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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/23/2005 8:22:30 AM EDT
ok big question,How do i and what can i use to heat the receiver and how when and what to quench it with.Can i use a torch or propain,Even dumber but figured id ask i couldnt use the kitchen stove or barbeque..What to do ..I going to try a flat and pre bent blank because i am totaly new at this and figured id try a couple different ways?Thanks
Link Posted: 7/23/2005 12:40:59 PM EDT
I think all you have to heat treat are the hammer and trigger pin holes. You want a water bath for quenching although some prefer an oil bath.

Do one hole at a time by first heating the hole until it is red hot, then quench. Do this for all 4 holes seperately. Then buff the holes til you you can see the steel and there is no discoloration due to the heating.

Then the next step is to heat each hole (again seperately) until you just get a darkish blue color, then quench. Repeat for each hole.

You will have 8 heating and quenchings when you done. I would get a mapp gas torch as I think propane would take to long to heat the steel. BTW, practice on some other steel of the same thickness before you do it on the receiver.
Link Posted: 7/23/2005 3:13:44 PM EDT
thanks
Link Posted: 7/23/2005 5:03:15 PM EDT
Don't forget the ejector
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 8:53:57 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 8/10/2005 11:05:03 AM EDT
That is all there is to it??? Damn, I was all freaked out over nothing, good enuff and thanks for the info. "G"
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 8:39:03 PM EDT
Do you really quench after second (blue) heating? I've been letting air-cool after the second heating for all my heat-treats, as that's how I was told to do it over at the Roderus board years ago. The theory I heard behind it was the quench makes it super hard (read brittle). Heating to blue then slower air cool slightly anneals (softens) things so it is less likely to shatter, but still retains some of the hardness gained from the first red-hot heat then quench.
Can some metallurgist clarify this (I know you're on here).

Link Posted: 8/12/2005 12:58:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2005 12:59:45 AM EDT by sandboxmedic]
You need to get it hotter than "red hot" before doing your first quenching. Here's som eeasy to use info:
www.surplusrifle.com/shooting2005/souptonuts2/index.asp

Link Posted: 8/12/2005 4:36:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By alpine18:
Do you really quench after second (blue) heating? I've been letting air-cool after the second heating for all my heat-treats, as that's how I was told to do it over at the Roderus board years ago. The theory I heard behind it was the quench makes it super hard (read brittle). Heating to blue then slower air cool slightly anneals (softens) things so it is less likely to shatter, but still retains some of the hardness gained from the first red-hot heat then quench.
Can some metallurgist clarify this (I know you're on here).




I thought the same thing as alpine18. I'm going to be starting on flats soon so I try to read up on heat treating. As a former Chem E I remember from my metallurgy class that annealing (makes ductile again vs being brittle) was completed and air cooled (2nd time around). People that make medieval armor heat treat their works by quenching first time and air cooling the second time. What do most people do?
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