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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/30/2004 7:03:52 AM EST
I was wondering if anyone has any experience with this product and has any recomendations or tips regarding this product? I am wanting to re-finish an AR and want to keep the cost down but of course want something that is going to work. The description in the Brownells catalog makes it sound like it is pretty simple to use but I know that you can't always believe the advertisments.

I am looking for any and all advice I can get.

Thanks.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 7:27:56 AM EST
The two tips I can offer regarding the use of Alumahyde is to make sure you clean and degrease the parts to be painted as thoroughly as possible and once painted, wait, wait and wait some more - at least a week before handling to allow the Alumahyde to cure.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 8:20:59 AM EST
I have used Aluma-Hyde II for mags and upper receiver refinishing. Does a good job. I let it air dry 24 hours and then bake in the oven at 250 F for 1.5 to 2 hours. Oil and take it to the range.
Frankly I have found that the DupliColor flat black engine enamel ( 500 F grade) works about as well.

Both are good for refinish but remember they are still just high quality paint systems and will show wear or scratch easier than an anodized finish.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 9:50:51 AM EST
I use it a lot and can highly recommend it. Just make sure you keep acetone and lock-tite away from it even when cured. As mentioned, it takes about a week to fully cure but you can speed up the process by puting in a 90 degree hot-box for two days. I have never seen it mentioned in any Aluma-Hyde II instructions about baking, but if it works...
You must follow the directions completely and allow at least 24 hours before even touching it, more if it is humid. Once cured it is very durable but as with any paint, even the epoxy Aluma-Hyde, it can scratch and chip. Howver, it is very easy to touch up. Sand with 400 gritt or 0000 steel wool to blend the chip/scratch and re-coat, and wait another week. It works on almost anything, plastic, stainless, aluminum, steel, and holds up to heat pretty well on flash suppressors, and there is no need for a primer.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:36:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 11:36:33 AM EST by Zak-Smith]
I've used it to paint Magpul stocks, some mags, and my MRP barrel. It works well.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 9:17:42 PM EST
If you are going to paint your weapon use Norrells Moly Resin. Pre-heat the part, spray the part, bake at 300 for an hour, oil, and good to go. Once cured chemicals will not affect it. You can also do any material that can withstand the oven heat. You can even do plastic or stocks, just bake at 150 for two hours. If the finish is scratched or worn, this stuff can be applied over itself with out stripping. Great stuff.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 9:50:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hateca:
If you are going to paint your weapon use Norrells Moly Resin. Pre-heat the part, spray the part, bake at 300 for an hour, oil, and good to go. Once cured chemicals will not affect it. You can also do any material that can withstand the oven heat. You can even do plastic or stocks, just bake at 150 for two hours. If the finish is scratched or worn, this stuff can be applied over itself with out stripping. Great stuff.



Ok, so where can it be found? Never heard of it before.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 9:56:59 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:59:47 PM EST
Or you could POWDER COAT
Its nearly as hard as chrome plating only it comes in hundreds of colors and finishes .
If you own a Glock or a SOG knife you already own something that’s been powder coated

If you don’t want to buy the equipment , look in the phonebook for powder coating company’s . I had some Porsche wheels done last year for $100 each , Including stripping , smoothing and materials . These were in pretty bad shape to start but turned out like new .
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 5:14:18 AM EST
Thanks for all the great tips. I know that doing the propper prep work is most the battle. I am looking forward to trying this and depending on how well the first attempt goes, was considering going for a camo job. That just might be overstepping my abilities though. I'll have to wait and see.

Thanks again for all the advice.
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 5:56:12 AM EST

The two tips I can offer regarding the use of Alumahyde is to make sure you clean and degrease the parts to be painted as thoroughly as possible and once painted, wait, wait and wait some more - at least a week before handling to allow the Alumahyde to cure.



I am using this tonight.....what should I use to claen and degrease? Brake or carb cleaner?
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 5:57:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By HK_DUDE:

The two tips I can offer regarding the use of Alumahyde is to make sure you clean and degrease the parts to be painted as thoroughly as possible and once painted, wait, wait and wait some more - at least a week before handling to allow the Alumahyde to cure.



I am using this tonight.....what should I use to claen and degrease? Brake or carb cleaner?



Brake cleaner works for me.
Link Posted: 9/10/2004 6:25:14 AM EST
Thanks much!
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 9:00:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By river_rat:

Originally Posted By Hateca:
If you are going to paint your weapon use Norrells Moly Resin. Pre-heat the part, spray the part, bake at 300 for an hour, oil, and good to go. Once cured chemicals will not affect it. You can also do any material that can withstand the oven heat. You can even do plastic or stocks, just bake at 150 for two hours. If the finish is scratched or worn, this stuff can be applied over itself with out stripping. Great stuff.



Ok, so where can it be found? Never heard of it before.



This should be able to answer most Norrells questions, and give you a pretty good idea of how to refinish an AR15.
www.glocksunlocked.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=10200
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