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Posted: 3/17/2005 12:35:44 PM EST
can any body tell me where is this posted ?
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 12:39:20 PM EST
Here's some reading for ya:

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=210225

We recently discussed AR-15/M16 trigger jobs in an armorers course instructed by Sully. He said that a good trigger job should take hours to perform, and shouldn't involve cutting the legs from any springs.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 12:59:10 PM EST
thanks gee thats the second time in two days some one said somthig about cutting springs ?
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 1:08:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By schornstinefager:
thanks gee thats the second time in two days some one said somthig about cutting springs ?



I've never studied the so-called "15 minute trigger job", but it seems like people are cutting (or sometimes bending) one of the hammer springs legs to reduce spring tension. It would be a better idea just to buy the correct lighter springs.
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 2:08:50 PM EST
i just followed the link... see what ya meen by cutting and bending i seem to remeber a drop in trigger that was ajustable i guess it s off to the ee
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 3:35:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By schornstinefager:
i seem to remeber a drop in trigger that was ajustable i guess it s off to the ee



Is this the one? It sounds like it will drop right in within a minute or so.

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=223493
Link Posted: 3/17/2005 4:20:09 PM EST
It seemed to me that much of the "15 minute trigger job" was simply smoothing out the sear/hammer engagement to eliminate drag (and maybe some creep, too).

I recall that valve grinding compound was a popular and inexpensive way to smooth out revolver triggers back in the '80s, and the technique had the advantage of keeping engagement angles consistent. You just took off the sideplate, put a little compound between the hammer and the frame, and a touch between the trigger and hammer, and did a lot of single action-type manipulation until the hammer swung smooth and the trigger slid off the hammer like silk. Then you bathed the whole area in solvent to wash away the grinding compound, lubed accordingly, and you were set.

It seems to me that all it would take to be able to do this with AR parts would be a steel plate with appropriate holes for hammer and trigger springs, and a spare set of pins. Slap your hammer and trigger onto the plate's pins (with springs, of course), drop some compound between sear and notch, and manipulate the hammer and trigger to get them smoothed together. Of course this "steel plate" would need some sort of bumper for the hammer to land on, and should be suitable for clamping onto a bench, but the idea is pretty simple. The only "advantage" the 15 minute technique seems to have is that you don't have to pull any parts.

I am 100% against cutting springs. Special purpose springs are not so expensive that you couldn't afford to buy weaker springs instead of cutting what you have.

So, am I missing anything about this procedure?
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