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Posted: 10/26/2004 11:04:59 AM EST
I have a post-ban Global Trades SSR-85-C with the welded-on slant brake. I like the slant brake, but want it to be removable for other brakes or the muzzle nut. I realize removing it will destroy it, so I will need a new one and that is fine, I just want the threaded muzzle, so I can say I have an "assault weapon". (No I don't want a folder. I bought this gun after the ban sunset and got it for a song as I was probably the only person in America who didn't want a folding-stock AK. I also had a hell of a time finding one that hadn't been converted.)

I read on here where a guy used a bench grinder to cut through the weld. The weld is at the 6 O'Clock position and I am not sure how to proceed.

How to remove it? Will a bench grinder work? I really don't want to fuck up the barrel.

Any help and tips are appreciated.

Link Posted: 10/26/2004 11:13:14 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 11:23:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
the bench grinder is kinda crude and will require a very deft touch to control the rifle against the grinding wheel.

i prefer a die grinder or dremel tool used while the rifle is solidly held in a vise.

cut away as much of the brake/weld as possible WITHOUT going deep enough to contact the bbl.

try 'cracking' the last remaining weld with a pipe wrench on the brake...CAREFULLY! not too much torque!!!

then, clean up the remaining weld with a file and chase the threads with a die if required.



at the risk of looking really stupid, what is a "Die Grinder"? I have a dremel somewhere but I didn't think a Dremel would have the horsepower to cut through the metal.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 12:10:50 PM EST
A die grinder is a dremel on steroids. I think they are all air powered. If you have a compressor Sears has cheap die grinders.

I have a new AMD-63, the slant brake doesn't look welded on but it won't move. Are they usually really tight? I know the threads are reversed and I removed the plunger so I didn't have to bother holding it down.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 12:12:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By Pinned-Recessed:

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
the bench grinder is kinda crude and will require a very deft touch to control the rifle against the grinding wheel.

i prefer a die grinder or dremel tool used while the rifle is solidly held in a vise.

cut away as much of the brake/weld as possible WITHOUT going deep enough to contact the bbl.

try 'cracking' the last remaining weld with a pipe wrench on the brake...CAREFULLY! not too much torque!!!

then, clean up the remaining weld with a file and chase the threads with a die if required.



at the risk of looking really stupid, what is a "Die Grinder"? I have a dremel somewhere but I didn't think a Dremel would have the horsepower to cut through the metal.



Yes, it does.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 12:43:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By sp1shooter:
A die grinder is a dremel on steroids. I think they are all air powered. If you have a compressor Sears has cheap die grinders.

I have a new AMD-63, the slant brake doesn't look welded on but it won't move. Are they usually really tight? I know the threads are reversed and I removed the plunger so I didn't have to bother holding it down.



Yes, go to harbor freight. You will need compressed air source to use a die grinder. I prefer the 90 degree style with an arbor and a cutoff wheel. That is what I used to find the pin in my brake. Once I could see where both ends were, I tapped it with a punch and it popped right out. (It was not easy to see.)
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 1:56:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2004 1:58:33 PM EST by I-M-A-WMD]

at the risk of looking really stupid, what is a "Die Grinder"? I have a dremel somewhere but I didn't think a Dremel would have the horsepower to cut through the metal.


In the wise words of my Dad, "Mind that dremel... Don't forget it's a hungry little MFer". Very wise as I've found it's easy to remove metal, and really hard to put it back once it's dremeled off.

Dremel with the cutting disks will work like a champ for taking off a welded on brake.. All the die-grinders and muffler cut-off tools I've used when I was a welder/fabricator had a characteristic that in this case would make me dive for the dremel. On these heavier tools, the disks were at least an 1/8" thick... Way to thick for such delicate surgery IMHO.

The thing to keep in mind is to cut away the weld and if necessary into the brake, not the weld and into the Front site base... And of course, don't go in deep enough to hit the threads.

ETA: Repeat after me, "Mind that Dremel, don't forget it's a hungry little MFer".

Sly
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 2:19:13 PM EST
Any pics on where the pin is?
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 2:26:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2004 2:27:06 PM EST by I-M-A-WMD]

Originally Posted By sp1shooter:
Any pics on where the pin is?



Now I'm getting a little worried... I was addressing a brake that was welded only to the front of the front site base, not one that was blind pinned and then welded. That's a little more complicated but still do-able.

Pinned-Recessed, is your's blind pinned or just welded to the FSB?

Sly
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 2:30:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By I-M-A-WMD:

Originally Posted By sp1shooter:
Any pics on where the pin is?



Now I'm getting a little worried... I was addressing a brake that was welded only to the front of the front site base, not one that was blind pinned and then welded. That's a little more complicated but still do-able.

Pinned-Recessed, is your's blind pinned or just welded to the FSB?

Sly



It does not appear to be welded to the FSB. The weld is at the six o'clock on the brake, and does not appear to touch the FSB in any way.

Is mine pinned & welded? how much harder would it be to remove?

Link Posted: 10/26/2004 2:37:57 PM EST
Here's a few pics:



Link Posted: 10/26/2004 2:59:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2004 3:00:18 PM EST by I-M-A-WMD]

Originally Posted By Pinned-Recessed:

Originally Posted By I-M-A-WMD:

Originally Posted By sp1shooter:
Any pics on where the pin is?



Now I'm getting a little worried... I was addressing a brake that was welded only to the front of the front site base, not one that was blind pinned and then welded. That's a little more complicated but still do-able.

Pinned-Recessed, is your's blind pinned or just welded to the FSB?

Sly



It does not appear to be welded to the FSB. The weld is at the six o'clock on the brake, and does not appear to touch the FSB in any way.

Is mine pinned & welded? how much harder would it be to remove?




Damn...

I'm not sure how many other folks were thinking along the same lines as me, brake welded to FSB, but here's what I think you have to do. After reading this suggestion, wait for someone else to confirm or deny my comprehension before doing anything...

IIRC, you need to use a dremel, or similar instrument, to cut the brake length-wise. Where the brake is over the threaded portion of the barrel, USE EXTREME caution to only cut down far enough to be CLOSE to the threads. Where the brake extends beyond the barrel, cut through the brake completely. Once you have a slit in the break, with the front of the brake cut all the way through, you use a chisel to split the brake. If all is well, the brake will spilt along your cut and then can be bent off the threaded portion of the barrel. CAUTION is the key word.

HOWEVER, it is not apparent to me, by casual inspection of your pictures, whether your brake has been threaded and then blind pinned/welded on. You might remove the brake only to find that it was pressed on to a plain barrel or just slipped over and blind pinned/welded. Hell, it might not have been pinned at all, just a large hole drilled into the brake and then the hole welded shut directly to the barrel and or threads. I'd contact the factory to see if they have any info on how the brake was attached before attempting anything.

As I stated before, hopefully the gurus have a better idea, for the moment the above is worth exactly what you paid for it and I'm giving you my 2 cents... You can keep the change.

Sly
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:55:38 PM EST
Mine looks nothing like that.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 5:36:52 PM EST
What CAMPYBOB has suggested will work.

Once the Brake is screwed on, they drill a hole through the slant brake and slightly into the barrrel. Then they drive a pin into the hole and weld over the top, finished up by rebluing. Pretty crappy looking job on yours BTW.

Use a Dremel to remove material from the weld. The pin is approximately centered in the welded-over area.

One thing you need to be careful with is cutting into the threads. It's difficult to differentiate barrel from brake from pin once you've started grinding. The grinding action will make the pin indistinguishable from the other metal (usually). What you can do as you get close is to take some pliers and work the brake back and forth. Eventually, you'll get the pin to separate from the surrounding metal to stand out.

I did the exact same thing with my AK74 type brake. The gunsmith who had originally installed it also Loctite'd the brake on, so it took some effort.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 7:21:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By Zhukov:
What CAMPYBOB has suggested will work.

Once the Brake is screwed on, they drill a hole through the slant brake and slightly into the barrrel. Then they drive a pin into the hole and weld over the top, finished up by rebluing. Pretty crappy looking job on yours BTW.

Use a Dremel to remove material from the weld. The pin is approximately centered in the welded-over area.

One thing you need to be careful with is cutting into the threads. It's difficult to differentiate barrel from brake from pin once you've started grinding. The grinding action will make the pin indistinguishable from the other metal (usually). What you can do as you get close is to take some pliers and work the brake back and forth. Eventually, you'll get the pin to separate from the surrounding metal to stand out.

I did the exact same thing with my AK74 type brake. The gunsmith who had originally installed it also Loctite'd the brake on, so it took some effort.



So how fucked up would the threads be? This is a real pisser. I am hoping once I remove it, I'll be able to use the threaded muzzle properly, meaning I can put another brake or nut on, and it'll work 100%

Did the pin being drilled into the threads hurt anything? That can NOT be good.
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