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Page AR-15 » Ammunition
AR Sponsor: bravocompany
Posted: 2/17/2024 7:31:51 PM EDT
Looking to store some ammo in 50 cal cans with older gaskets. Several older posts here said silicon spray e.g. liquid wrench is good to go. An old post on m14forums said even the vapors will degrade the primers.

What's the consensus on this? Thanks in advance
Link Posted: 2/17/2024 7:59:32 PM EDT
[#1]
Where are we storing our ammunition?

Mine is in climate controlled living quarters, inside serviceable ammo cans.    Junky ammo cans are in the garage for storing nuts and bolts.

If you think it is necessary a very light film of petroleum jelly is what I would suggest, but since the ammunition is worth much more than the can, I would retire and replace any cans that do not pass inspection.
Link Posted: 2/17/2024 8:29:58 PM EDT
[#2]
Respectfully, this is out of scope. The question is specific to spray silicon, ammo cans and ammunition.
Link Posted: 2/17/2024 10:38:25 PM EDT
[#3]
If you're looking to revive the gaskets, use balistol, it won't harm the ammo either.
Link Posted: 2/17/2024 10:41:37 PM EDT
[#4]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
If you're looking to revive the gaskets, use balistol, it won't harm the ammo either.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
If you're looking to revive the gaskets, use balistol, it won't harm the ammo either.


Quoted:
Respectfully, this is out of scope. The question is specific to spray silicon, ammo cans and ammunition.

Link Posted: 2/18/2024 1:09:12 AM EDT
[#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
If you're looking to revive the gaskets, use balistol, it won't harm the ammo either.


Quoted:
Respectfully, this is out of scope. The question is specific to spray silicon, ammo cans and ammunition.




Then maybe you should ask in those older posts, eh slick?
Link Posted: 2/18/2024 1:11:35 AM EDT
[#6]
No.
Link Posted: 2/19/2024 1:58:00 AM EDT
[#7]
If I were going to use a silicon spray id spray it into a container and let the distillates evaporate first then use a brush to spread it on the rubber gasket.
Link Posted: 2/19/2024 3:59:35 AM EDT
[#8]
Are you just trying to treat the gaskets? What about removing the lids to treat them and letting them dry before sealing everything? Maybe it's worth asking the silicone spray manufacturer if they have any guidance?
Link Posted: 3/30/2024 1:11:18 PM EDT
[#9]
The correct treatment for post 2001 mil-spec ammo can gaskets (neoprene - was natural rubber before that) is Dow Corning MOLYKOTE® 111 COMPOUND.

Dow Corning MOLYKOTE® 111 COMPOUND
Link Posted: 4/5/2024 1:39:20 AM EDT
[#10]
I've always used Super Lube and it seems to work great.  Also works well on o rings on weapon lights / flashlights
Link Posted: 4/5/2024 5:25:29 AM EDT
[#11]
Quoted:
Where are we storing our ammunition?

Mine is in climate controlled living quarters, inside serviceable ammo cans.    Junky ammo cans are in the garage for storing nuts and bolts.

If you think it is necessary a very light film of petroleum jelly is what I would suggest, but since the ammunition is worth much more than the can, I would retire and replace any cans that do not pass inspection.
View Quote


Do NOT use petroleum jelly on rubber. The hydrocarbons in it actually attack the rubber and deteriorates it.

Unless the seals are actually Viton, which I doubt. Use silicone. I use Sil-Glyde from NAPA, which is 100% silicone.
Link Posted: 4/6/2024 12:39:46 PM EDT
[#12]
Never use any type of petroleum products on the rubber gaskets as it will cause them to deteriorate. I have bought many hundreds of all different sizes of the military ammo cans from Gov Planet & Gov Liquidation when they had the contract. These cans are auctioned out of the military use when empty on pallets with the cans stacked on the outside of the pallet, with the open end facing out & the removed lids thrown in the center, then another pallet is stacked on top of the cans & banded down. The reason for this is not to let anything leave the military possession without multiple inspections. It is easier to inspect a pallet of cans when you can see inside without the work of opening each one.

After getting a trailer of these pallets home, They have be cleaned & dried of any water as they are stored outside. All the lids that come with the cans have the gasketing sprayed down with silicone spray from an aerosol can to prevent them from cracking or tearing as they have been exposed to the environment for many months awaiting the auction. Of the hundreds of ammo cans that I have cleaned & stored, none of the gasketing has failed using this method. Spraying a petroleum product on them will destroy the gasket & the cans designated usage to protect ammo in storage.
Page AR-15 » Ammunition
AR Sponsor: bravocompany
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