and the lugs on the barrel. How much it will shorten it depends on how often you switch them around. Remember, the guys in the military armory’s don't have to pay for the replacement parts when they wear out, we do. I have 2 uppers 2 bolts and 1 carrier. I figured it was cheaper to buy 1 bolt now than, to buy 1 bolt and 2 new barrels later.

Link Posted: 9/30/2004 11:51:29 AM EST
I do. <knock wood> no trouble.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 12:29:31 PM EST

What I can't understand is what people who sell their used uppers without the bolt (& carrier) do with the bolts. It's all over the EE. I can understand holding on to the carrier, but for the bolts - what gives?
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 2:32:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2004 2:33:16 PM EST by h8mtv]

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:
What I can't understand is what people who sell their used uppers without the bolt (& carrier) do with the bolts. It's all over the EE. I can understand holding on to the carrier, but for the bolts - what gives?



One of life's great mysteries.
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 8:41:21 PM EST
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