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Posted: 8/27/2004 8:16:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/27/2004 8:18:38 AM EST by JimmyThompson]
1.) For barrel installation how much should be used?
2.) FSB and Gas Tube, should some be applied to it won't be a bitch to get out?
3.) FSB and Barrel, how about between these two parts?

Thanks for the info'
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 9:56:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/27/2004 9:57:14 AM EST by Apple_Tech]
Molybdenum Disulfide is what you want. Bushmaster has it for $7.95/1oz jar. But the best place to get it is go down to your local auto parts store. It's used for breakpads, it's the anti-seizing grease that comes w/ most of them plus they should have it over the counter for like $2-$3.

now for application.
1) barrel install: a thin coat on the barrel (smooth part) then put a bit on the threads of the upper.

2) FSB and Gas Tube: You can use some but it won't make it any easier to remove the gas tube later because that is carbon build up around the gas tube. the moly will make it easy to install but not remove.

3) FSB and Barrel: a thin coat will do. Some barrels are not parked under the FSB because the FSB is installed before the finishing process. a light coat never hurts.

4) Use it anywhere you feel, it doesn't hurt a thing.

Just remember if you get it from the autoparts store not to get universal anti-seize grease (it's a aluminum/copper powerder in a grease form) Get the Molybdenum Disufide (MoS2) for breaks application. It should say on the pack somewhere.

Hope that helps.
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 12:51:54 PM EST
UH........What if I did get the other stuff, would it hurt? Its got a silver metallic look to it from NAPA-Anti-Sieze Lubricant #765-1674
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 4:21:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/27/2004 4:21:45 PM EST by bigkracka]
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 3:17:55 AM EST
Do not put grease or antiseize on the gas tube. The tube gets quite hot and it will cook the grease to carbon, making future removal quite difficult.

DO NOT USE antiseize compounds, that is, greases containing metal particles, that silver or copper colored stuff, for barrel assembly. Those are intended for steel on steel or iron, such as cylinder head bolts, bolts on water pumps, etc. The softer aluminum or copper particles work fine against the steel.

But for steel on aluminum, such as the barrel nut on the softer aluminum AR-15 receiver, it embeds the aluminum particles in the aluminum of the receiver threads.

Do not use grease containing graphite. It can have corrosion problems with aluminum.

JUST USE GREASE. Ordinary wheel bearing grease usually has moly in it. This is nothing special, common item. Lacking that, grease such as is used in a grease gun is just fine.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 8:09:32 AM EST
How do you know if it has graphite in it? The grease I used (Coastal Industrial Moly EP) has does not say 'graphite' on it anywhere, but it has a deep black color. I wrote the manufacturer, but they did not answer.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 5:20:06 PM EST
Moly is deep gray.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 10:26:15 AM EST
Could someone do a parts check for me:

NAPA-Anti-Sieze Lubricant Part Number #765-1674

Please let me know if this stuff is ok for my AR-15.....thanks'
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 2:28:22 PM EST
Just looking it up online...

OK, Jimmy, the stuff you have, you said it is silver in color, contains powedered aluminum. No, do not use that. Sorry.

When you put cylinder heads on your car, install a water pump, lube the bendix on the starter, you can use the anti sieze stuff... just not on your AR-15.

Do you have a grease gun? Squirt out a little on your finger and use that on the barrel nut and receiver threads.

Use the same grease on the threads of your flash hider.

Don't use grease anywhere else on the AR-15.

Put the gas tube on dry.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 9:47:59 PM EST
POOP!


DO NOT USE antiseize compounds, that is, greases containing metal particles, that silver or copper colored stuff, for barrel assembly. Those are intended for steel on steel or iron, such as cylinder head bolts, bolts on water pumps, etc. The softer aluminum or copper particles work fine against the steel.



I just put a barrel on tonight and used the High Temp Nickel antiseize

I guess I will be taking it back apart and cleaning it off.

Oh well I could use the practice.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 8:13:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By GC456:
POOP!


DO NOT USE antiseize compounds, that is, greases containing metal particles, that silver or copper colored stuff, for barrel assembly. Those are intended for steel on steel or iron, such as cylinder head bolts, bolts on water pumps, etc. The softer aluminum or copper particles work fine against the steel.



I just put a barrel on tonight and used the High Temp Nickel antiseize

I guess I will be taking it back apart and cleaning it off.

Oh well I could use the practice.



Update: I fixed the problem And I was much faster this time.. only took about 15 minutes
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:02:58 PM EST
Hey all is Moly EP Grease ok to use for the threads of the reciever when replacing the barrel it does not say anything about having graphite and it is lithium based.

Thanks

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 3:14:41 PM EST
I checked with my local Exxon/Mobil distributor and got a free sample in a tub that will last me forever.

Tub is same size as typical wheel bearing grease sized container.

A little dab will do ya.

Danny
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 6:07:30 AM EST
GITrinec

Yess
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 8:55:23 AM EST

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
Do not put grease or antiseize on the gas tube. The tube gets quite hot and it will cook the grease to carbon, making future removal quite difficult.

DO NOT USE antiseize compounds, that is, greases containing metal particles, that silver or copper colored stuff, for barrel assembly. Those are intended for steel on steel or iron, such as cylinder head bolts, bolts on water pumps, etc. The softer aluminum or copper particles work fine against the steel.

But for steel on aluminum, such as the barrel nut on the softer aluminum AR-15 receiver, it embeds the aluminum particles in the aluminum of the receiver threads.

Do not use grease containing graphite. It can have corrosion problems with aluminum.

JUST USE GREASE. Ordinary wheel bearing grease usually has moly in it. This is nothing special, common item. Lacking that, grease such as is used in a grease gun is just fine.



Could you please tell us where you got that info? Please check the info or call the manufacturer. The information you gave above is completely false. The metallic anti-sieze mentioned above is not limited to steel but can be used on other metals as well.....

It will not turn to carbon and in fact has a higher burning point than moly.

Let's not guess, let's know....
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 4:26:32 PM EST
armax: "Could you please tell us where you got that info? Please check the info or call the manufacturer. The information you gave above is completely false. The metallic anti-sieze mentioned above is not limited to steel but can be used on other metals as well.....

It will not turn to carbon and in fact has a higher burning point than moly.

Let's not guess, let's know...."

From about 30 years experience using these materials in a variety of uses, not just firearms. I use NeverSieze and comparable metallic anti-sieze materials on a daily basis. It is gritty, not slippery.

The purpose of putting grease on the barrel nut is to allow it to make up easily. The purpose of anti-sieze materials is to allow a chance of breaking loose bolts that have been subjected to corrosive materials, and rusting together.

I have used these materials in automotive, industrial diesels, marine environments (that is boats and ships in salt water), etc. I am well aware of what these materials do.

I have written some manuals used in my industry.

I have also built AR-15's and other firearms for as many years.

But what do I know?
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 4:47:45 PM EST
Maybe you could explain to us how the metallic anti-sieze lube breaks down unlike molly as you claim. I'm a chemical engineer (earned my degree at NMSU) and am currently employed at Applied Materials. Your claims have no other scientific or empirical basis other than "because I said so". I'm just asking for a scientific explanation for your claim (as you seemed to offer a psuedo-scientific explanation in your first post). Your claims are news to me as well as most in the chemical industry. Not trying to sound brash, but a simply rational explanation would be nice.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:45:33 PM EST
Tell you what, you put whatever you want on your AR-15, I'll continue to use what I have found works well over the last 30 years.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 6:23:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
Tell you what, you put whatever you want on your AR-15, I'll continue to use what I have found works well over the last 30 years.



I take it that you don't have a rational explanation. I agree with ya, To each their own..
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 6:46:58 PM EST
Bottom line.... it really wont make that much difference.

On barrel threads, TM calls for Moly Grease. I'm gonna use Moly Grease. But I wouldnt freak if I used anti-seize.... or nothing for that matter. Whatever is handy. Just dont want any galling.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 11:10:38 PM EST
Exxon Moly-Di----in the grease gun tube---at Auto Zone----for less than $3 -----is all you need-----will last for more AR's than you could ever afford to make.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 9:52:57 AM EST
armax, I thought I explained it several times, in plain language.
Link Posted: 9/4/2004 6:33:17 AM EST
The bottom line is that the military has both anti-seize and moly grease in the system. they can use either, or neither. They have been using the M16 weapon system for over 40 years, so like it or not THEY are the experts on the weapon. THEY have decided that moly grease is the ticket for the barrel nut and buffer tube. If you don't believe it, read the TM manual. If you don't like it, take it up with them.

As for Jimmy Thompson's question I wrote in a previous discussion "I just received confirmation from Valvoline that their Moly-Fortified Multi-Purpose grease, part # 632, does NOT contain any graphite. I didn't think it did, but thought I would check before passing the info along. I buy mine at NAPA." YMMV.
Link Posted: 9/4/2004 9:08:29 AM EST
A tub of Sta-Lube "Disc Brake High Temp Wheel Bearing Grease" is all you need.

It's 100% Molybdenum Disulfide grease that will withstand higher temperatures then the common types of grease you usually find in a grease gun cartridge.

The tub costs a little under $4.00.
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