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Posted: 11/11/2004 3:31:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: Striker]
Link Posted: 11/11/2004 3:32:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#1]
Link Posted: 11/11/2004 3:33:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#2]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#3]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#4]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#5]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#6]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#7]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#8]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#9]
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[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#10]
Link Posted: 11/11/2004 3:37:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: QCMGR] [#11]
Link Posted: 11/12/2004 10:08:49 AM EST
[#12]
Thank-you for sharing these instructions with us.


Originally Posted By QCMGR:

Dealing with acid.



I work with chemical acids as a normal part of my duties at work.  QCMGR did adequately cover safety procedures for handling concentrated acid solutions, but I feel that there is a need to amplify what was written.  These are four basic rules for handling and working around acids:

1.  Wear personal safety equipment.  Minimum - goggles for your eyes and rubber gloves that extend past your wrists for your hands.  Nitrile or butyl rubber gloves are best.  Surgical latex gloves are not adequate.  Wearing an apron is also strongly recommended.

2.  "Always Add Acid Rule."  Like QCMGR wrote: "Always add acid."  This means to first place water in your container, and then add the acid to the water.  NEVER add water to acid.  You MUST add acid to water.  This is particularly important when working with battery acid, which is sulfuric acid.  If water is poured into acid, the acid will splatter, often violently.

3.  Never assume that even small drips and puddles are safe.  Get a pack of pH paper and use it to test wet areas.  I use the colorpHast brand Universal test strips which indicate over the full 0 - 14 s.u. pH range.  

4.  Use pH paper to test your neutralized acids too.  Never assume a solution is neutralized.  Most local sewer ordinances have strict laws about releasing acids to the sewers.  A slug of improperly neutralized acid can attack metal and concrete piping.  It can also poison and possibly ruin a septic tank.  As QCMGR suggested, merely adding baking soda until the acid solution stops fizzing is a good rule of thumb to follow.  But having a box of inexpensive pH paper on hand is cheap insurance.  Always test before you dump.

-Wolf


Link Posted: 11/24/2004 9:27:49 AM EST
[#13]
What exactly is a KT-15?
Link Posted: 11/24/2004 9:56:34 AM EST
[#14]
80% reciever from Kristi Machine.

EXCELLENT post, very imformative, thank you!!!
Link Posted: 11/25/2004 12:24:59 PM EST
[#15]
Great post, thanks!  Just a minor correction, the anodizing materials can be obtained from www.caswellplating.com, not www.caswells.com.
Link Posted: 12/5/2004 11:27:05 AM EST
[#16]
Im on the same page as klutch what is a kt-15
Link Posted: 12/7/2004 9:15:27 PM EST
[#17]
It's an 80% completed AR-15 lower reciever.  80% complete means, you have to finish it.  The reciever can be shipped to your house without going through an FFL, it's not a gun until you finish it.

Basically, unless you live in Commifornia, you get to build the reciever without putting on a serial number, or any markings (unless you want to add them).  The reciever can be either a pistol or a rifle, but not full auto or anything illegal.

The only downside besides the fact that you have to do work is you can NEVER sell the reciever... ever.  The whole idea is to have an unmarked gun that you can tell people that you built yourself, rather than having something that had a BM snake on it, or something to that effect.
Link Posted: 12/8/2004 2:25:51 AM EST
[#18]

Originally Posted By PigGuy:
The only downside besides the fact that you have to do work is you can NEVER sell the reciever... ever.



This is WRONG.  You can sell it, but you need to be careful about selling.  If you sold it without ever using it, you are in trouble.

Feel free to point me to the regs that say you cannot sell it.  Starting pint is www.ttb.gov

mark
Link Posted: 12/8/2004 2:44:21 AM EST
[#19]

Originally Posted By budam:

Originally Posted By PigGuy:
The only downside besides the fact that you have to do work is you can NEVER sell the reciever... ever.



This is WRONG.  You can sell it, but you need to be careful about selling.  If you sold it without ever using it, you are in trouble.

Feel free to point me to the regs that say you cannot sell it.  Starting pint is www.ttb.gov

mark



the never using it part is bullshit.....if you build it, and it sits in the safe for 30 years, and THEN you sell it, it won't matter that it wasn't used, it was built with the intention of keeping it.  On the other hand, if you build it, and sell it the next day, then you'll most likely be in some trouble
Link Posted: 12/9/2004 2:28:27 AM EST
[#20]

Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:

the never using it part is bullshit.....if you build it, and it sits in the safe for 30 years, and THEN you sell it, it won't matter that it wasn't used, it was built with the intention of keeping it.  On the other hand, if you build it, and sell it the next day, then you'll most likely be in some trouble



My friend, you know not what you speak...  Go to www.ttb.gov and read up on the FAQ area where they answer this specific question...  I will let you go find it since you are so willing to say you know better without ever having read the regulations.

If you sell it and it has not been used, you are in trouble, as far as the government is concerned.  You may not like it, but that is life...

mark
Link Posted: 12/10/2004 5:36:49 PM EST
[#21]
This is from the ATF website "Firearms FAQ."  

Does the GCA prohibit anyone from making a handgun, shotgun or rifle?

With certain exceptions a firearm may be made by a nonlicensee provided it is not for sale and the maker is not prohibited from possessing firearms.

However, a person is prohibited from making a semiautomatic assault weapon or assembling a nonsporting semiautomatic rifle or nonsporting shotgun from imported parts.

In addition, the making of an NFA firearm requires a tax payment and approval by ATF. An application to make a machinegun will not be approved unless documentation is submitted showing that the firearm is being made for a federal or state agency. [18 U. S. C. 922( o), (r), (v), and 923, 27 CFR 178.39, 178.40, 178.41 and 179.105]


The "not for sale" language is referring to the fact that anyone "in the business" of making firearms must be licensed, i.e., hold the proper FFL.  This is not so much about guns, but taxes and regulation. A good comparison would be car sales.  Anybody can sell his own car without a dealer's license, maybe a couple or three cars a year, but someone who sells multiple cars as private sales and does it enough to "derive substantial income" from those sales could get into big trouble with his state government for doing business as a car dealer without a license.

That's what the language means - not that you can't sell a gun you make yourself, but that you can't become a gun dealer unless you have an FFL.  The government can't prohibit you from disposing of your (lawfully) owned personal property in any (lawful) way you see fit.

Hope that makes it a little more clear.

And for those of you who don't believe me:  www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#a7
Link Posted: 12/10/2004 5:40:30 PM EST
[#22]
the above is correct, however just as a side note, you can now make semiautomatic assault weapons since the AWB expired.  The ATF has to update their sight.
Link Posted: 12/11/2004 3:18:10 AM EST
[#23]
OK.  Here is the quote from the ttb.gov website at www.ttb.gov/fet/faet_gunsmiths.htm

3. If my customer is considered the manufacturer, when is he or she liable for FAET?

The customer is liable for FAET if:

• He or she sells the firearm before using it; or

• He or she uses the firearm in the operation of his or her business.

You must use the gun outside of business for it to be a personal gun before you sell it...

Ihope this clears up the confusion about not knowing the regulations.

mark
Link Posted: 12/11/2004 9:17:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: DefenderofLiberty] [#24]
KT Ordnance is a good source for "80% recievers" to build your own KT15 (AR15), 1911, KT228 (Sig P228), etc.  I own all 3 of these.  Check out his website, and if you decide to order something from him, tell him Defender of Liberty told you about it.
Link Posted: 12/22/2004 10:25:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: BB] [#25]

Originally Posted By QCMGR:
The following tools are required to build the KT Ordnance KT-15 lower receiver assembly.

1. A Drill Press;  (A cheap drill press will do.  A $50 or $60 drill press is perfectly adequate)

2. A small milling machine; (One can use a drill press and an X-Y table in lieu of the milling machine.  However, special care is needed.  This will be explained in the section entitled: “Magazine Catch Slot Machining”.)


I would think that if you had a mill, you wouldn't need a drill press.
Link Posted: 12/22/2004 8:35:21 PM EST
[#26]

Originally Posted By budam:
OK.  Here is the quote from the ttb.gov website at www.ttb.gov/fet/faet_gunsmiths.htm

3. If my customer is considered the manufacturer, when is he or she liable for FAET?

The customer is liable for FAET if:

• He or she sells the firearm before using it; or

• He or she uses the firearm in the operation of his or her business.

You must use the gun outside of business for it to be a personal gun before you sell it...

Ihope this clears up the confusion about not knowing the regulations.

mark



Still doesn't say that you can't sell it without using it.  Just means that if you do so, you have to pay the excise tax.  Couldn't find anything that said you had to have an FFL to pay the tax either (doesn't mean its not true though...the treasury and batfe have done stupider things before)

But what the hell, I don't feel like arguing, so if you wanna clame victory and insist you're right, have at it.
Link Posted: 1/5/2005 6:44:42 PM EST
[#27]
Err...  I'm confused.  "• He or she sells the firearm before using it; or"

If those are the ATF's words, then that sounds like you have to use it...
Link Posted: 1/5/2005 7:01:10 PM EST
[#28]
EEK!

The cheapest milling machine at harborfreight $400
www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=42976

Cheaper ones out there?
Link Posted: 1/17/2005 7:30:50 PM EST
[#29]

Originally Posted By Gator:
EEK!

The cheapest milling machine at harborfreight $400
www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=42976

Cheaper ones out there?



I went to a local Harbor Freight store today.  There was an even cheaper one at $295, but the turn wheels are made of plastic, they all look flimsy (including one linked above) and they are all made in China (surprise surprise).  I have hard time believing these are capable of precision works.  Better I save more money and buy a Grizzley.
Link Posted: 2/4/2005 11:57:06 PM EST
[#30]

Originally Posted By BB:

Originally Posted By QCMGR:
The following tools are required to build the KT Ordnance KT-15 lower receiver assembly.

1. A Drill Press;  (A cheap drill press will do.  A $50 or $60 drill press is perfectly adequate)

2. A small milling machine; (One can use a drill press and an X-Y table in lieu of the milling machine.  However, special care is needed.  This will be explained in the section entitled: “Magazine Catch Slot Machining”.)


I would think that if you had a mill, you wouldn't need a drill press.



The drill press would be helpful for chasing the buffer tube threads and some of the vertical drilling operations.  Some of those operations are tight on space on a full sized Bridgeport.  
Link Posted: 2/15/2005 2:30:13 PM EST
[Last Edit: w_houle] [#31]

Originally Posted By QCMGR:
Chapter 4:

Drilling the Receiver holes:
 


With the buffer tube hole tapped, you are now ready to drill the receiver holes.  There are a few important things to keep in mind.

1. The quality of your work depends heavily on your tools. Do not use cheap Chinese drill bits.  You must acquire the best drill bits available.  The bits available from MSC are first class and you should consider ordering them if you cannot easily find proper drill bits. Do not buy cheap, common drill bits at your local hardware store!  I made this mistake with my first build.  From now on, I only use top quality US-made drill bits.

2. Before drilling anything, make sure that your drill press spins truly.  Inspect the press to see if the spinning drill bit wobbles.  You should get a new drill press if your press is a “wobbler”.

3. Do not even think of using a hand drill to finish your receiver.  It can be done, but trust me---it is generally a very bad idea to forego a drill press.

4. If you plan to use your drill press to mill the magazine slot, make sure to drill your receiver holes first.  The importance of this step cannot be overstated.

With the above caveats out of the way, let’s discuss the drilling.  Ensure that the jig is clamped inside a drill press vise.  The vise is orientated so that the drill bit can enter the pilot holes located on the side of the jig.  Drill the selector hole with a 3’8” bit.  Drill slowly and carefully; use lots of cutting oil.  You must drill through both sides of the receiver.  The drill should operate at slow to medium speed.  

The hammer-pin and trigger-pin holes are both drilled with a 5/32” drill bit.  The front and rear takedown pin holes are both drilled with a ¼” drill bit.  With all of these holes, you must drill

through both sides of the receiver.  I say again:  Use lots of cutting oil.

The final hole to be drilled is the rear trigger-guard-pin hole.   This hole is drilled with a 1/8” drill bit.  Drill this hole through both sides of the receiver. Be careful!  Do not apply excess force; if you do so, damage can result to the trigger guard area.  Do not drill the left front of the trigger guard area!  The  front of the trigger guard only has one hole; this hole is located on the right side of the receiver.  

In summary:

1. Make sure that the jig screws are tight before the drilling begins. Make sure that the jig is still perfectly aligned.  Do not remove the receiver from the jig once drilling has begun.
2. Use a drill press to drill the holes.
3. Inspect your drill press to ensure that it spins truly.
4. Do not use a hand drill.
5. Use lots of cutting oil.
6. The drill should operate at slow to medium speed.
7. Use only quality drill bits.
8. If you must use the drill press to mill the magazine release slot, make sure that you drill the receiver holes first.
9. Work carefully and slowly.


Once the drilling is done, the receiver is almost complete.


OK not trying to nit pick here but are you calling for a 3’8” drill bit or a 3/8" drill bit because I have nothing to accomidate an almost 4 foot drill bit
Link Posted: 2/17/2005 1:09:10 AM EST
[#32]
I have a pretty simple question for you all. I am pretty excited to build my own AR-15. Plus I have never built my own rifle before. I looked at the KT-15 from KT Ordinance and then looked at the price. So let me get this straight The KT-15 is $200.

I was looking on Bushmasters web site and found Bushmasters XM15 E2S Stripped Lower Receiver for $184 Suggested Retail and The Bushmaster XM15 E2S Complete Lower Receiver for  $259.

It seems that it would be cheaper to buy the Bushmaster Reciever and not have to finish it your self.

Or am I missing the point here?
Would there be any benifits by using the KT-15?

Thanks
It is good to be apart of this group.
Harlow
Link Posted: 2/17/2005 6:39:55 AM EST
[#33]
No. Get a lower from DSA, $25. More steps involved since it's not an 80% lower, but hey, if youve got a mill you might as well.
Link Posted: 2/19/2005 2:54:57 PM EST
[#34]
Thanks for the reply BB ,

   I will have to Check out the DSA's, thats a good point. I have an access to a mill at work plus they also do anodizing. All in all it should not be to hard. Plus there is also the tannery shop I have been looking at. Thanks for the info I will look it up right now.

Harlow
Link Posted: 3/16/2005 9:32:36 AM EST
[#35]
cncgunsmithing not only offers a very reasonably priced receiver jig, but they also document (with photos) the production of a receiver from a solid block.  In conjunction with the tutorial, above, the cncgunsmithing documentation should provide you with sufficient information to allow you to turn a DSA casting into a complete lower receiver.

http://www.cncgunsmithing.com/projects/ar15lower.html
Link Posted: 6/21/2005 8:12:09 PM EST
[#36]
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 1:09:56 AM EST
[#37]
I gues i had some extra time and i PDFed Building the KT-15 - By Secret Gunsmith for viewing use adobe acrobat reader (FREE) from ADOBE.com

documents are .ZIPed you can use UnZIPping tools from here or use WinRAR or WinACE


Building The KT-15 By Secret Gunsmith

Mujahadeen AR-15

Link Posted: 11/25/2005 12:01:19 PM EST
[#38]

Originally Posted By Harlow:
I have a pretty simple question for you all. I am pretty excited to build my own AR-15. Plus I have never built my own rifle before. I looked at the KT-15 from KT Ordinance and then looked at the price. So let me get this straight The KT-15 is $200.

I was looking on Bushmasters web site and found Bushmasters XM15 E2S Stripped Lower Receiver for $184 Suggested Retail and The Bushmaster XM15 E2S Complete Lower Receiver for  $259.

It seems that it would be cheaper to buy the Bushmaster Reciever and not have to finish it your self.

Or am I missing the point here?
Would there be any benifits by using the KT-15?

Thanks
It is good to be apart of this group.
Harlow



To me, the benefits are many: satisfaction from doing it yourself, learning more about the fit and function of the firearm, builds technical skills, increases hand-eye coordination, gives you a project you and your child can work on together, gets you out of the house, and best of all NO FREAKIN NAME AND SERIAL NUMBER ON SOME #*&%$# FEDERAL FORM
Link Posted: 12/6/2005 11:24:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: XxSLASHERxX] [#39]
o
Link Posted: 4/26/2007 5:19:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: Striker] [#40]
unlock for a url edit..
Link Posted: 4/26/2007 5:20:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: Striker] [#41]
update done.
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 4:29:09 PM EST
[Last Edit: thebeekeeper1] [#42]
Unlocked by request of XxSlasherxX.
Link Posted: 10/26/2007 9:41:28 PM EST
[#43]
can you SBR an 80% lower?
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 7:50:35 PM EST
[#44]
Where can you buy the receivers?
Link Posted: 12/9/2007 10:25:19 PM EST
[#45]
you can't any more, atf took them to court and they can't, won't sell untill
court decides. this is going on 2 yrs I think. go to their site and read about it.
You can get 80% receivers other places though, just not the bolt together.
those were
Link Posted: 2/4/2008 4:34:29 PM EST
[#46]
I just saw the site and pics of the bolt-together lower-as I understand it you still had to drill the trigger and hammer pin holes, correct?

And on the regular 80% lowers, it looked like the holes were located and center-punched or at least marked-is that what got them in hot water with BATFE?
Link Posted: 5/29/2008 11:48:11 AM EST
[#47]
Any updates? I would be money ahead by just getting a stripped lower thru an FFL, but there is the attraction of building it myself...
Link Posted: 11/8/2008 7:11:47 PM EST
[#48]
Originally Posted By DefenderofLiberty:
KT Ordnance is a good source for "80% recievers" to build your own KT15 (AR15), 1911, KT228 (Sig P228), etc.  I own all 3 of these.  Check out his website, and if you decide to order something from him, tell him Defender of Liberty told you about it.



No AR forgings at the site.

Link Posted: 11/18/2008 1:37:30 PM EST
[#49]
Originally Posted By Maryland_Shooter:
Originally Posted By DefenderofLiberty:
KT Ordnance is a good source for "80% recievers" to build your own KT15 (AR15), 1911, KT228 (Sig P228), etc.  I own all 3 of these.  Check out his website, and if you decide to order something from him, tell him Defender of Liberty told you about it.



No AR forgings at the site.





follow link
click on 60% firearm kits
click on product
scroll down till you see the link for the cnc gunsmithing mini set-up jig click it
the page that comes up has everything that you need for finishing and getting a lower.
Link Posted: 3/6/2009 10:38:37 PM EST
[#50]
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